how to report ssi on parents tax return

Discussion in 'Tax' started by bakern, Apr 4, 2010.

  1. bakern

    bakern Guest

    Parents elect to report dependant (12 years old) income on their tax return.
    The dependant receives SSI due to parent's disability (also collecting SSI).

    Where do we report the dependant's SSI income on the parent's return?
    Tia
    Neil

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    bakern, Apr 4, 2010
    #1
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  2. In article <sa6un.121354$>,
    bakern <> wrote:
    >Parents elect to report dependant (12 years old) income on their tax return.
    >The dependant receives SSI due to parent's disability (also collecting SSI).
    >
    >Where do we report the dependant's SSI income on the parent's return?



    Supplemental Security Income (ssi) is not taxable. Do not report it.
    --

    ArtKamlet at a o l dot c o m Columbus OH K2PZH

    --
    << ------------------------------------------------------- >>
    << The foregoing was not intended or written to be used, >>
    << nor can it used, for the purpose of avoiding penalties >>
    << that may be imposed upon the taxpayer. >>
    << >>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting posts >>
    << to this newsgroup as well as our anti-spamming policy >>
    << are at www.asktax.org. >>
    << Copyright (2007) - All rights reserved. >>
    << ------------------------------------------------------- >>
     
    Arthur Kamlet, Apr 5, 2010
    #2
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  3. bakern

    Phil Marti Guest

    On Apr 4, 4:10 pm, "bakern" <> wrote:

    > Parents elect to report dependant (12 years old) income on their tax return.
    > The dependant receives SSI due to parent's disability (also collecting SSI).


    As Art already pointed out, SSI isn't taxable and never goes on
    anybody's return. Since the parents are evidently required to file, I
    suspect that we're talking about Social Security Disability Income
    (SSDI), which may be taxable.

    If the child is receiving SSDI the parents cannot include the child's
    income on their return. The child must file a return, including the
    child's SSDI, if the child is required to file. See the filing
    requirements for dependents in the 1040 instructions.

    Phil Marti
    VITA/TCE Volunteer

    --
    << ------------------------------------------------------- >>
    << The foregoing was not intended or written to be used, >>
    << nor can it used, for the purpose of avoiding penalties >>
    << that may be imposed upon the taxpayer. >>
    << >>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting posts >>
    << to this newsgroup as well as our anti-spamming policy >>
    << are at www.asktax.org. >>
    << Copyright (2007) - All rights reserved. >>
    << ------------------------------------------------------- >>
     
    Phil Marti, Apr 5, 2010
    #3
  4. "Phil Marti" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Apr 4, 4:10 pm, "bakern" <> wrote:
    >
    >> Parents elect to report dependant (12 years old) income on their tax
    >> return.
    >> The dependant receives SSI due to parent's disability (also collecting
    >> SSI).

    >
    > As Art already pointed out, SSI isn't taxable and never goes on
    > anybody's return. Since the parents are evidently required to file, I
    > suspect that we're talking about Social Security Disability Income
    > (SSDI), which may be taxable.
    >
    > If the child is receiving SSDI the parents cannot include the child's
    > income on their return. The child must file a return, including the
    > child's SSDI, if the child is required to file. See the filing
    > requirements for dependents in the 1040 instructions.
    >
    > Phil Marti
    > VITA/TCE Volunteer


    My esteemed colleagues, Art & Phil, have it almost right.

    SSI IS Social Security Income. As such it would get reported on the
    recipient's tax returns NOT the parent's returns. Like ALL OTHER SSA income
    it is only taxable when OTHER income exceeds a certain dollar amount,
    otherwise it is NOT taxable and a return is NOT otherwise required. So
    you'd only have to report this IF the child had other income and had to file
    a return on their own.

    If all the other income for the child is investment income and the other
    rules apply, the parents can elect to report the child's investment income
    on their return. BUT please note - parent's can only elect to report a
    child's INVESTMENT income on their return - NOTHING ELSE.

    If junior has a paper-route or babysits or works a summer job OR HAS
    INVESTMENT SALES reported in their name and SSN they have to file their OWN
    return.

    Good luck,
    Gene E. Utterback, EA, RFC, ABA

    --
    << ------------------------------------------------------- >>
    << The foregoing was not intended or written to be used, >>
    << nor can it used, for the purpose of avoiding penalties >>
    << that may be imposed upon the taxpayer. >>
    << >>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting posts >>
    << to this newsgroup as well as our anti-spamming policy >>
    << are at www.asktax.org. >>
    << Copyright (2007) - All rights reserved. >>
    << ------------------------------------------------------- >>
     
    Gene E. Utterback, EA, RFC, ABA, Apr 5, 2010
    #4
  5. bakern

    Phil Marti Guest

    On Apr 5, 11:34 am, "Gene E. Utterback, EA, RFC, ABA" wrote:

    > My esteemed colleagues, Art & Phil, have it almost right.
    >
    > SSI IS Social Security Income.  As such it would get reported on the
    > recipient's tax returns NOT the parent's returns.  Like ALL OTHER SSA income
    > it is only taxable when OTHER income exceeds a certain dollar amount,
    > otherwise it is NOT taxable and a return is NOT otherwise required.  


    Au contraire, as we say in Kansas.

    See page 35 of Pub 525, which specifically excludes SSI from
    potentially taxable Social Security benefits. Realizing that IRS pubs
    aren't law, let's look at the law. IRC 86 defines Social Security
    Benefits as benefits arising under title II of the Social Security
    Act. In IRC 51 we have a reference to SSI, which is paid under title
    XVI of the Social Security Act.

    'Nuff for me to conclude that Pub 525 is right, and SSI is never
    included in taxable income or reported on a return.

    Phil Marti
    VITA/TCE Volunteer

    --
    << ------------------------------------------------------- >>
    << The foregoing was not intended or written to be used, >>
    << nor can it used, for the purpose of avoiding penalties >>
    << that may be imposed upon the taxpayer. >>
    << >>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting posts >>
    << to this newsgroup as well as our anti-spamming policy >>
    << are at www.asktax.org. >>
    << Copyright (2007) - All rights reserved. >>
    << ------------------------------------------------------- >>
     
    Phil Marti, Apr 5, 2010
    #5
  6. bakern

    Alan Guest

    On 4/5/10 12:06 PM, Phil Marti wrote:
    > On Apr 5, 11:34 am, "Gene E. Utterback, EA, RFC, ABA" wrote:
    >
    >> My esteemed colleagues, Art& Phil, have it almost right.
    >>
    >> SSI IS Social Security Income. As such it would get reported on the
    >> recipient's tax returns NOT the parent's returns. Like ALL OTHER SSA income
    >> it is only taxable when OTHER income exceeds a certain dollar amount,
    >> otherwise it is NOT taxable and a return is NOT otherwise required.

    >
    > Au contraire, as we say in Kansas.
    >
    > See page 35 of Pub 525, which specifically excludes SSI from
    > potentially taxable Social Security benefits. Realizing that IRS pubs
    > aren't law, let's look at the law. IRC 86 defines Social Security
    > Benefits as benefits arising under title II of the Social Security
    > Act. In IRC 51 we have a reference to SSI, which is paid under title
    > XVI of the Social Security Act.
    >
    > 'Nuff for me to conclude that Pub 525 is right, and SSI is never
    > included in taxable income or reported on a return.
    >
    > Phil Marti
    > VITA/TCE Volunteer
    >

    Hang in there Phil, you got it right.

    Also note that many of the clients I see use the term SSI when
    they really mean to say SSDI or social security disability. I now
    ask anyone who says SSI, what they really mean. SSI is not
    reported on the SSA-1099. Another bit of proof that it is not
    social security benefits.

    --
    http://taxtopics.net

    --
    << ------------------------------------------------------- >>
    << The foregoing was not intended or written to be used, >>
    << nor can it used, for the purpose of avoiding penalties >>
    << that may be imposed upon the taxpayer. >>
    << >>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting posts >>
    << to this newsgroup as well as our anti-spamming policy >>
    << are at www.asktax.org. >>
    << Copyright (2007) - All rights reserved. >>
    << ------------------------------------------------------- >>
     
    Alan, Apr 6, 2010
    #6
  7. In article <hpcvua$l96$-september.org>,
    Gene E. Utterback, EA, RFC, ABA <> wrote:
    >"Phil Marti" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Apr 4, 4:10 pm, "bakern" <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Parents elect to report dependant (12 years old) income on their tax
    >>> return.
    >>> The dependant receives SSI due to parent's disability (also collecting
    >>> SSI).

    >>
    >> As Art already pointed out, SSI isn't taxable and never goes on
    >> anybody's return. Since the parents are evidently required to file, I
    >> suspect that we're talking about Social Security Disability Income
    >> (SSDI), which may be taxable.
    >>
    >> If the child is receiving SSDI the parents cannot include the child's
    >> income on their return. The child must file a return, including the
    >> child's SSDI, if the child is required to file. See the filing
    >> requirements for dependents in the 1040 instructions.
    >>
    >> Phil Marti
    >> VITA/TCE Volunteer

    >
    >My esteemed colleagues, Art & Phil, have it almost right.
    >
    >SSI IS Social Security Income. As such it would get reported on the



    Ah, I see where you were misled. SSI is Supplemental Security Income.
    That's never taxable.
    --

    ArtKamlet at a o l dot c o m Columbus OH K2PZH

    --
    << ------------------------------------------------------- >>
    << The foregoing was not intended or written to be used, >>
    << nor can it used, for the purpose of avoiding penalties >>
    << that may be imposed upon the taxpayer. >>
    << >>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting posts >>
    << to this newsgroup as well as our anti-spamming policy >>
    << are at www.asktax.org. >>
    << Copyright (2007) - All rights reserved. >>
    << ------------------------------------------------------- >>
     
    Arthur Kamlet, Apr 6, 2010
    #7
  8. "Phil Marti" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Apr 5, 11:34 am, "Gene E. Utterback, EA, RFC, ABA" wrote:
    >
    >> My esteemed colleagues, Art & Phil, have it almost right.
    >>
    >> SSI IS Social Security Income. As such it would get reported on the
    >> recipient's tax returns NOT the parent's returns. Like ALL OTHER SSA
    >> income
    >> it is only taxable when OTHER income exceeds a certain dollar amount,
    >> otherwise it is NOT taxable and a return is NOT otherwise required.

    >
    > Au contraire, as we say in Kansas.
    >
    > See page 35 of Pub 525, which specifically excludes SSI from
    > potentially taxable Social Security benefits. Realizing that IRS pubs
    > aren't law, let's look at the law. IRC 86 defines Social Security
    > Benefits as benefits arising under title II of the Social Security
    > Act. In IRC 51 we have a reference to SSI, which is paid under title
    > XVI of the Social Security Act.
    >
    > 'Nuff for me to conclude that Pub 525 is right, and SSI is never
    > included in taxable income or reported on a return.
    >
    > Phil Marti
    > VITA/TCE Volunteer


    I have been DUPED, TRICKED, I say - flim flammed!! This is outrageous,
    unconscionable and other big words that elude me at the moment. That's what
    I get for responding off the cuff while making assumptions and
    "half-reading" the OP.

    I do believe that I may stand corrected (hard to argue with a cite) - my
    apologies,
    Gene E. Utterback, EA, RFC, ABA

    --
    << ------------------------------------------------------- >>
    << The foregoing was not intended or written to be used, >>
    << nor can it used, for the purpose of avoiding penalties >>
    << that may be imposed upon the taxpayer. >>
    << >>
    << The Charter and the Guidelines for submitting posts >>
    << to this newsgroup as well as our anti-spamming policy >>
    << are at www.asktax.org. >>
    << Copyright (2007) - All rights reserved. >>
    << ------------------------------------------------------- >>
     
    Gene E. Utterback, EA, RFC, ABA, Apr 6, 2010
    #8
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