Haven't filed previous year taxes, and lost w2's

Discussion in 'Tax' started by rem240sx, Apr 21, 2004.

  1. rem240sx

    rem240sx Guest

    Ok filed this years taxes and me and my wife have come to
    the realization that through our own stupidity and dumb
    procrastination, our taxes for the past two years were never
    sent in. during the first year of which we probably owe
    some money and obviously the penalties and interest. Last
    year our financial situation is pretty much unchanged from
    this year so we might be in a position to receive a refund
    from that year as we did this year. The problem lies in the
    fact that I can't find our tax information in our paperwork
    files as of yet. I know I can download all appropiate froms
    other than obtaining my w2's. The company I worked for in
    the first year of unfiled taxes is no longer in business and
    hasn't been in business for some time.

    Now for the question, How do I go about obtaining the w2
    information from that year since I have no way of contacting
    that ex employer. I read somewhere about obtaining the info
    from SSA or something but lost the site information where I
    found it. I also remember reading somewhere that this can be
    done but state info is omitted in that case, unfortunately I
    will need to file those respective state returns also, how
    do I go about obtaining that info for the state of MD.
    Hopefully someone that is smarter or more experienced than
    me can help me get out of the mess I have created for me and
    my wife. Thanks in advance for any info anyone might have.

    << ------------------------------------------------->>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting >>
    << messages to this newsgroup are at www.asktax.org >>
    << ------------------------------------------------->>
     
    rem240sx, Apr 21, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. rem240sx at wrote:

    > Ok filed this years taxes and me and my wife have come to
    > the realization that through our own stupidity and dumb
    > procrastination, our taxes for the past two years were never
    > sent in.


    If you don't file, there is NO statute of limitations. You
    are fair game forever.

    > during the first year of which we probably owe
    > some money and obviously the penalties and interest. Last
    > year our financial situation is pretty much unchanged from
    > this year so we might be in a position to receive a refund
    > from that year as we did this year. The problem lies in the
    > fact that I can't find our tax information in our paperwork
    > files as of yet. I know I can download all appropiate froms
    > other than obtaining my w2's. The company I worked for in
    > the first year of unfiled taxes is no longer in business and
    > hasn't been in business for some time.


    Use your December pay statement and estimate the W2. You
    can make your own W-2 as a substitute for the missing one.
    All the appropriate numbers should be on there. If the W-2s
    were filed and you had enough income to need to file, the
    IRS may be on your trail already. It generally takes a year
    or more after the filing deadline.

    All freely provided advice guarantee correct or double your
    money back

    Frank S. Duke, Jr. CPA
    Cincinnati, OH USA

    << ------------------------------------------------->>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting >>
    << messages to this newsgroup are at www.asktax.org >>
    << ------------------------------------------------->>
     
    Frank S. Duke, Jr., Apr 23, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. rem240sx

    Barney Bird Guest

    "rem240sx" <> wrote:

    > Now for the question, how do I go about obtaining the
    > W-2 information from that year since I have no way of
    > contacting that ex employer. I read somewhere about
    > obtaining the info from SSA or something...
    >
    > Hopefully someone that is smarter or more experienced
    > than me can help me get out of the mess...


    You can be Dumb and I'll be Dumber. However, being as I'm
    more experienced than you, I can tell you how you easily can
    obtain copies of your prior year Forms W-2. Pay the
    customer service staff in your local IRS walk-in office a
    visit. Make sure you take picture ID with you. A driver's
    license will do. Since I assume you also need copies of
    your wife's Forms W-2, she will need to accompany you and
    take her own picture ID- or she can make her own separate
    trip if that's more convenient. Depending upon how brisk
    business is when you arrive, you may have to take a number
    and have a seat until called. The wait usually is less than
    20 minutes. When you're called to the customer service
    window, tell the IRS representative that you need him or her
    to print out copies of your prior year Forms W-2 so that you
    can get your delinquent prior year returns filed. The IRS
    representative should be able to make the copies for you
    while you're at the window. IRS does not charge for making
    copies of Forms W-2 from its information returns database.
    The appearance and format of the IRS-furnished copies are
    different than the Forms W-2 you're used to getting directly
    from your employer but they're perfectly acceptable for
    filing.

    One downside to the copies provided by IRS is that they do
    not include any state wage information.

    When you're ready to file your prior year returns, enclose
    each year in a separate envelope, or file them in person at
    the walk-in office. Make sure you and your wife both sign
    the returns, preferably in blue ink, and include copies of
    all Forms W-2. It's important that you retain your own
    copies of everything you file with IRS.

    Locations and addresses of IRS walk-in offices are available
    from the link below.

    http://www.irs.gov/localcontacts/index.html

    Good luck to you.

    Barney Byrd

    << ------------------------------------------------->>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting >>
    << messages to this newsgroup are at www.asktax.org >>
    << ------------------------------------------------->>
     
    Barney Bird, Apr 23, 2004
    #3
  4. rem240sx

    Bob Sandler Guest

    > Make sure you and your wife both sign
    > the returns, preferably in blue ink


    Why is blue ink preferable?

    << ------------------------------------------------->>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting >>
    << messages to this newsgroup are at www.asktax.org >>
    << ------------------------------------------------->>
     
    Bob Sandler, Apr 26, 2004
    #4
  5. >> Make sure you and your wife both sign
    >> the returns, preferably in blue ink


    > Why is blue ink preferable?


    So it doesn't look like a photocopied signature?

    << ------------------------------------------------->>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting >>
    << messages to this newsgroup are at www.asktax.org >>
    << ------------------------------------------------->>
     
    Arthur L. Rubin, Apr 27, 2004
    #5
  6. > Make sure you and your wife both sign
    >> the returns, preferably in blue ink


    > Why is blue ink preferable?


    That shows it is an orginial signature, not a copied one.
    When I have the opportunity to submit an IRS expense report
    (I was on an advisory board and I do teach for them) we had
    to sign in anything but red or black. Purple was my
    favorite, but they prefer blue.

    Helen, EA in PA
    Member of The Tax Gang
    Director, National Assoication of Enrolled Agents
    Immediate Past President, PA Society of Enrolled Agents

    << ------------------------------------------------->>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting >>
    << messages to this newsgroup are at www.asktax.org >>
    << ------------------------------------------------->>
     
    Helen P. OPlanick EA, Apr 27, 2004
    #6
  7. rem240sx

    MTW Guest

    Bob Sandler <> wrote:

    > Why is blue ink preferable?


    Simply so that "original" signatures can be easily
    distinguished from "photocopies." The color doesn't matter
    as long as it isn't black. I often like to sign in RED
    (representing blood, or a loss, take your pick <g>).

    MTW

    << ------------------------------------------------->>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting >>
    << messages to this newsgroup are at www.asktax.org >>
    << ------------------------------------------------->>
     
    MTW, Apr 27, 2004
    #7
  8. Bob Sandler wrote:

    >> Make sure you and your wife both sign
    >> the returns, preferably in blue ink


    > Why is blue ink preferable?


    Because any colour really except black will signify which is
    the original return. All copies come out black anyway.

    Unless of course you're rich and can afford one of those
    new fangled colour copiers.

    Cheer$,
    Harlan Lunsford, EA n LA

    << ------------------------------------------------->>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting >>
    << messages to this newsgroup are at www.asktax.org >>
    << ------------------------------------------------->>
     
    Harlan Lunsford, Apr 27, 2004
    #8
  9. >> Make sure you and your wife both sign
    >> the returns, preferably in blue ink


    > Why is blue ink preferable?


    It used to be, years ago, that black ink was preferred for
    signatures -- and I don't know why. Nowadays, with copiers
    so very good, blue ink is (supposed to be) a way to tell
    copies from originals.

    But -- ever heard of color copies? <g>

    Catherine

    << ------------------------------------------------->>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting >>
    << messages to this newsgroup are at www.asktax.org >>
    << ------------------------------------------------->>
     
    Catherine White, Apr 27, 2004
    #9
  10. rem240sx

    Barney Bird Guest

    "Bob Sandler" <> wrote:

    > Why is blue ink preferable?


    Because the employees at the IRS service centers have been
    known to mistake signatures in black ink for photocopies.

    Barney Byrd

    << ------------------------------------------------->>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting >>
    << messages to this newsgroup are at www.asktax.org >>
    << ------------------------------------------------->>
     
    Barney Bird, Apr 30, 2004
    #10
  11. >>> Make sure you and your wife both sign
    >>> the returns, preferably in blue ink


    >> Why is blue ink preferable?


    > So it doesn't look like a photocopied signature?


    Oh, so red is out of the question?

    Stu

    << ------------------------------------------------->>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting >>
    << messages to this newsgroup are at www.asktax.org >>
    << ------------------------------------------------->>
     
    Stuart O. Bronstein, Apr 30, 2004
    #11
  12. rem240sx

    D. Stussy Guest

    Helen P. OPlanick EA wrote:
    >> Make sure you and your wife both sign
    >>> the returns, preferably in blue ink


    >> Why is blue ink preferable?


    > That shows it is an orginial signature, not a copied one.
    > When I have the opportunity to submit an IRS expense report
    > (I was on an advisory board and I do teach for them) we had
    > to sign in anything but red or black. Purple was my
    > favorite, but they prefer blue.


    I wonder what the IRS has to say about color photocopiers.... :)

    Can't use blue ink? Definently can't use red, green, or
    black? I guess that leaves CRAYONS. :)

    << ------------------------------------------------->>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting >>
    << messages to this newsgroup are at www.asktax.org >>
    << ------------------------------------------------->>
     
    D. Stussy, Apr 30, 2004
    #12
  13. rem240sx

    D. Stussy Guest

    >>>> Make sure you and your wife both sign
    >>>> the returns, preferably in blue ink


    >>> Why is blue ink preferable?


    >> So it doesn't look like a photocopied signature?


    > Oh, so red is out of the question?


    They (the IRS clerks) use red and green and purple. They
    left blue for us.

    However, CRAYON isn't out of the question either! I am not
    necessarily recommending it.... ;-)

    << ------------------------------------------------->>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting >>
    << messages to this newsgroup are at www.asktax.org >>
    << ------------------------------------------------->>
     
    D. Stussy, May 3, 2004
    #13
  14. rem240sx

    TaxmanHog Guest

    >> Why is blue ink preferable?
    >> That shows it is an original signature, not a copied one.
    >> When I have the opportunity to submit an IRS expense report
    >> (I was on an advisory board and I do teach for them) we had
    >> to sign in anything but red or black. Purple was my
    >> favorite, but they prefer blue.


    > I wonder what the IRS has to say about color photocopiers.... :)
    > Can't use blue ink? Definitely can't use red, green, or
    > black? I guess that leaves CRAYONS. :)


    With today's technology, you would think it's moot.

    The intention is to minimize potential for FRAUD, often
    returns which are filed late are those which have
    substantial balance of tax due & unpaid, who signs in the
    case of joint income tax returns can be a concern to the
    Spouse who did not like the fact that He/She might be liable
    for a tax debt which was caused by improperly managed
    finances of the other spouse (typically small business,
    scorps Sole prop's & partners).

    Of course the "INJURED" term used loosely, should file
    their own return immediately as married filing separate.
    This puts a MARK in the master file which indicates their
    individual compliance, and by the time the RESPONSIBLE
    spouse {also used loosely}, decides it's time to file the
    now delinquent return (DRAFT version computed with joint
    income, and tries to FORGE INJURED spouses signature (with
    today's technology becoming even easier to do) entrapping
    this person into the others person tax debt.

    In the case of business taxes, in particular PAYROLL taxes,
    who signs might (not always) indicate a party responsible
    for non payment of payroll taxes.

    I occasionally feel the back of the page for the embossment
    which occurs when a REAL signature in any color ink is
    applied to the page.

    Having the signature on a KNOWN photo copy (pink/red) form
    941 is what I see often in a contrasting color simply &
    quickly indicates that it's a LIVE signature.

    Also the color restriction are more related to machine
    imaging issues, several years ago when I was running the
    document scanners, the machine that was used to scan
    1096/1099 use a RED hue light which caused the "BLIND INK" =
    "RED INK" to disappear this allowed the OPTICS of the
    scanner to only see the information {name, TIN, and other
    provided info}

    The machine with a greenish/blue colored light, was used to
    scan 1040EZ & 8109 coupons

    << ------------------------------------------------->>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting >>
    << messages to this newsgroup are at www.asktax.org >>
    << ------------------------------------------------->>
     
    TaxmanHog, May 3, 2004
    #14
  15. rem240sx

    D. Stussy Guest

    >>> Why is blue ink preferable?
    >>> That shows it is an original signature, not a copied one.
    >>> When I have the opportunity to submit an IRS expense report
    >>> (I was on an advisory board and I do teach for them) we had
    >>> to sign in anything but red or black. Purple was my
    >>> favorite, but they prefer blue.


    >> I wonder what the IRS has to say about color photocopiers.... :)
    >> Can't use blue ink? Definitely can't use red, green, or
    >> black? I guess that leaves CRAYONS. :)


    > With today's technology, you would think it's moot.
    >
    > The intention is to minimize potential for FRAUD, often
    > returns which are filed late are those which have
    > substantial balance of tax due & unpaid, who signs in the
    > case of joint income tax returns can be a concern to the
    > Spouse who did not like the fact that He/She might be liable
    > for a tax debt which was caused by improperly managed
    > finances of the other spouse (typically small business,
    > scorps Sole prop's & partners).


    "Often returns which are filed late are ....": How did you
    arrive at that conclusion?

    This year, after the normal season, I prepared a return for
    a friend where the taxpayer was a deceased relative of his.
    The IRS had asked for the back year return (2001), and when
    I got done with it, the gross income was under the filing
    threshold. The IRS should never have bothered, but did so
    because they are under the mistaken impression that gross
    proceeds, not net gain (or loss) on capital sales
    constitutes gross income. They need to go back and re-read
    the IRC (Section 61(a)(3) says "gains", not proceeds). If
    my friend hadn't filed for his relative, the IRS would have
    to pull the broker's statement in order to meet their burden
    of proof before the Tax Court (eventually), but would also
    discover the basis by doing so, and thus "shoot themselves
    in the foot." The decedent had nothing withheld, so there
    was no need to have filed earlier.

    Therefore, I can equally say: Often returns are late filed
    because they are not required to be filed at all.

    > Of course the "INJURED" term used loosely, should file
    > their own return immediately as married filing separate.
    > This puts a MARK in the master file which indicates their
    > individual compliance, and by the time the RESPONSIBLE
    > spouse {also used loosely}, decides it's time to file the
    > now delinquent return (DRAFT version computed with joint
    > income, and tries to FORGE INJURED spouses signature (with
    > today's technology becoming even easier to do) entrapping
    > this person into the others person tax debt.


    I find that often, the TRULY injured have other things on
    their minds than their tax obligations.....

    > In the case of business taxes, in particular PAYROLL taxes,
    > who signs might (not always) indicate a party responsible
    > for non payment of payroll taxes.


    That I will agree with.

    > I occasionally feel the back of the page for the embossment
    > which occurs when a REAL signature in any color ink is
    > applied to the page.


    If you're looking for a depression, if the paper were signed
    directly against a hard surface, the back will still be flat
    and smooth. I don't see how that would be indicative of
    anything.

    << ------------------------------------------------->>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting >>
    << messages to this newsgroup are at www.asktax.org >>
    << ------------------------------------------------->>
     
    D. Stussy, May 4, 2004
    #15
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. jkperez

    prior year taxes filed

    jkperez, Apr 21, 2004, in forum: Tax
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    294
    Michael S. Rosen
    Apr 23, 2004
  2. LB
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    522
    Condor
    Jun 28, 2008
  3. Guest
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    472
    D. Stussy
    Jul 16, 2003
  4. Maria
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    312
    Fergus O'Rourke
    Mar 16, 2009
  5. Replies:
    0
    Views:
    535
Loading...

Share This Page