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Backup for a specific period of time

 
 
jonboat
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      07-14-2006, 08:43 PM
We need to provide data for a state sales tax audit.
They require our Quickbooks data for a specific period of time (5/1/03
- 4/30/06).
How can we download a file that covers that particular time frame?
We thought to try to create a backup database for that particular time
frame but could not find a way to do so.
We have Quickbooks 2001.
Thanks

 
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Joanne
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      07-14-2006, 09:05 PM

"jonboat" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
> We need to provide data for a state sales tax audit.
> They require our Quickbooks data for a specific period of time (5/1/03
> - 4/30/06).
> How can we download a file that covers that particular time frame?
> We thought to try to create a backup database for that particular time
> frame but could not find a way to do so.
> We have Quickbooks 2001.
> Thanks


I would only give them reports which cover the audit period. I would not
give them my QB data file. To my knowledge, there is not a way to isolate a
period to provide a QB data file for that period only. Even if you lock
them out of a period older than the audit data, they still have access to
everything more recent.

--
Sincerely,
Joanne

If it's right for you, then it's right, . . . . . for you!!!

http://www.jobird.com



 
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HeyBub
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      07-14-2006, 09:34 PM
jonboat wrote:
> We need to provide data for a state sales tax audit.
> They require our Quickbooks data for a specific period of time (5/1/03
> - 4/30/06).
> How can we download a file that covers that particular time frame?
> We thought to try to create a backup database for that particular time
> frame but could not find a way to do so.
> We have Quickbooks 2001.
> Thanks


Don't give them your QB data. Give them a journal listing of all your
in-state sales, by customer, for the period. If they insist, provide
specific hard-copy invoices. It's not their concern what you sell outside of
their jurisdiction.Here's a little known secret:

Sales tax auditors have an informal, sub-rosa, network. Suppose you're in
Illinois. Your Illinois auditor notes you sold a bunch of stuff to a firm
in, say, California. Your Illinois auditor passes the information to his
California collegue, who then visits your client in California to collect
"use" tax on stuff bought out-of-state.

Next week, the information flow is reversed and you get nailed.

Screw 'em. Make 'em work for their bonuses.


 
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TKnTexas
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      07-16-2006, 01:04 AM
Your auditor will want to see the complete ledger, not just the sales
account. When they audit they look at taxes we charge on sales.
However, they also look at the exemptions we claim. They look at the
sales taxes charged on purchases. They actually "find more" in the
purchases than they do in the sales/revenues.

I have been through two sales tax audits here in Texas (last 3 yrs).
After going through the general ledger they requested the invoices to
back up certain postings. They found three violations (omissions) in
the purchases.
1) The construction invoices were for a single amount. Neither the
contract or the invoices showed the words "tax inclusive". So we had
to pay sales tax to Texas.

2) The expense reports from the general manager had purchases made on
the internet, with his credit card, from out of state that did not
charge sales tax. Texas says if you don't pay the full 8.25% (Dallas
jurisdiction is this amount) sales tax to another state in which you
make a purchase, you owe them the difference of full 8.25% if not
charged.

3) If we bought items from vendors within Texas, such as the other
side of the Metroplex in Fort Worth that has a 7.75%, then we owe Texas
the .5% difference.

One way or another the auditor said, ALL purchases except those for
resale, are liable for the 8.25% sales tax that Dallas has. Local rate
applies regardless of where the purchase is made.

I realize this is beyond the scope of BACKUP DATA from QuickBooks, but
having just wrote the huge check for the last audit, I thought I would
share it.

HeyBub wrote:
> jonboat wrote:
> > We need to provide data for a state sales tax audit.
> > They require our Quickbooks data for a specific period of time (5/1/03
> > - 4/30/06).
> > How can we download a file that covers that particular time frame?
> > We thought to try to create a backup database for that particular time
> > frame but could not find a way to do so.
> > We have Quickbooks 2001.
> > Thanks

>
> Don't give them your QB data. Give them a journal listing of all your
> in-state sales, by customer, for the period. If they insist, provide
> specific hard-copy invoices. It's not their concern what you sell outside of
> their jurisdiction.Here's a little known secret:
>
> Sales tax auditors have an informal, sub-rosa, network. Suppose you're in
> Illinois. Your Illinois auditor notes you sold a bunch of stuff to a firm
> in, say, California. Your Illinois auditor passes the information to his
> California collegue, who then visits your client in California to collect
> "use" tax on stuff bought out-of-state.
>
> Next week, the information flow is reversed and you get nailed.
>
> Screw 'em. Make 'em work for their bonuses.


 
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Golden California Girls
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      07-16-2006, 02:09 AM
TKnTexas wrote:
> Your auditor will want to see the complete ledger, not just the sales
> account. When they audit they look at taxes we charge on sales.
> However, they also look at the exemptions we claim. They look at the
> sales taxes charged on purchases. They actually "find more" in the
> purchases than they do in the sales/revenues.
>
> I have been through two sales tax audits here in Texas (last 3 yrs).
> After going through the general ledger they requested the invoices to
> back up certain postings. They found three violations (omissions) in
> the purchases.
> 1) The construction invoices were for a single amount. Neither the
> contract or the invoices showed the words "tax inclusive". So we had
> to pay sales tax to Texas.
>
> 2) The expense reports from the general manager had purchases made on
> the internet, with his credit card, from out of state that did not
> charge sales tax. Texas says if you don't pay the full 8.25% (Dallas
> jurisdiction is this amount) sales tax to another state in which you
> make a purchase, you owe them the difference of full 8.25% if not
> charged.
>
> 3) If we bought items from vendors within Texas, such as the other
> side of the Metroplex in Fort Worth that has a 7.75%, then we owe Texas
> the .5% difference.
>
> One way or another the auditor said, ALL purchases except those for
> resale, are liable for the 8.25% sales tax that Dallas has. Local rate
> applies regardless of where the purchase is made.
>
> I realize this is beyond the scope of BACKUP DATA from QuickBooks, but
> having just wrote the huge check for the last audit, I thought I would
> share it.


My last California audit wasn't about the purchase side of the house at
all. They only looked at the revenue side of the house. They had asked
for three years of invoices and backup. Started with the most current
quarter. They found a couple of very minor things in that quarter, a
couple of use taxes that should have been charged for out of state
sales, I don't think it amounted to $10. Auditor then said, basically
you are charging what you are supposed to. Then spent a few minutes
going over the couple things. Said we would get a letter telling us
while we weren't 100% clean, there would be no changes required. Wasn't
worth their time to go over the rest of it.

Boss was very happy. About eighteen months earlier I brought up that we
should be charging tax on one thing which we hadn't been. We changed
and started charging tax. If the auditor had started with the first of
those quarters rather than the last ......

Speaking of that, this reminds me I need to make a change to the invoice
form where I now work. "Title to masters pases to customer before first
use by us."

> HeyBub wrote:
>> jonboat wrote:
>>> We need to provide data for a state sales tax audit.
>>> They require our Quickbooks data for a specific period of time (5/1/03
>>> - 4/30/06).
>>> How can we download a file that covers that particular time frame?
>>> We thought to try to create a backup database for that particular time
>>> frame but could not find a way to do so.
>>> We have Quickbooks 2001.
>>> Thanks

>> Don't give them your QB data. Give them a journal listing of all your
>> in-state sales, by customer, for the period. If they insist, provide
>> specific hard-copy invoices. It's not their concern what you sell outside of
>> their jurisdiction.Here's a little known secret:
>>
>> Sales tax auditors have an informal, sub-rosa, network. Suppose you're in
>> Illinois. Your Illinois auditor notes you sold a bunch of stuff to a firm
>> in, say, California. Your Illinois auditor passes the information to his
>> California collegue, who then visits your client in California to collect
>> "use" tax on stuff bought out-of-state.
>>
>> Next week, the information flow is reversed and you get nailed.
>>
>> Screw 'em. Make 'em work for their bonuses.

>

 
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HeyBub
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      07-16-2006, 06:25 PM
TKnTexas wrote:
>>

> One way or another the auditor said, ALL purchases except those for
> resale, are liable for the 8.25% sales tax that Dallas has. Local rate
> applies regardless of where the purchase is made.


I'll disagree. Purchases that go for the production of revenue are exempt;
for example: tools, fertilizer, hootchi-kootchie girls. We develop software.
All computers and parts necessary for the development of same, plus
duplication equipment and media are similarily exempt. Point is, we don't
resell our computers, but we do use them to develop something we do sell.



 
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HeyBub
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      07-16-2006, 06:27 PM
TKnTexas wrote:
> Your auditor will want to see the complete ledger, not just the sales
> account. When they audit they look at taxes we charge on sales.
> However, they also look at the exemptions we claim. They look at the
> sales taxes charged on purchases. They actually "find more" in the
> purchases than they do in the sales/revenues.


They have no claim to examine sales you make to out-of-state clients.


 
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Joanne
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      07-16-2006, 08:50 PM

"HeyBub" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> TKnTexas wrote:
>> Your auditor will want to see the complete ledger, not just the sales
>> account. When they audit they look at taxes we charge on sales.
>> However, they also look at the exemptions we claim. They look at the
>> sales taxes charged on purchases. They actually "find more" in the
>> purchases than they do in the sales/revenues.

>
> They have no claim to examine sales you make to out-of-state clients.


Colorado auditors uncovered a scam where high-end jewelry was shipped to
Wyoming to avoid sales tax. I don't have all the facts, but I'm supposing
the stuff was then sent back to local purchasers.

So, they do take a close look at sales claimed as exempt from sales tax for
what ever reason.

--
Sincerely,
Joanne

If it's right for you, then it's right, . . . . . for you!!!

http://www.jobird.com


 
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HeyBub
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      07-17-2006, 01:38 PM
Joanne wrote:
> "HeyBub" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> TKnTexas wrote:
>>> Your auditor will want to see the complete ledger, not just the
>>> sales account. When they audit they look at taxes we charge on
>>> sales. However, they also look at the exemptions we claim. They
>>> look at the sales taxes charged on purchases. They actually "find
>>> more" in the purchases than they do in the sales/revenues.

>>
>> They have no claim to examine sales you make to out-of-state clients.

>
> Colorado auditors uncovered a scam where high-end jewelry was shipped
> to Wyoming to avoid sales tax. I don't have all the facts, but I'm
> supposing the stuff was then sent back to local purchasers.
>
> So, they do take a close look at sales claimed as exempt from sales
> tax for what ever reason.


They take a look at it only because the business permits them to do so.

There is nothing wrong with a "scam" to avoid taxes if the transaction is
otherwise legal. Selling stuff to someone in Wyoming where it is, in turn,
sold back to someone in Colorado is simply creative tax avoidance.

Years ago, before Texas allowed UPS to operate intrastate, a Texas fruitcake
maker shipped truckloads of their product to Shreveport, Louisiana where it
would be put into the UPS system for delivery in Texas. I believe that most
of those 1970-era fruitcakes are still in circulation.

Same thing (well, almost).


 
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TKnTexas
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      07-17-2006, 03:25 PM
Several years ago a business that I was in the process of shutting down
after seven years of operating received a notice of a sales tax audit,
a nightclub operation. They wanted copies of the bank statements as
well as the general ledger. They compared deposits with reported
sales.

HeyBub wrote:
> Joanne wrote:
> > "HeyBub" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> >> TKnTexas wrote:
> >>> Your auditor will want to see the complete ledger, not just the
> >>> sales account. When they audit they look at taxes we charge on
> >>> sales. However, they also look at the exemptions we claim. They
> >>> look at the sales taxes charged on purchases. They actually "find
> >>> more" in the purchases than they do in the sales/revenues.
> >>
> >> They have no claim to examine sales you make to out-of-state clients.

> >
> > Colorado auditors uncovered a scam where high-end jewelry was shipped
> > to Wyoming to avoid sales tax. I don't have all the facts, but I'm
> > supposing the stuff was then sent back to local purchasers.
> >
> > So, they do take a close look at sales claimed as exempt from sales
> > tax for what ever reason.

>
> They take a look at it only because the business permits them to do so.
>
> There is nothing wrong with a "scam" to avoid taxes if the transaction is
> otherwise legal. Selling stuff to someone in Wyoming where it is, in turn,
> sold back to someone in Colorado is simply creative tax avoidance.
>
> Years ago, before Texas allowed UPS to operate intrastate, a Texas fruitcake
> maker shipped truckloads of their product to Shreveport, Louisiana where it
> would be put into the UPS system for delivery in Texas. I believe that most
> of those 1970-era fruitcakes are still in circulation.
>
> Same thing (well, almost).


 
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