Backup for a specific period of time

Discussion in 'Quickbooks' started by jonboat, Jul 14, 2006.

  1. jonboat

    jonboat Guest

    We need to provide data for a state sales tax audit.
    They require our Quickbooks data for a specific period of time (5/1/03
    - 4/30/06).
    How can we download a file that covers that particular time frame?
    We thought to try to create a backup database for that particular time
    frame but could not find a way to do so.
    We have Quickbooks 2001.
    Thanks
     
    jonboat, Jul 14, 2006
    #1
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  2. jonboat

    Joanne Guest

    "jonboat" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > We need to provide data for a state sales tax audit.
    > They require our Quickbooks data for a specific period of time (5/1/03
    > - 4/30/06).
    > How can we download a file that covers that particular time frame?
    > We thought to try to create a backup database for that particular time
    > frame but could not find a way to do so.
    > We have Quickbooks 2001.
    > Thanks


    I would only give them reports which cover the audit period. I would not
    give them my QB data file. To my knowledge, there is not a way to isolate a
    period to provide a QB data file for that period only. Even if you lock
    them out of a period older than the audit data, they still have access to
    everything more recent.

    --
    Sincerely,
    Joanne

    If it's right for you, then it's right, . . . . . for you!!!

    http://www.jobird.com
     
    Joanne, Jul 14, 2006
    #2
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  3. jonboat

    HeyBub Guest

    jonboat wrote:
    > We need to provide data for a state sales tax audit.
    > They require our Quickbooks data for a specific period of time (5/1/03
    > - 4/30/06).
    > How can we download a file that covers that particular time frame?
    > We thought to try to create a backup database for that particular time
    > frame but could not find a way to do so.
    > We have Quickbooks 2001.
    > Thanks


    Don't give them your QB data. Give them a journal listing of all your
    in-state sales, by customer, for the period. If they insist, provide
    specific hard-copy invoices. It's not their concern what you sell outside of
    their jurisdiction.Here's a little known secret:

    Sales tax auditors have an informal, sub-rosa, network. Suppose you're in
    Illinois. Your Illinois auditor notes you sold a bunch of stuff to a firm
    in, say, California. Your Illinois auditor passes the information to his
    California collegue, who then visits your client in California to collect
    "use" tax on stuff bought out-of-state.

    Next week, the information flow is reversed and you get nailed.

    Screw 'em. Make 'em work for their bonuses.
     
    HeyBub, Jul 14, 2006
    #3
  4. jonboat

    TKnTexas Guest

    Your auditor will want to see the complete ledger, not just the sales
    account. When they audit they look at taxes we charge on sales.
    However, they also look at the exemptions we claim. They look at the
    sales taxes charged on purchases. They actually "find more" in the
    purchases than they do in the sales/revenues.

    I have been through two sales tax audits here in Texas (last 3 yrs).
    After going through the general ledger they requested the invoices to
    back up certain postings. They found three violations (omissions) in
    the purchases.
    1) The construction invoices were for a single amount. Neither the
    contract or the invoices showed the words "tax inclusive". So we had
    to pay sales tax to Texas.

    2) The expense reports from the general manager had purchases made on
    the internet, with his credit card, from out of state that did not
    charge sales tax. Texas says if you don't pay the full 8.25% (Dallas
    jurisdiction is this amount) sales tax to another state in which you
    make a purchase, you owe them the difference of full 8.25% if not
    charged.

    3) If we bought items from vendors within Texas, such as the other
    side of the Metroplex in Fort Worth that has a 7.75%, then we owe Texas
    the .5% difference.

    One way or another the auditor said, ALL purchases except those for
    resale, are liable for the 8.25% sales tax that Dallas has. Local rate
    applies regardless of where the purchase is made.

    I realize this is beyond the scope of BACKUP DATA from QuickBooks, but
    having just wrote the huge check for the last audit, I thought I would
    share it.

    HeyBub wrote:
    > jonboat wrote:
    > > We need to provide data for a state sales tax audit.
    > > They require our Quickbooks data for a specific period of time (5/1/03
    > > - 4/30/06).
    > > How can we download a file that covers that particular time frame?
    > > We thought to try to create a backup database for that particular time
    > > frame but could not find a way to do so.
    > > We have Quickbooks 2001.
    > > Thanks

    >
    > Don't give them your QB data. Give them a journal listing of all your
    > in-state sales, by customer, for the period. If they insist, provide
    > specific hard-copy invoices. It's not their concern what you sell outside of
    > their jurisdiction.Here's a little known secret:
    >
    > Sales tax auditors have an informal, sub-rosa, network. Suppose you're in
    > Illinois. Your Illinois auditor notes you sold a bunch of stuff to a firm
    > in, say, California. Your Illinois auditor passes the information to his
    > California collegue, who then visits your client in California to collect
    > "use" tax on stuff bought out-of-state.
    >
    > Next week, the information flow is reversed and you get nailed.
    >
    > Screw 'em. Make 'em work for their bonuses.
     
    TKnTexas, Jul 16, 2006
    #4
  5. TKnTexas wrote:
    > Your auditor will want to see the complete ledger, not just the sales
    > account. When they audit they look at taxes we charge on sales.
    > However, they also look at the exemptions we claim. They look at the
    > sales taxes charged on purchases. They actually "find more" in the
    > purchases than they do in the sales/revenues.
    >
    > I have been through two sales tax audits here in Texas (last 3 yrs).
    > After going through the general ledger they requested the invoices to
    > back up certain postings. They found three violations (omissions) in
    > the purchases.
    > 1) The construction invoices were for a single amount. Neither the
    > contract or the invoices showed the words "tax inclusive". So we had
    > to pay sales tax to Texas.
    >
    > 2) The expense reports from the general manager had purchases made on
    > the internet, with his credit card, from out of state that did not
    > charge sales tax. Texas says if you don't pay the full 8.25% (Dallas
    > jurisdiction is this amount) sales tax to another state in which you
    > make a purchase, you owe them the difference of full 8.25% if not
    > charged.
    >
    > 3) If we bought items from vendors within Texas, such as the other
    > side of the Metroplex in Fort Worth that has a 7.75%, then we owe Texas
    > the .5% difference.
    >
    > One way or another the auditor said, ALL purchases except those for
    > resale, are liable for the 8.25% sales tax that Dallas has. Local rate
    > applies regardless of where the purchase is made.
    >
    > I realize this is beyond the scope of BACKUP DATA from QuickBooks, but
    > having just wrote the huge check for the last audit, I thought I would
    > share it.


    My last California audit wasn't about the purchase side of the house at
    all. They only looked at the revenue side of the house. They had asked
    for three years of invoices and backup. Started with the most current
    quarter. They found a couple of very minor things in that quarter, a
    couple of use taxes that should have been charged for out of state
    sales, I don't think it amounted to $10. Auditor then said, basically
    you are charging what you are supposed to. Then spent a few minutes
    going over the couple things. Said we would get a letter telling us
    while we weren't 100% clean, there would be no changes required. Wasn't
    worth their time to go over the rest of it.

    Boss was very happy. About eighteen months earlier I brought up that we
    should be charging tax on one thing which we hadn't been. We changed
    and started charging tax. If the auditor had started with the first of
    those quarters rather than the last ......

    Speaking of that, this reminds me I need to make a change to the invoice
    form where I now work. "Title to masters pases to customer before first
    use by us."

    > HeyBub wrote:
    >> jonboat wrote:
    >>> We need to provide data for a state sales tax audit.
    >>> They require our Quickbooks data for a specific period of time (5/1/03
    >>> - 4/30/06).
    >>> How can we download a file that covers that particular time frame?
    >>> We thought to try to create a backup database for that particular time
    >>> frame but could not find a way to do so.
    >>> We have Quickbooks 2001.
    >>> Thanks

    >> Don't give them your QB data. Give them a journal listing of all your
    >> in-state sales, by customer, for the period. If they insist, provide
    >> specific hard-copy invoices. It's not their concern what you sell outside of
    >> their jurisdiction.Here's a little known secret:
    >>
    >> Sales tax auditors have an informal, sub-rosa, network. Suppose you're in
    >> Illinois. Your Illinois auditor notes you sold a bunch of stuff to a firm
    >> in, say, California. Your Illinois auditor passes the information to his
    >> California collegue, who then visits your client in California to collect
    >> "use" tax on stuff bought out-of-state.
    >>
    >> Next week, the information flow is reversed and you get nailed.
    >>
    >> Screw 'em. Make 'em work for their bonuses.

    >
     
    Golden California Girls, Jul 16, 2006
    #5
  6. jonboat

    HeyBub Guest

    TKnTexas wrote:
    >>

    > One way or another the auditor said, ALL purchases except those for
    > resale, are liable for the 8.25% sales tax that Dallas has. Local rate
    > applies regardless of where the purchase is made.


    I'll disagree. Purchases that go for the production of revenue are exempt;
    for example: tools, fertilizer, hootchi-kootchie girls. We develop software.
    All computers and parts necessary for the development of same, plus
    duplication equipment and media are similarily exempt. Point is, we don't
    resell our computers, but we do use them to develop something we do sell.
     
    HeyBub, Jul 16, 2006
    #6
  7. jonboat

    HeyBub Guest

    TKnTexas wrote:
    > Your auditor will want to see the complete ledger, not just the sales
    > account. When they audit they look at taxes we charge on sales.
    > However, they also look at the exemptions we claim. They look at the
    > sales taxes charged on purchases. They actually "find more" in the
    > purchases than they do in the sales/revenues.


    They have no claim to examine sales you make to out-of-state clients.
     
    HeyBub, Jul 16, 2006
    #7
  8. jonboat

    Joanne Guest

    "HeyBub" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > TKnTexas wrote:
    >> Your auditor will want to see the complete ledger, not just the sales
    >> account. When they audit they look at taxes we charge on sales.
    >> However, they also look at the exemptions we claim. They look at the
    >> sales taxes charged on purchases. They actually "find more" in the
    >> purchases than they do in the sales/revenues.

    >
    > They have no claim to examine sales you make to out-of-state clients.


    Colorado auditors uncovered a scam where high-end jewelry was shipped to
    Wyoming to avoid sales tax. I don't have all the facts, but I'm supposing
    the stuff was then sent back to local purchasers.

    So, they do take a close look at sales claimed as exempt from sales tax for
    what ever reason.

    --
    Sincerely,
    Joanne

    If it's right for you, then it's right, . . . . . for you!!!

    http://www.jobird.com
     
    Joanne, Jul 16, 2006
    #8
  9. jonboat

    HeyBub Guest

    Joanne wrote:
    > "HeyBub" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> TKnTexas wrote:
    >>> Your auditor will want to see the complete ledger, not just the
    >>> sales account. When they audit they look at taxes we charge on
    >>> sales. However, they also look at the exemptions we claim. They
    >>> look at the sales taxes charged on purchases. They actually "find
    >>> more" in the purchases than they do in the sales/revenues.

    >>
    >> They have no claim to examine sales you make to out-of-state clients.

    >
    > Colorado auditors uncovered a scam where high-end jewelry was shipped
    > to Wyoming to avoid sales tax. I don't have all the facts, but I'm
    > supposing the stuff was then sent back to local purchasers.
    >
    > So, they do take a close look at sales claimed as exempt from sales
    > tax for what ever reason.


    They take a look at it only because the business permits them to do so.

    There is nothing wrong with a "scam" to avoid taxes if the transaction is
    otherwise legal. Selling stuff to someone in Wyoming where it is, in turn,
    sold back to someone in Colorado is simply creative tax avoidance.

    Years ago, before Texas allowed UPS to operate intrastate, a Texas fruitcake
    maker shipped truckloads of their product to Shreveport, Louisiana where it
    would be put into the UPS system for delivery in Texas. I believe that most
    of those 1970-era fruitcakes are still in circulation.

    Same thing (well, almost).
     
    HeyBub, Jul 17, 2006
    #9
  10. jonboat

    TKnTexas Guest

    Several years ago a business that I was in the process of shutting down
    after seven years of operating received a notice of a sales tax audit,
    a nightclub operation. They wanted copies of the bank statements as
    well as the general ledger. They compared deposits with reported
    sales.

    HeyBub wrote:
    > Joanne wrote:
    > > "HeyBub" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >> TKnTexas wrote:
    > >>> Your auditor will want to see the complete ledger, not just the
    > >>> sales account. When they audit they look at taxes we charge on
    > >>> sales. However, they also look at the exemptions we claim. They
    > >>> look at the sales taxes charged on purchases. They actually "find
    > >>> more" in the purchases than they do in the sales/revenues.
    > >>
    > >> They have no claim to examine sales you make to out-of-state clients.

    > >
    > > Colorado auditors uncovered a scam where high-end jewelry was shipped
    > > to Wyoming to avoid sales tax. I don't have all the facts, but I'm
    > > supposing the stuff was then sent back to local purchasers.
    > >
    > > So, they do take a close look at sales claimed as exempt from sales
    > > tax for what ever reason.

    >
    > They take a look at it only because the business permits them to do so.
    >
    > There is nothing wrong with a "scam" to avoid taxes if the transaction is
    > otherwise legal. Selling stuff to someone in Wyoming where it is, in turn,
    > sold back to someone in Colorado is simply creative tax avoidance.
    >
    > Years ago, before Texas allowed UPS to operate intrastate, a Texas fruitcake
    > maker shipped truckloads of their product to Shreveport, Louisiana where it
    > would be put into the UPS system for delivery in Texas. I believe that most
    > of those 1970-era fruitcakes are still in circulation.
    >
    > Same thing (well, almost).
     
    TKnTexas, Jul 17, 2006
    #10
  11. jonboat

    TKnTexas Guest

    Ahhh.. the famous fruitcake bakery in Corsicana. Not only the best
    fruitcake but everything is great there. I suppose the big question if
    a business is being audited by a state agency is to contact your CPA to
    find out what is obligatory in your particular state. Auditors may ask
    for a lot of stuff that are not necessarily entitle to receive.
    However, once they have it is subject to review.

    HeyBub wrote:
    > Joanne wrote:
    > > "HeyBub" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >> TKnTexas wrote:
    > >>> Your auditor will want to see the complete ledger, not just the
    > >>> sales account. When they audit they look at taxes we charge on
    > >>> sales. However, they also look at the exemptions we claim. They
    > >>> look at the sales taxes charged on purchases. They actually "find
    > >>> more" in the purchases than they do in the sales/revenues.
    > >>
    > >> They have no claim to examine sales you make to out-of-state clients.

    > >
    > > Colorado auditors uncovered a scam where high-end jewelry was shipped
    > > to Wyoming to avoid sales tax. I don't have all the facts, but I'm
    > > supposing the stuff was then sent back to local purchasers.
    > >
    > > So, they do take a close look at sales claimed as exempt from sales
    > > tax for what ever reason.

    >
    > They take a look at it only because the business permits them to do so.
    >
    > There is nothing wrong with a "scam" to avoid taxes if the transaction is
    > otherwise legal. Selling stuff to someone in Wyoming where it is, in turn,
    > sold back to someone in Colorado is simply creative tax avoidance.
    >
    > Years ago, before Texas allowed UPS to operate intrastate, a Texas fruitcake
    > maker shipped truckloads of their product to Shreveport, Louisiana where it
    > would be put into the UPS system for delivery in Texas. I believe that most
    > of those 1970-era fruitcakes are still in circulation.
    >
    > Same thing (well, almost).
     
    TKnTexas, Jul 17, 2006
    #11
  12. jonboat

    Joanne Guest

    "TKnTexas" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Several years ago a business that I was in the process of shutting down
    > after seven years of operating received a notice of a sales tax audit,
    > a nightclub operation. They wanted copies of the bank statements as
    > well as the general ledger. They compared deposits with reported
    > sales.
    >
    > HeyBub wrote:
    >> Joanne wrote:
    >> > "HeyBub" <> wrote in message
    >> > news:...
    >> >> TKnTexas wrote:
    >> >>> Your auditor will want to see the complete ledger, not just the
    >> >>> sales account. When they audit they look at taxes we charge on
    >> >>> sales. However, they also look at the exemptions we claim. They
    >> >>> look at the sales taxes charged on purchases. They actually "find
    >> >>> more" in the purchases than they do in the sales/revenues.
    >> >>
    >> >> They have no claim to examine sales you make to out-of-state clients.
    >> >
    >> > Colorado auditors uncovered a scam where high-end jewelry was shipped
    >> > to Wyoming to avoid sales tax. I don't have all the facts, but I'm
    >> > supposing the stuff was then sent back to local purchasers.
    >> >
    >> > So, they do take a close look at sales claimed as exempt from sales
    >> > tax for what ever reason.

    >>
    >> They take a look at it only because the business permits them to do so.
    >>
    >> There is nothing wrong with a "scam" to avoid taxes if the transaction is
    >> otherwise legal. Selling stuff to someone in Wyoming where it is, in
    >> turn,
    >> sold back to someone in Colorado is simply creative tax avoidance.
    >>
    >> Years ago, before Texas allowed UPS to operate intrastate, a Texas
    >> fruitcake
    >> maker shipped truckloads of their product to Shreveport, Louisiana where
    >> it
    >> would be put into the UPS system for delivery in Texas. I believe that
    >> most
    >> of those 1970-era fruitcakes are still in circulation.
    >>
    >> Same thing (well, almost).



    I don't thing this was resold. I think it was just reshipped.

    --
    Sincerely,
    Joanne

    If it's right for you, then it's right, . . . . . for you!!!

    http://www.jobird.com
     
    Joanne, Jul 17, 2006
    #12
  13. jonboat

    HeyBub Guest

    Joanne wrote:
    >>>
    >>> There is nothing wrong with a "scam" to avoid taxes if the
    >>> transaction is otherwise legal. Selling stuff to someone in Wyoming
    >>> where it is, in turn,
    >>> sold back to someone in Colorado is simply creative tax avoidance.
    >>>
    >>> Years ago, before Texas allowed UPS to operate intrastate, a Texas
    >>> fruitcake
    >>> maker shipped truckloads of their product to Shreveport, Louisiana
    >>> where it
    >>> would be put into the UPS system for delivery in Texas. I believe
    >>> that most
    >>> of those 1970-era fruitcakes are still in circulation.
    >>>
    >>> Same thing (well, almost).

    >
    >
    > I don't thing this was resold. I think it was just reshipped.


    Right. But when merchandise leaves the state, the state no longer has any
    legitimate interest in the stuff.
     
    HeyBub, Jul 18, 2006
    #13
  14. jonboat

    Joanne Guest

    "HeyBub" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Joanne wrote:
    >> I don't thing this was resold. I think it was just reshipped.

    >
    > Right. But when merchandise leaves the state, the state no longer has any
    > legitimate interest in the stuff.


    I don't think that's totally true when a pattern of shipping to a common
    address for various different customers is uncovered. Smells bad and this
    resulted in an investigation of fraud and ultimate collection of lots of
    $$$.

    My experience with auditors is that of the proof of exemption being on the
    seller. Prove it was shipped out of the state, provide a resale account
    number, provide an exempt organization qualifier.

    --
    Sincerely,
    Joanne

    If it's right for you, then it's right, . . . . . for you!!!

    http://www.jobird.com
     
    Joanne, Jul 18, 2006
    #14
  15. HeyBub wrote:
    > TKnTexas wrote:
    >> Your auditor will want to see the complete ledger, not just the sales
    >> account. When they audit they look at taxes we charge on sales.
    >> However, they also look at the exemptions we claim. They look at the
    >> sales taxes charged on purchases. They actually "find more" in the
    >> purchases than they do in the sales/revenues.

    >
    > They have no claim to examine sales you make to out-of-state clients.


    They can look at them all they want to be sure they are in fact out of
    state sales.
     
    Golden California Girls, Jul 18, 2006
    #15
  16. jonboat

    HeyBub Guest

    Joanne wrote:
    > "HeyBub" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Joanne wrote:
    >>> I don't thing this was resold. I think it was just reshipped.

    >>
    >> Right. But when merchandise leaves the state, the state no longer
    >> has any legitimate interest in the stuff.

    >
    > I don't think that's totally true when a pattern of shipping to a
    > common address for various different customers is uncovered. Smells
    > bad and this resulted in an investigation of fraud and ultimate
    > collection of lots of $$$.


    Then the state can go suck eggs. Consolidated shipping to a legally
    qualified "customer" in another state is legal. What that "customer" does
    with the merchandise -- including re-shipping it back to the source state --
    is beyond the oversight of the original state. If the two shippers (the
    original and the re-shipper) are legally distinct entities, such as separate
    corporations with the same stockholders, both states are screwed, legally,
    out of the sales tax.

    >
    > My experience with auditors is that of the proof of exemption being
    > on the seller. Prove it was shipped out of the state, provide a
    > resale account number, provide an exempt organization qualifier.


    Yep.
     
    HeyBub, Jul 18, 2006
    #16
  17. HeyBub wrote:
    > Then the state can go suck eggs. Consolidated shipping to a legally
    > qualified "customer" in another state is legal. What that "customer" does
    > with the merchandise -- including re-shipping it back to the source state --
    > is beyond the oversight of the original state. If the two shippers (the
    > original and the re-shipper) are legally distinct entities, such as separate
    > corporations with the same stockholders, both states are screwed, legally,
    > out of the sales tax.
    >


    What's your Bar number?
     
    Golden California Girls, Jul 18, 2006
    #17
  18. jonboat

    HeyBub Guest

    Golden California Girls wrote:
    > HeyBub wrote:
    >> Then the state can go suck eggs. Consolidated shipping to a legally
    >> qualified "customer" in another state is legal. What that "customer"
    >> does with the merchandise -- including re-shipping it back to the
    >> source state -- is beyond the oversight of the original state. If
    >> the two shippers (the original and the re-shipper) are legally
    >> distinct entities, such as separate corporations with the same
    >> stockholders, both states are screwed, legally, out of the sales tax.
    >>

    >
    > What's your Bar number?


    I haven't paid my Bar Association dues in over 30 years.

    Why do you ask?
     
    HeyBub, Jul 18, 2006
    #18
  19. HeyBub wrote:
    > Golden California Girls wrote:
    >> HeyBub wrote:
    >>> Then the state can go suck eggs. Consolidated shipping to a legally
    >>> qualified "customer" in another state is legal. What that "customer"
    >>> does with the merchandise -- including re-shipping it back to the
    >>> source state -- is beyond the oversight of the original state. If
    >>> the two shippers (the original and the re-shipper) are legally
    >>> distinct entities, such as separate corporations with the same
    >>> stockholders, both states are screwed, legally, out of the sales tax.
    >>>

    >> What's your Bar number?

    >
    > I haven't paid my Bar Association dues in over 30 years.
    >
    > Why do you ask?


    Wondering why you were giving legal advice, because this is clearly
    legal advice, not accounting advice. And you are sure this is valid no
    matter which pairs of the 50 states you pick? That none have perhaps
    enacted co-ownership rules that might require tax to be paid. Oh and
    how does this all impact income tax? Speaking of that, what would be up
    as far as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act if say the corporations in the two
    different states were both held by a shell that was publicly traded?
    Just some questions since you are dispensing legal advice.
     
    Golden California Girls, Jul 19, 2006
    #19
  20. jonboat

    HeyBub Guest

    Golden California Girls wrote:
    >
    > Wondering why you were giving legal advice, because this is clearly
    > legal advice, not accounting advice.


    Virtually all advice has legal ramifications. For example: "May I suggest
    fries with that?" can be construed as an "attractive nusiance."

    > And you are sure this is valid
    > no matter which pairs of the 50 states you pick?


    Pretty sure. That one state legislature could enact laws binding on citizens
    of another state is pretty much intolerable (with the obvious exception of
    the "full faith and credit" clause pertaining to judicial decisions and laws
    of status).

    > That none have
    > perhaps enacted co-ownership rules that might require tax to be paid.
    > Oh and how does this all impact income tax?


    State income tax? I don't know. The only cross-border income tax I know is
    New York taxing the retirement income of (now) citizens of Florida. (It's
    the classic "greedy bastards" vs. "tax evaders" conundrum.)

    > Speaking of that, what
    > would be up as far as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act if say the corporations
    > in the two different states were both held by a shell that was
    > publicly traded? Just some questions since you are dispensing legal
    > advice.


    That's easy. Companies that use QB are, in the main, supremely indifferent
    to SOX (mainly because SOX governs the financial oversight of public
    companies).
     
    HeyBub, Jul 19, 2006
    #20
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