Credit: CCJ - certificate of satisfaction

Discussion in 'UK Finance' started by deejaypaulr@gmail.com, Sep 28, 2005.

  1. Guest

    I have a CCJ from about two years ago which I paid off in installments.
    I have copies of my credit report from the three agencies which show
    this. These credit reports also state that I should obtain a
    certificate of satisfaction from the court, and send this to the
    agency, which they will mark against the CCJ entry.

    I have obtained a letter from the debtor confirming that the debt has
    been paid in full, and I need to send this to the court together with
    £10 for them to issue a certificate of satifaction.

    However, will this be a waste of time/money? Basically i'm trying to
    improve my credit rating, but do companies see that the CCJ has had a
    certificate of satisfaction and take this into account, or do they just
    see a CCJ regardless of whether it has been paid or not? In other
    words, will obtaining a certificate of satifaction improve my credit
    rating at all?

    Many thanks,

    Paul
     
    , Sep 28, 2005
    #1
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  2. wrote:

    > However, will this be a waste of time/money? Basically i'm trying to
    > improve my credit rating, but do companies see that the CCJ has had a
    > certificate of satisfaction and take this into account, or do they just
    > see a CCJ regardless of whether it has been paid or not? In other
    > words, will obtaining a certificate of satifaction improve my credit
    > rating at all?


    Good point.

    Though it will show the debt as discharged, and this will no doubt count
    in your favour to *some* extent, of far more interest to potential lenders
    is the fact that you fell into arrears in the first place, which will put
    them off. Granted, it will put them off more if the judgement is still
    not satisfied, but before they read that far, they've already had their
    first impression.
     
    Ronald Raygun, Sep 28, 2005
    #2
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  3. Paul R Guest

    Well that's my question really, do potential lenders actually look into
    whether a judgement is satisfied (or do they even get that information
    when they do a credit check), or do they only see that there is a CCJ
    there?
     
    Paul R, Sep 28, 2005
    #3
  4. Paul R wrote:

    > Well that's my question really, do potential lenders actually look into
    > whether a judgement is satisfied (or do they even get that information
    > when they do a credit check), or do they only see that there is a CCJ
    > there?


    I don't know. I'm just saying that *even if* they see it, once they've
    seen the CCJ at all, you're as good as done for. If that is so, your
    question becomes almost pointless.
     
    Ronald Raygun, Sep 28, 2005
    #4
  5. Paul R Guest

    Hmmm, you are right there...so in effect it's a waste of time updating
    my credit file then?
     
    Paul R, Sep 28, 2005
    #5
  6. -=D@n=- Guest

    Paul R wrote:
    > Hmmm, you are right there...so in effect it's a waste of time updating
    > my credit file then?


    I would disagree. I had a default (I know, not as bad as a CCJ) that showed
    on my credit file when applying for a mortgage with a major lender. I sent a
    letter with the mortgage application explaining what had happened, and they
    accepted it and gave me a mortgage at their most preferable rate.

    There's not much effort in updating your file, and the £10 charge could well
    be swallowed up if a lender decides to offer you a better rate because they
    see you've satisfied the CCJ.

    Just my tuppence worth.
     
    -=D@n=-, Sep 28, 2005
    #6
  7. Tim Guest

    > Paul R wrote:
    > > Hmmm, you are right there...so in effect it's
    > > a waste of time updating my credit file then?

    >


    "-=D@n=-" wrote
    > I would disagree. I had a default (I know, not as bad as a CCJ) that

    showed
    > on my credit file when applying for a mortgage with a major lender. I sent
    > a letter with the mortgage application explaining what had happened, and
    > they accepted it and gave me a mortgage at their most preferable rate.
    >
    > There's not much effort in updating your file, and the £10
    > charge could well be swallowed up if a lender decides to offer
    > you a better rate because they see you've satisfied the CCJ.


    Just a thought - under the DPA, don't the credit reference agencies **have
    to** correct a file if it is incorrect, for *free*?

    So OP might be able to get away without paying the £10 fee - he simply tells
    the CRAs that the CCJ *is* satisfied, and that their file holds **incorrect
    data** - they'll then need to either show that it is *not* incorrect, or
    correct it.
    If it *is* satisfied (as the OP knows it is), then they won't be able to
    show that the data isn't incorrect, will they?! ... So they'll then need to
    update it - for *free*!!
     
    Tim, Sep 28, 2005
    #7
  8. john boyle Guest

    In message <dheh0g$b4a$-infra.bt.com>, Tim
    <> writes
    >> Paul R wrote:


    >So OP might be able to get away without paying the £10 fee - he simply tells
    >the CRAs that the CCJ *is* satisfied, and that their file holds **incorrect
    >data** - they'll then need to either show that it is *not* incorrect, or
    >correct it.
    >If it *is* satisfied (as the OP knows it is), then they won't be able to
    >show that the data isn't incorrect, will they?! ... So they'll then need to
    >update it - for *free*!!


    The data wouldnt be incorrect. It will show a county court judgement.
    That is a matter of fact and is correct even if it has been subsequently
    satisfied.
    --
    John Boyle
     
    john boyle, Sep 28, 2005
    #8
  9. Paul R Guest

    Thanks for your help guys. From that I think I might as well pay the
    £10 fee if it will make a small difference.

    john boyle wrote:
    > In message <dheh0g$b4a$-infra.bt.com>, Tim
    > <> writes
    > >> Paul R wrote:

    >
    > >So OP might be able to get away without paying the £10 fee - he simplytells
    > >the CRAs that the CCJ *is* satisfied, and that their file holds **incorrect
    > >data** - they'll then need to either show that it is *not* incorrect, or
    > >correct it.
    > >If it *is* satisfied (as the OP knows it is), then they won't be able to
    > >show that the data isn't incorrect, will they?! ... So they'll then needto
    > >update it - for *free*!!

    >
    > The data wouldnt be incorrect. It will show a county court judgement.
    > That is a matter of fact and is correct even if it has been subsequently
    > satisfied.
    > --
    > John Boyle
     
    Paul R, Sep 28, 2005
    #9
  10. Tim Guest

    > "Tim" wrote
    > >So OP might be able to get away without paying the £10
    > >fee - he simply tells the CRAs that the CCJ *is* satisfied,
    > >and that their file holds **incorrect data** - they'll then
    > >need to either show that it is *not* incorrect, or correct it.
    > >If it *is* satisfied (as the OP knows it is), then they
    > >won't be able to show that the data isn't incorrect, will
    > >they?! ... So they'll then need to update it - for *free*!!

    >

    john boyle wrote:
    > The data wouldnt be incorrect.


    It would be incomplete, and therefore misleading.

    john boyle wrote:
    > It will show a county court judgement.
    > That is a matter of fact and is correct
    > even if it has been subsequently satisfied.


    True, but the credit file *also* has a field for "date satisfied". If that
    field is blank - as it would be - then this indicates to any reader that it
    *hasn't* been satisfied. That's blatantly incorrect.
     
    Tim, Sep 29, 2005
    #10
  11. petec77 Guest

    Hi,

    About 8 years ago, I got into a whole pile of debt Aprrox £45000, I
    had 3 CCj's associated with this debt and paid off 2 off them and lest
    the third due to not being able to deal with the Abbey's un helpful
    style.

    The bottom line is this,

    I would not have paid any of them off at all, it makes no difference to
    your credit rating, the only thing you can do is wait 6 years until
    they drop off your credit file whether paid up or not.
     
    petec77, Oct 7, 2005
    #11
  12. "petec77" <> wrote in message
    news:...

    >I would not have paid any of them off at all, it makes no difference to
    >your credit rating, the only thing you can do is wait 6 years until
    >they drop off your credit file whether paid up or not.


    Is that the only relevant issue ?
     
    Fergus O'Rourke, Oct 23, 2005
    #12
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