Diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome

Discussion in 'UK Tax Credits and Benefits' started by Never Mind..., Feb 7, 2010.

  1. I have been diagnosed Asperger Syndrome and was wondering what benefits i.e.
    DLA ect i will be entitled to as it is a hidden disability.
     
    Never Mind..., Feb 7, 2010
    #1
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  2. Never Mind...

    Guest

    On Feb 7, 12:08 pm, "Never Mind..."
    <> wrote:
    > I have been diagnosed Asperger Syndrome and was wondering what benefits i..e.
    > DLA ect i will be entitled to as it is a hidden disability.


    For DLA it is not the name of the illness/disability that is
    important. If you have mobility/care needs you may be successful with
    a claim for DLA.
     
    , Feb 7, 2010
    #2
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  3. Never Mind...

    Colin Wilson Guest

    > I have been diagnosed Asperger Syndrome and was wondering what
    > benefits i.e. DLA ect i will be entitled to as it is a hidden
    > disability.


    Not sure on the benefits front, but have you looked to see if there
    are any support groups locally ?

    It's quite closely related to ADHD, and many kids with ADHD have a
    dual-diagnosis of aspergers - it also seems to be familial (i.e.
    there's a good chance you won't be the only one in your immediate
    family with it)

    Out of interest, how old are you, and do you / have you worked ?

    Just because you have aspergers doesn't mean you can't work - i'm
    currently undergoing an adult assessment for it myself, and i've
    worked full time for almost 25 years now since I left school.

    There are several online forums that might also be of use to help
    learn coping strategies / share experiences - I currently hang around
    on http://www.psychforums.com - there's a dedicated aspie forum on
    there :)
     
    Colin Wilson, Feb 7, 2010
    #3
  4. Never Mind...

    Ben Short Guest

    "Colin Wilson" <> wrote in message
    news:-september.org...
    >> I have been diagnosed Asperger Syndrome and was wondering what
    >> benefits i.e. DLA ect i will be entitled to as it is a hidden
    >> disability.

    >
    > Not sure on the benefits front, but have you looked to see if there
    > are any support groups locally ?
    >
    > It's quite closely related to ADHD, and many kids with ADHD have a
    > dual-diagnosis of aspergers - it also seems to be familial (i.e.
    > there's a good chance you won't be the only one in your immediate
    > family with it)
    >
    > Out of interest, how old are you, and do you / have you worked ?
    >
    > Just because you have aspergers doesn't mean you can't work - i'm
    > currently undergoing an adult assessment for it myself, and i've
    > worked full time for almost 25 years now since I left school.
    >
    > There are several online forums that might also be of use to help
    > learn coping strategies / share experiences - I currently hang around
    > on http://www.psychforums.com - there's a dedicated aspie forum on
    > there :)



    I am 38 and was late diagnosed with ASP 6 years ago. I need a lot of care,
    especially when I am out. I get the middle rate DLA and Lower rate care.
    Colin, not for one second am I questioning your post but I have never heard
    of this link between asp and ADHD, is there some links you can point me
    towards. Also nobody in my family has or has ever had aspergers, I would
    also like some details on the family links too. I am convinced my son has it
    but no matter who I speak to they tell me there is no connection to family
    so I would like to prove them wrong.

    I am not questioning your info Colin, merely wondering if I could look into
    it more. Thanks
     
    Ben Short, Feb 9, 2010
    #4
  5. Never Mind...

    Colin Wilson Guest

    > I am 38 and was late diagnosed with ASP 6 years ago. I need a lot of care,
    > especially when I am out. I get the middle rate DLA and Lower rate care.
    > Colin, not for one second am I questioning your post but I have never heard
    > of this link between asp and ADHD, is there some links you can point me
    > towards. Also nobody in my family has or has ever had aspergers, I would
    > also like some details on the family links too. I am convinced my son has it
    > but no matter who I speak to they tell me there is no connection to family
    > so I would like to prove them wrong.


    Aspergers has only started to be recognised over the last 15 years or
    so, and although there's no "official" consensus that i'm aware of, it
    does appear as though there are strong familial links in the people
    i've come across with ADHD - several of whom have children with a dual
    ADHD / Aspergers diagnosis.

    A quick search for "aspergers familial" brings up several links that
    might be of interest - that search term offers;

    <http://www.springerlink.com/content/g112rp6013523t57/>

    which says...

    "About 50% of all boys with AS have a paternal family history of
    autism spectrum disorder. Pre- and perinatal risks appear to be
    important in about 25% cases."

    This looks like quite a useful comparison between symptoms of ADHD
    and aspergers;

    <http://www.addandadhd.co.uk/adhd-aspergers-syndrome.html>

    From what i've read, there seems to be a much higher incidence of
    aspergers being diagnosed in boys than girls, but social factors
    might mask this to some extent - as they mature, a girl is often in
    a "submissive" role when it comes to relationships, so issues
    regarding intimacy are less obvious as their partner makes all the
    moves.

    Just while i'm on that side of things, there's another "aspie-alike"
    condition known as "love shyness" which is essentially everything you
    know about aspergers, but on a personal relationship level - where
    the sufferer may not otherwise show "aspie" symptoms in day-to-day
    life.

    There is thought to be about a 40% co-morbid ("at the same time")
    incidence of love shyness in people with aspergers. I suspect I have
    both unfortunately :-}

    > I am not questioning your info Colin, merely wondering if I could look into
    > it more. Thanks


    No worries - i'm still new to this game myself, and trying to get to
    grips with things "as I see them"
     
    Colin Wilson, Feb 10, 2010
    #5
  6. Never Mind...

    Ben Short Guest

    "Colin Wilson" <> wrote in message
    news:-september.org...
    >> I am 38 and was late diagnosed with ASP 6 years ago. I need a lot of
    >> care,
    >> especially when I am out. I get the middle rate DLA and Lower rate care.
    >> Colin, not for one second am I questioning your post but I have never
    >> heard
    >> of this link between asp and ADHD, is there some links you can point me
    >> towards. Also nobody in my family has or has ever had aspergers, I would
    >> also like some details on the family links too. I am convinced my son has
    >> it
    >> but no matter who I speak to they tell me there is no connection to
    >> family
    >> so I would like to prove them wrong.

    >
    > Aspergers has only started to be recognised over the last 15 years or
    > so, and although there's no "official" consensus that i'm aware of, it
    > does appear as though there are strong familial links in the people
    > i've come across with ADHD - several of whom have children with a dual
    > ADHD / Aspergers diagnosis.
    >
    > A quick search for "aspergers familial" brings up several links that
    > might be of interest - that search term offers;
    >
    > <http://www.springerlink.com/content/g112rp6013523t57/>
    >
    > which says...
    >
    > "About 50% of all boys with AS have a paternal family history of
    > autism spectrum disorder. Pre- and perinatal risks appear to be
    > important in about 25% cases."
    >
    > This looks like quite a useful comparison between symptoms of ADHD
    > and aspergers;
    >
    > <http://www.addandadhd.co.uk/adhd-aspergers-syndrome.html>
    >
    > From what i've read, there seems to be a much higher incidence of
    > aspergers being diagnosed in boys than girls, but social factors
    > might mask this to some extent - as they mature, a girl is often in
    > a "submissive" role when it comes to relationships, so issues
    > regarding intimacy are less obvious as their partner makes all the
    > moves.
    >
    > Just while i'm on that side of things, there's another "aspie-alike"
    > condition known as "love shyness" which is essentially everything you
    > know about aspergers, but on a personal relationship level - where
    > the sufferer may not otherwise show "aspie" symptoms in day-to-day
    > life.
    >
    > There is thought to be about a 40% co-morbid ("at the same time")
    > incidence of love shyness in people with aspergers. I suspect I have
    > both unfortunately :-}
    >
    >> I am not questioning your info Colin, merely wondering if I could look
    >> into
    >> it more. Thanks

    >
    > No worries - i'm still new to this game myself, and trying to get to
    > grips with things "as I see them"


    Thanks for the info Colin, much obliged to you, I will have a read up.

    I have suffered all my life from Aspergers but only really recently been
    officially diagnosed with it. My son does display some of the symptoms I
    have become familiar with and although they are not giving him an official
    diagnosis, they are keeping their eye on it.

    I hope you get sorted and if you need any advice Colin feel free to ask. I
    know I am different, I have always been shy of the fact, but now I am dying
    of cancer I have come to the conclusion that people should accept me for who
    I am, different to the norm or not. It's just a pity its taken me so long to
    realise that.

    Regards
     
    Ben Short, Feb 10, 2010
    #6
  7. Never Mind...

    Colin Wilson Guest

    > I have suffered all my life from Aspergers but only really recently been
    > officially diagnosed with it. My son does display some of the symptoms I
    > have become familiar with and although they are not giving him an official
    > diagnosis, they are keeping their eye on it.


    As the shrink said to me, there are different types of behaviour -
    innate and learned... they probably need time to figure out whether
    he's picked up some of your traits, or whether he exhibits them
    "himself"

    > I hope you get sorted and if you need any advice Colin feel free to ask. I
    > know I am different, I have always been shy of the fact, but now I am dying
    > of cancer I have come to the conclusion that people should accept me for who
    > I am, different to the norm or not. It's just a pity its taken me so long to
    > realise that.


    Sorry to hear about the cancer - life deals a few of us a shit hand,
    but being able to hold your head up in the face of adversity is a
    sign of strength, and you're doing a far better job of it that I
    could by the sounds of it...

    I did try to email you off-group last night but discovered the
    supanet address doesn't exist - if you'd like to drop me a line,
    rearrage the following lines into something resembling an email
    address (start at the bottom) :-}

    ..co.uk
    @phoenixbbs
    newsgroup
     
    Colin Wilson, Feb 10, 2010
    #7
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