SSP after 28 weeks

Discussion in 'UK Tax Credits and Benefits' started by RichardL, Jan 10, 2010.

  1. RichardL

    RichardL Guest

    Hi,
    my wife works for the NHS and has gone onto half pay as well as 28
    weeks SSP running out that was paid by her employer.
    Can she get SSP from the state as well as her half pay? How long do
    you get it for?
    thanks,
    Richard
     
    RichardL, Jan 10, 2010
    #1
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  2. RichardL

    Robbie Guest

    RichardL wrote:
    > Hi,
    > my wife works for the NHS and has gone onto half pay as well as 28
    > weeks SSP running out that was paid by her employer.
    > Can she get SSP from the state as well as her half pay? How long do
    > you get it for?
    > thanks,
    > Richard


    SSP is only payable for a maximum of 28 weeks. She will need to claim
    Employment And Support Allowance and should have been given the form to
    do so by her employer.
     
    Robbie, Jan 11, 2010
    #2
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  3. RichardL

    RichardL Guest

    On Jan 11, 11:44 am, Robbie <> wrote:
    > RichardL wrote:
    > > Hi,
    > > my wife works for the NHS and has gone onto half pay as well as 28
    > > weeks SSP running out that was paid by her employer.
    > > Can she get SSP from the state as well as her half pay? How long do
    > > you get it for?
    > > thanks,
    > > Richard

    >
    > SSP is only payable for a maximum of 28 weeks. She will need to claim
    > Employment And Support Allowance and should have been given the form to
    > do so by her employer.


    Thanks for your reply, I guess what I'm asking is - irrespective of
    income (half pay) will she actually still get something from the
    state? Never having claimed a penny before, I have always been under
    the impression that you only get money from the state if you don't
    have any (or not a lot) of income.
    regards,
    Richard
     
    RichardL, Jan 11, 2010
    #3
  4. RichardL

    Robbie Guest

    On 11/01/2010 12:43, RichardL wrote:
    > On Jan 11, 11:44 am, Robbie<> wrote:
    >> RichardL wrote:
    >>> Hi,
    >>> my wife works for the NHS and has gone onto half pay as well as 28
    >>> weeks SSP running out that was paid by her employer.
    >>> Can she get SSP from the state as well as her half pay? How long do
    >>> you get it for?
    >>> thanks,
    >>> Richard

    >>
    >> SSP is only payable for a maximum of 28 weeks. She will need to claim
    >> Employment And Support Allowance and should have been given the form to
    >> do so by her employer.

    >
    > Thanks for your reply, I guess what I'm asking is - irrespective of
    > income (half pay) will she actually still get something from the
    > state? Never having claimed a penny before, I have always been under
    > the impression that you only get money from the state if you don't
    > have any (or not a lot) of income.
    > regards,
    > Richard


    If she has paid the correct National Insurance contributions at the
    right time then she should get contributory ESA. Otherwise the only help
    available is the income based ESA which is means tested and includes
    yourself in the means test.

    If she claims ESA (of either type) then she will have to attend a
    medical (Work Capability Assessment) within 13 weeks of starting her
    claim. If she fails this test then she won't be entitled to any further
    ESA unless she appeals against the decision.

    If you are on a very low income, are aged 25 or over and work 30 hours a
    week you might want to consider claiming tax credits. In addition you
    could consider claiming Housing Benefit, if you rent a place and council
    tax benefit. If you are on a decent income then you'll mist likely not
    qualify for any of these benefits and credits.
     
    Robbie, Jan 11, 2010
    #4
  5. RichardL

    RichardL Guest

    On 11 Jan, 14:24, Robbie <> wrote:
    > On 11/01/2010 12:43, RichardL wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Jan 11, 11:44 am, Robbie<>  wrote:
    > >> RichardL wrote:
    > >>> Hi,
    > >>> my wife works for the NHS and has gone onto half pay as well as 28
    > >>> weeks SSP running out that was paid by her employer.
    > >>> Can she get SSP from the state as well as her half pay? How long do
    > >>> you get it for?
    > >>> thanks,
    > >>> Richard

    >
    > >> SSP is only payable for a maximum of 28 weeks. She will need to claim
    > >> Employment And Support Allowance and should have been given the form to
    > >> do so by her employer.

    >
    > > Thanks for your reply, I guess what I'm asking is - irrespective of
    > > income (half pay) will she actually still get something from the
    > > state? Never having claimed a penny before, I have always been under
    > > the impression that you only get money from the state if you don't
    > > have any (or not a lot) of income.
    > > regards,
    > > Richard

    >
    > If she has paid the correct National Insurance contributions at the
    > right time then she should get contributory ESA. Otherwise the only help
    > available is the income based ESA which is means tested and includes
    > yourself in the means test.
    >
    > If she claims ESA (of either type) then she will have to attend a
    > medical (Work Capability Assessment) within 13 weeks of starting her
    > claim. If she fails this test then she won't be entitled to any further
    > ESA unless she appeals against the decision.
    >
    > If you are on a very low income, are aged 25 or over and work 30 hours a
    > week you might want to consider claiming tax credits. In addition you
    > could consider claiming Housing Benefit, if you rent a place and council
    > tax benefit. If you are on a decent income then you'll mist likely not
    > qualify for any of these benefits and credits.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Thanks for this - looks like she can get ESA then. She is not
    unemployed - she is just on half pay.
    Does she still have to have a medical as she sees the NHS occupational
    Health every few weeks?
    thanks,
    Richard
     
    RichardL, Jan 11, 2010
    #5
  6. RichardL

    Robbie Guest

    On 11/01/2010 21:04, RichardL wrote:
    > On 11 Jan, 14:24, Robbie<> wrote:
    >> On 11/01/2010 12:43, RichardL wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> On Jan 11, 11:44 am, Robbie<> wrote:
    >>>> RichardL wrote:
    >>>>> Hi,
    >>>>> my wife works for the NHS and has gone onto half pay as well as 28
    >>>>> weeks SSP running out that was paid by her employer.
    >>>>> Can she get SSP from the state as well as her half pay? How long do
    >>>>> you get it for?
    >>>>> thanks,
    >>>>> Richard

    >>
    >>>> SSP is only payable for a maximum of 28 weeks. She will need to claim
    >>>> Employment And Support Allowance and should have been given the form to
    >>>> do so by her employer.

    >>
    >>> Thanks for your reply, I guess what I'm asking is - irrespective of
    >>> income (half pay) will she actually still get something from the
    >>> state? Never having claimed a penny before, I have always been under
    >>> the impression that you only get money from the state if you don't
    >>> have any (or not a lot) of income.
    >>> regards,
    >>> Richard

    >>
    >> If she has paid the correct National Insurance contributions at the
    >> right time then she should get contributory ESA. Otherwise the only help
    >> available is the income based ESA which is means tested and includes
    >> yourself in the means test.
    >>
    >> If she claims ESA (of either type) then she will have to attend a
    >> medical (Work Capability Assessment) within 13 weeks of starting her
    >> claim. If she fails this test then she won't be entitled to any further
    >> ESA unless she appeals against the decision.
    >>
    >> If you are on a very low income, are aged 25 or over and work 30 hours a
    >> week you might want to consider claiming tax credits. In addition you
    >> could consider claiming Housing Benefit, if you rent a place and council
    >> tax benefit. If you are on a decent income then you'll mist likely not
    >> qualify for any of these benefits and credits.- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > Thanks for this - looks like she can get ESA then. She is not
    > unemployed - she is just on half pay.
    > Does she still have to have a medical as she sees the NHS occupational
    > Health every few weeks?
    > thanks,
    > Richard


    Unless she falls into a group of people who are exempt - and the range
    of exemptions is very limited then yes, she would need to have the Work
    Capability Assessment regardless of the fact that she is still employed,
    albeit currently not able to work.
     
    Robbie, Jan 11, 2010
    #6
  7. RichardL

    Robbie Guest

    Robbie wrote:
    > On 11/01/2010 21:04, RichardL wrote:
    >> On 11 Jan, 14:24, Robbie<> wrote:
    >>> On 11/01/2010 12:43, RichardL wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> On Jan 11, 11:44 am, Robbie<> wrote:
    >>>>> RichardL wrote:
    >>>>>> Hi,
    >>>>>> my wife works for the NHS and has gone onto half pay as well as 28
    >>>>>> weeks SSP running out that was paid by her employer.
    >>>>>> Can she get SSP from the state as well as her half pay? How long do
    >>>>>> you get it for?
    >>>>>> thanks,
    >>>>>> Richard
    >>>
    >>>>> SSP is only payable for a maximum of 28 weeks. She will need to claim
    >>>>> Employment And Support Allowance and should have been given the
    >>>>> form to
    >>>>> do so by her employer.
    >>>
    >>>> Thanks for your reply, I guess what I'm asking is - irrespective of
    >>>> income (half pay) will she actually still get something from the
    >>>> state? Never having claimed a penny before, I have always been under
    >>>> the impression that you only get money from the state if you don't
    >>>> have any (or not a lot) of income.
    >>>> regards,
    >>>> Richard
    >>>
    >>> If she has paid the correct National Insurance contributions at the
    >>> right time then she should get contributory ESA. Otherwise the only help
    >>> available is the income based ESA which is means tested and includes
    >>> yourself in the means test.
    >>>
    >>> If she claims ESA (of either type) then she will have to attend a
    >>> medical (Work Capability Assessment) within 13 weeks of starting her
    >>> claim. If she fails this test then she won't be entitled to any further
    >>> ESA unless she appeals against the decision.
    >>>
    >>> If you are on a very low income, are aged 25 or over and work 30 hours a
    >>> week you might want to consider claiming tax credits. In addition you
    >>> could consider claiming Housing Benefit, if you rent a place and council
    >>> tax benefit. If you are on a decent income then you'll mist likely not
    >>> qualify for any of these benefits and credits.- Hide quoted text -
    >>>
    >>> - Show quoted text -

    >>
    >> Thanks for this - looks like she can get ESA then. She is not
    >> unemployed - she is just on half pay.
    >> Does she still have to have a medical as she sees the NHS occupational
    >> Health every few weeks?
    >> thanks,
    >> Richard

    >
    > Unless she falls into a group of people who are exempt - and the range
    > of exemptions is very limited then yes, she would need to have the Work
    > Capability Assessment regardless of the fact that she is still employed,
    > albeit currently not able to work.


    I'll slightly amend this - it should read that she "may" as opposed to
    "would" have to have the WCA. At some point in the early days of her ESA
    claim she will be sent a form, an ESA50, which will ask many questions
    about her health. If the Decision Maker can decide on the basis of
    answers given on that form and perhaps any information from a health
    professional then ESA can continue without the need for a WCA (medical).
    If the position is not clear or further clarification is needed then a
    WCA will take place. It seems as if the WCA is pretty much the norm though.
     
    Robbie, Jan 12, 2010
    #7
  8. RichardL

    RichardL Guest

    On 12 Jan, 11:23, Robbie <> wrote:
    > Robbie wrote:
    > > On 11/01/2010 21:04, RichardL wrote:
    > >> On 11 Jan, 14:24, Robbie<>  wrote:
    > >>> On 11/01/2010 12:43, RichardL wrote:

    >
    > >>>> On Jan 11, 11:44 am, Robbie<>    wrote:
    > >>>>> RichardL wrote:
    > >>>>>> Hi,
    > >>>>>> my wife works for the NHS and has gone onto half pay as well as 28
    > >>>>>> weeks SSP running out that was paid by her employer.
    > >>>>>> Can she get SSP from the state as well as her half pay? How long do
    > >>>>>> you get it for?
    > >>>>>> thanks,
    > >>>>>> Richard

    >
    > >>>>> SSP is only payable for a maximum of 28 weeks. She will need to claim
    > >>>>> Employment And Support Allowance and should have been given the
    > >>>>> form to
    > >>>>> do so by her employer.

    >
    > >>>> Thanks for your reply, I guess what I'm asking is - irrespective of
    > >>>> income (half pay) will she actually still get something from the
    > >>>> state? Never having claimed a penny before, I have always been under
    > >>>> the impression that you only get money from the state if you don't
    > >>>> have any (or not a lot) of income.
    > >>>> regards,
    > >>>> Richard

    >
    > >>> If she has paid the correct National Insurance contributions at the
    > >>> right time then she should get contributory ESA. Otherwise the only help
    > >>> available is the income based ESA which is means tested and includes
    > >>> yourself in the means test.

    >
    > >>> If she claims ESA (of either type) then she will have to attend a
    > >>> medical (Work Capability Assessment) within 13 weeks of starting her
    > >>> claim. If she fails this test then she won't be entitled to any further
    > >>> ESA unless she appeals against the decision.

    >
    > >>> If you are on a very low income, are aged 25 or over and work 30 hours a
    > >>> week you might want to consider claiming tax credits. In addition you
    > >>> could consider claiming Housing Benefit, if you rent a place and council
    > >>> tax benefit. If you are on a decent income then you'll mist likely not
    > >>> qualify for any of these benefits and credits.- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >>> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > >> Thanks for this - looks like she can get ESA then. She is not
    > >> unemployed - she is just on half pay.
    > >> Does she still have to have a medical as she sees the NHS occupational
    > >> Health every few weeks?
    > >> thanks,
    > >> Richard

    >
    > > Unless she falls into a group of people who are exempt - and the range
    > > of exemptions is very limited then yes, she would need to have the Work
    > > Capability Assessment regardless of the fact that she is still employed,
    > > albeit currently not able to work.

    >
    > I'll slightly amend this - it should read that she "may" as opposed to
    > "would" have to have the WCA. At some point in the early days of her ESA
    > claim she will be sent a form, an ESA50, which will ask many questions
    > about her health. If the Decision Maker can decide on the basis of
    > answers given on that form and perhaps any information from a health
    > professional then ESA can continue without the need for a WCA (medical).
    > If the position is not clear or further clarification is needed then a
    > WCA will take place. It seems as if the WCA is pretty much the norm though.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Looks like they are not sure now! We can't get a straight answer on
    this for some reason. Do you think she is the first person to go on
    half pay? What is complicated? Surely they should know if she is
    eligble or not.
    R
     
    RichardL, Jan 16, 2010
    #8
  9. RichardL

    Robbie Guest

    On 16/01/2010 00:56, RichardL wrote:
    > On 12 Jan, 11:23, Robbie<> wrote:
    >> Robbie wrote:
    >>> On 11/01/2010 21:04, RichardL wrote:
    >>>> On 11 Jan, 14:24, Robbie<> wrote:
    >>>>> On 11/01/2010 12:43, RichardL wrote:

    >>
    >>>>>> On Jan 11, 11:44 am, Robbie<> wrote:
    >>>>>>> RichardL wrote:
    >>>>>>>> Hi,
    >>>>>>>> my wife works for the NHS and has gone onto half pay as well as 28
    >>>>>>>> weeks SSP running out that was paid by her employer.
    >>>>>>>> Can she get SSP from the state as well as her half pay? How long do
    >>>>>>>> you get it for?
    >>>>>>>> thanks,
    >>>>>>>> Richard

    >>
    >>>>>>> SSP is only payable for a maximum of 28 weeks. She will need to claim
    >>>>>>> Employment And Support Allowance and should have been given the
    >>>>>>> form to
    >>>>>>> do so by her employer.

    >>
    >>>>>> Thanks for your reply, I guess what I'm asking is - irrespective of
    >>>>>> income (half pay) will she actually still get something from the
    >>>>>> state? Never having claimed a penny before, I have always been under
    >>>>>> the impression that you only get money from the state if you don't
    >>>>>> have any (or not a lot) of income.
    >>>>>> regards,
    >>>>>> Richard

    >>
    >>>>> If she has paid the correct National Insurance contributions at the
    >>>>> right time then she should get contributory ESA. Otherwise the only help
    >>>>> available is the income based ESA which is means tested and includes
    >>>>> yourself in the means test.

    >>
    >>>>> If she claims ESA (of either type) then she will have to attend a
    >>>>> medical (Work Capability Assessment) within 13 weeks of starting her
    >>>>> claim. If she fails this test then she won't be entitled to any further
    >>>>> ESA unless she appeals against the decision.

    >>
    >>>>> If you are on a very low income, are aged 25 or over and work 30 hours a
    >>>>> week you might want to consider claiming tax credits. In addition you
    >>>>> could consider claiming Housing Benefit, if you rent a place and council
    >>>>> tax benefit. If you are on a decent income then you'll mist likely not
    >>>>> qualify for any of these benefits and credits.- Hide quoted text -

    >>
    >>>>> - Show quoted text -

    >>
    >>>> Thanks for this - looks like she can get ESA then. She is not
    >>>> unemployed - she is just on half pay.
    >>>> Does she still have to have a medical as she sees the NHS occupational
    >>>> Health every few weeks?
    >>>> thanks,
    >>>> Richard

    >>
    >>> Unless she falls into a group of people who are exempt - and the range
    >>> of exemptions is very limited then yes, she would need to have the Work
    >>> Capability Assessment regardless of the fact that she is still employed,
    >>> albeit currently not able to work.

    >>
    >> I'll slightly amend this - it should read that she "may" as opposed to
    >> "would" have to have the WCA. At some point in the early days of her ESA
    >> claim she will be sent a form, an ESA50, which will ask many questions
    >> about her health. If the Decision Maker can decide on the basis of
    >> answers given on that form and perhaps any information from a health
    >> professional then ESA can continue without the need for a WCA (medical).
    >> If the position is not clear or further clarification is needed then a
    >> WCA will take place. It seems as if the WCA is pretty much the norm though.- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > Looks like they are not sure now! We can't get a straight answer on
    > this for some reason. Do you think she is the first person to go on
    > half pay? What is complicated? Surely they should know if she is
    > eligble or not.
    > R


    Sorry, I don't follow, who are "they"? And what question were you
    asking? If you mean is she entitled to ESA, she needs to claim it first
    as it is based on her NI contributions and they need to be checked
    before a decision can be made. The income based (means tested) ESA claim
    also has to be made before a decision can be made on eligibility as your
    circumstances, income etc have to be included in any means test. It
    isn't as straightforward as just making a quick, educated guess due to
    the different factors that need to be looked at.

    The half pay is only an issue if it is income based ESA she is claiming,
    it doesn't affect the contributions based ESA.
     
    Robbie, Jan 16, 2010
    #9
  10. RichardL

    RichardL Guest

    On 16 Jan, 02:46, Robbie <> wrote:
    > On 16/01/2010 00:56, RichardL wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On 12 Jan, 11:23, Robbie<>  wrote:
    > >> Robbie wrote:
    > >>> On 11/01/2010 21:04, RichardL wrote:
    > >>>> On 11 Jan, 14:24, Robbie<>    wrote:
    > >>>>> On 11/01/2010 12:43, RichardL wrote:

    >
    > >>>>>> On Jan 11, 11:44 am, Robbie<>      wrote:
    > >>>>>>> RichardL wrote:
    > >>>>>>>> Hi,
    > >>>>>>>> my wife works for the NHS and has gone onto half pay as well as 28
    > >>>>>>>> weeks SSP running out that was paid by her employer.
    > >>>>>>>> Can she get SSP from the state as well as her half pay? How longdo
    > >>>>>>>> you get it for?
    > >>>>>>>> thanks,
    > >>>>>>>> Richard

    >
    > >>>>>>> SSP is only payable for a maximum of 28 weeks. She will need to claim
    > >>>>>>> Employment And Support Allowance and should have been given the
    > >>>>>>> form to
    > >>>>>>> do so by her employer.

    >
    > >>>>>> Thanks for your reply, I guess what I'm asking is - irrespective of
    > >>>>>> income (half pay) will she actually still get something from the
    > >>>>>> state? Never having claimed a penny before, I have always been under
    > >>>>>> the impression that you only get money from the state if you don't
    > >>>>>> have any (or not a lot) of income.
    > >>>>>> regards,
    > >>>>>> Richard

    >
    > >>>>> If she has paid the correct National Insurance contributions at the
    > >>>>> right time then she should get contributory ESA. Otherwise the onlyhelp
    > >>>>> available is the income based ESA which is means tested and includes
    > >>>>> yourself in the means test.

    >
    > >>>>> If she claims ESA (of either type) then she will have to attend a
    > >>>>> medical (Work Capability Assessment) within 13 weeks of starting her
    > >>>>> claim. If she fails this test then she won't be entitled to any further
    > >>>>> ESA unless she appeals against the decision.

    >
    > >>>>> If you are on a very low income, are aged 25 or over and work 30 hours a
    > >>>>> week you might want to consider claiming tax credits. In addition you
    > >>>>> could consider claiming Housing Benefit, if you rent a place and council
    > >>>>> tax benefit. If you are on a decent income then you'll mist likely not
    > >>>>> qualify for any of these benefits and credits.- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >>>>> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > >>>> Thanks for this - looks like she can get ESA then. She is not
    > >>>> unemployed - she is just on half pay.
    > >>>> Does she still have to have a medical as she sees the NHS occupational
    > >>>> Health every few weeks?
    > >>>> thanks,
    > >>>> Richard

    >
    > >>> Unless she falls into a group of people who are exempt - and the range
    > >>> of exemptions is very limited then yes, she would need to have the Work
    > >>> Capability Assessment regardless of the fact that she is still employed,
    > >>> albeit currently not able to work.

    >
    > >> I'll slightly amend this - it should read that she "may" as opposed to
    > >> "would" have to have the WCA. At some point in the early days of her ESA
    > >> claim she will be sent a form, an ESA50, which will ask many questions
    > >> about her health. If the Decision Maker can decide on the basis of
    > >> answers given on that form and perhaps any information from a health
    > >> professional then ESA can continue without the need for a WCA (medical).
    > >> If the position is not clear or further clarification is needed then a
    > >> WCA will take place. It seems as if the WCA is pretty much the norm though.- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > > Looks like they are not sure now! We can't get a straight answer on
    > > this for some reason. Do you think she is the first person to go on
    > > half pay? What is complicated? Surely they should know if she is
    > > eligble or not.
    > > R

    >
    > Sorry, I don't follow, who are "they"? And what question were you
    > asking? If you mean is she entitled to ESA, she needs to claim it first
    > as it is based on her NI contributions and they need to be checked
    > before a decision can be made. The income based (means tested) ESA claim
    > also has to be made before a decision can be made on eligibility as your
    > circumstances, income etc have to be included in any means test. It
    > isn't as straightforward as just making a quick, educated guess due to
    > the different factors that need to be looked at.
    >
    > The half pay is only an issue if it is income based ESA she is claiming,
    > it doesn't affect the contributions based ESA.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Thanks for still showing interest. It is contribution based we are
    claiming. I work and she is on half pay so we know if we were means
    tested we wouldn't get anything. They paid the first week £64.30 then
    asked for payslips and doctors notes and it all went quiet. I rang
    yesterday and spoke to a person handling the case who said they
    thought she was not entitled to benefit if she was receiving half pay!
    But they weren't sure. I can't believe they don't know the procedure.
    regards,
    Richard
     
    RichardL, Jan 16, 2010
    #10
  11. RichardL

    Robbie Guest

    RichardL wrote:
    > On 16 Jan, 02:46, Robbie <> wrote:
    >> On 16/01/2010 00:56, RichardL wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> On 12 Jan, 11:23, Robbie<> wrote:
    >>>> Robbie wrote:
    >>>>> On 11/01/2010 21:04, RichardL wrote:
    >>>>>> On 11 Jan, 14:24, Robbie<> wrote:
    >>>>>>> On 11/01/2010 12:43, RichardL wrote:
    >>>>>>>> On Jan 11, 11:44 am, Robbie<> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>> RichardL wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>> Hi,
    >>>>>>>>>> my wife works for the NHS and has gone onto half pay as well as 28
    >>>>>>>>>> weeks SSP running out that was paid by her employer.
    >>>>>>>>>> Can she get SSP from the state as well as her half pay? How long do
    >>>>>>>>>> you get it for?
    >>>>>>>>>> thanks,
    >>>>>>>>>> Richard
    >>>>>>>>> SSP is only payable for a maximum of 28 weeks. She will need to claim
    >>>>>>>>> Employment And Support Allowance and should have been given the
    >>>>>>>>> form to
    >>>>>>>>> do so by her employer.
    >>>>>>>> Thanks for your reply, I guess what I'm asking is - irrespective of
    >>>>>>>> income (half pay) will she actually still get something from the
    >>>>>>>> state? Never having claimed a penny before, I have always been under
    >>>>>>>> the impression that you only get money from the state if you don't
    >>>>>>>> have any (or not a lot) of income.
    >>>>>>>> regards,
    >>>>>>>> Richard
    >>>>>>> If she has paid the correct National Insurance contributions at the
    >>>>>>> right time then she should get contributory ESA. Otherwise the only help
    >>>>>>> available is the income based ESA which is means tested and includes
    >>>>>>> yourself in the means test.
    >>>>>>> If she claims ESA (of either type) then she will have to attend a
    >>>>>>> medical (Work Capability Assessment) within 13 weeks of starting her
    >>>>>>> claim. If she fails this test then she won't be entitled to any further
    >>>>>>> ESA unless she appeals against the decision.
    >>>>>>> If you are on a very low income, are aged 25 or over and work 30 hours a
    >>>>>>> week you might want to consider claiming tax credits. In addition you
    >>>>>>> could consider claiming Housing Benefit, if you rent a place and council
    >>>>>>> tax benefit. If you are on a decent income then you'll mist likely not
    >>>>>>> qualify for any of these benefits and credits.- Hide quoted text -
    >>>>>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>>>>> Thanks for this - looks like she can get ESA then. She is not
    >>>>>> unemployed - she is just on half pay.
    >>>>>> Does she still have to have a medical as she sees the NHS occupational
    >>>>>> Health every few weeks?
    >>>>>> thanks,
    >>>>>> Richard
    >>>>> Unless she falls into a group of people who are exempt - and the range
    >>>>> of exemptions is very limited then yes, she would need to have the Work
    >>>>> Capability Assessment regardless of the fact that she is still employed,
    >>>>> albeit currently not able to work.
    >>>> I'll slightly amend this - it should read that she "may" as opposed to
    >>>> "would" have to have the WCA. At some point in the early days of her ESA
    >>>> claim she will be sent a form, an ESA50, which will ask many questions
    >>>> about her health. If the Decision Maker can decide on the basis of
    >>>> answers given on that form and perhaps any information from a health
    >>>> professional then ESA can continue without the need for a WCA (medical).
    >>>> If the position is not clear or further clarification is needed then a
    >>>> WCA will take place. It seems as if the WCA is pretty much the norm though.- Hide quoted text -
    >>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>> Looks like they are not sure now! We can't get a straight answer on
    >>> this for some reason. Do you think she is the first person to go on
    >>> half pay? What is complicated? Surely they should know if she is
    >>> eligble or not.
    >>> R

    >> Sorry, I don't follow, who are "they"? And what question were you
    >> asking? If you mean is she entitled to ESA, she needs to claim it first
    >> as it is based on her NI contributions and they need to be checked
    >> before a decision can be made. The income based (means tested) ESA claim
    >> also has to be made before a decision can be made on eligibility as your
    >> circumstances, income etc have to be included in any means test. It
    >> isn't as straightforward as just making a quick, educated guess due to
    >> the different factors that need to be looked at.
    >>
    >> The half pay is only an issue if it is income based ESA she is claiming,
    >> it doesn't affect the contributions based ESA.- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > Thanks for still showing interest. It is contribution based we are
    > claiming. I work and she is on half pay so we know if we were means
    > tested we wouldn't get anything. They paid the first week £64.30 then
    > asked for payslips and doctors notes and it all went quiet. I rang
    > yesterday and spoke to a person handling the case who said they
    > thought she was not entitled to benefit if she was receiving half pay!
    > But they weren't sure. I can't believe they don't know the procedure.
    > regards,
    > Richard


    It doesn't matter if she's receiving half pay, full pay or no pay at
    all! Sounds like the DWP clerk doesn't know the rules here.
    Unfortunately some of the staff receive poor training and aren't always
    up with the rules.

    For conts based ESA I'm not even sure if a payslip is required though I
    would send one in if that is what was requested. I certainly can't think
    of a reason for them needing one, unless they are also assessing the
    means tested element as well. A Doctor's note is required but the GP
    does not have to issue a duplicate (the employer should have one
    already). In fact I believe a GP is not meant to issue a duplicate
    except in exceptional circumstances. There are procedures that exist for
    an employee who is also claiming ESA. I believe the employer is meant to
    liaise with the DWP re: the sick note. I can't remember the exact
    procedure though.
     
    Robbie, Jan 16, 2010
    #11
  12. RichardL

    Niteawk Guest

    "Robbie" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > RichardL wrote:
    >> On 16 Jan, 02:46, Robbie <> wrote:
    >>> On 16/01/2010 00:56, RichardL wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> On 12 Jan, 11:23, Robbie<> wrote:
    >>>>> Robbie wrote:
    >>>>>> On 11/01/2010 21:04, RichardL wrote:
    >>>>>>> On 11 Jan, 14:24, Robbie<> wrote:
    >>>>>>>> On 11/01/2010 12:43, RichardL wrote:
    >>>>>>>>> On Jan 11, 11:44 am, Robbie<>
    >>>>>>>>> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>> RichardL wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>>> Hi,
    >>>>>>>>>>> my wife works for the NHS and has gone onto half pay as well as
    >>>>>>>>>>> 28
    >>>>>>>>>>> weeks SSP running out that was paid by her employer.
    >>>>>>>>>>> Can she get SSP from the state as well as her half pay? How long
    >>>>>>>>>>> do
    >>>>>>>>>>> you get it for?
    >>>>>>>>>>> thanks,
    >>>>>>>>>>> Richard
    >>>>>>>>>> SSP is only payable for a maximum of 28 weeks. She will need to
    >>>>>>>>>> claim
    >>>>>>>>>> Employment And Support Allowance and should have been given the
    >>>>>>>>>> form to
    >>>>>>>>>> do so by her employer.
    >>>>>>>>> Thanks for your reply, I guess what I'm asking is - irrespective
    >>>>>>>>> of
    >>>>>>>>> income (half pay) will she actually still get something from the
    >>>>>>>>> state? Never having claimed a penny before, I have always been
    >>>>>>>>> under
    >>>>>>>>> the impression that you only get money from the state if you don't
    >>>>>>>>> have any (or not a lot) of income.
    >>>>>>>>> regards,
    >>>>>>>>> Richard
    >>>>>>>> If she has paid the correct National Insurance contributions at the
    >>>>>>>> right time then she should get contributory ESA. Otherwise the only
    >>>>>>>> help
    >>>>>>>> available is the income based ESA which is means tested and
    >>>>>>>> includes
    >>>>>>>> yourself in the means test.
    >>>>>>>> If she claims ESA (of either type) then she will have to attend a
    >>>>>>>> medical (Work Capability Assessment) within 13 weeks of starting
    >>>>>>>> her
    >>>>>>>> claim. If she fails this test then she won't be entitled to any
    >>>>>>>> further
    >>>>>>>> ESA unless she appeals against the decision.
    >>>>>>>> If you are on a very low income, are aged 25 or over and work 30
    >>>>>>>> hours a
    >>>>>>>> week you might want to consider claiming tax credits. In addition
    >>>>>>>> you
    >>>>>>>> could consider claiming Housing Benefit, if you rent a place and
    >>>>>>>> council
    >>>>>>>> tax benefit. If you are on a decent income then you'll mist likely
    >>>>>>>> not
    >>>>>>>> qualify for any of these benefits and credits.- Hide quoted text -
    >>>>>>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>>>>>> Thanks for this - looks like she can get ESA then. She is not
    >>>>>>> unemployed - she is just on half pay.
    >>>>>>> Does she still have to have a medical as she sees the NHS
    >>>>>>> occupational
    >>>>>>> Health every few weeks?
    >>>>>>> thanks,
    >>>>>>> Richard
    >>>>>> Unless she falls into a group of people who are exempt - and the
    >>>>>> range
    >>>>>> of exemptions is very limited then yes, she would need to have the
    >>>>>> Work
    >>>>>> Capability Assessment regardless of the fact that she is still
    >>>>>> employed,
    >>>>>> albeit currently not able to work.
    >>>>> I'll slightly amend this - it should read that she "may" as opposed to
    >>>>> "would" have to have the WCA. At some point in the early days of her
    >>>>> ESA
    >>>>> claim she will be sent a form, an ESA50, which will ask many questions
    >>>>> about her health. If the Decision Maker can decide on the basis of
    >>>>> answers given on that form and perhaps any information from a health
    >>>>> professional then ESA can continue without the need for a WCA
    >>>>> (medical).
    >>>>> If the position is not clear or further clarification is needed then a
    >>>>> WCA will take place. It seems as if the WCA is pretty much the norm
    >>>>> though.- Hide quoted text -
    >>>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>>> Looks like they are not sure now! We can't get a straight answer on
    >>>> this for some reason. Do you think she is the first person to go on
    >>>> half pay? What is complicated? Surely they should know if she is
    >>>> eligble or not.
    >>>> R
    >>> Sorry, I don't follow, who are "they"? And what question were you
    >>> asking? If you mean is she entitled to ESA, she needs to claim it first
    >>> as it is based on her NI contributions and they need to be checked
    >>> before a decision can be made. The income based (means tested) ESA claim
    >>> also has to be made before a decision can be made on eligibility as your
    >>> circumstances, income etc have to be included in any means test. It
    >>> isn't as straightforward as just making a quick, educated guess due to
    >>> the different factors that need to be looked at.
    >>>
    >>> The half pay is only an issue if it is income based ESA she is claiming,
    >>> it doesn't affect the contributions based ESA.- Hide quoted text -
    >>>
    >>> - Show quoted text -

    >>
    >> Thanks for still showing interest. It is contribution based we are
    >> claiming. I work and she is on half pay so we know if we were means
    >> tested we wouldn't get anything. They paid the first week £64.30 then
    >> asked for payslips and doctors notes and it all went quiet. I rang
    >> yesterday and spoke to a person handling the case who said they
    >> thought she was not entitled to benefit if she was receiving half pay!
    >> But they weren't sure. I can't believe they don't know the procedure.
    >> regards,
    >> Richard

    >
    > It doesn't matter if she's receiving half pay, full pay or no pay at all!
    > Sounds like the DWP clerk doesn't know the rules here. Unfortunately some
    > of the staff receive poor training and aren't always up with the rules.



    I think it does matter, how is she going to qualify for ESA on full pay? No
    pay means she automatically qualifies for cont based ESA subject to the
    usual checks. Being on half pay while hubby is on full pay is a bit of a
    puzzler. IMO she wont qualify if she has enough SSP to live on, they may
    take hubbys income into account here. Who knows?

    The DWP should inform the claimant in writing of any decision they take. The
    OP would be better off going to his local CAB for advice on this matter.
    They may take a while to find the answer to this, but they are generally
    very good at finding the relevant rules and regs that apply to each case.
     
    Niteawk, Jan 16, 2010
    #12
  13. RichardL

    Robbie Guest

    Niteawk wrote:
    >
    > "Robbie" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> RichardL wrote:
    >>> On 16 Jan, 02:46, Robbie <> wrote:
    >>>> On 16/01/2010 00:56, RichardL wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> On 12 Jan, 11:23, Robbie<> wrote:
    >>>>>> Robbie wrote:
    >>>>>>> On 11/01/2010 21:04, RichardL wrote:
    >>>>>>>> On 11 Jan, 14:24, Robbie<> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>> On 11/01/2010 12:43, RichardL wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>> On Jan 11, 11:44 am, Robbie<> wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>>> RichardL wrote:
    >>>>>>>>>>>> Hi,
    >>>>>>>>>>>> my wife works for the NHS and has gone onto half pay as well
    >>>>>>>>>>>> as 28
    >>>>>>>>>>>> weeks SSP running out that was paid by her employer.
    >>>>>>>>>>>> Can she get SSP from the state as well as her half pay? How
    >>>>>>>>>>>> long do
    >>>>>>>>>>>> you get it for?
    >>>>>>>>>>>> thanks,
    >>>>>>>>>>>> Richard
    >>>>>>>>>>> SSP is only payable for a maximum of 28 weeks. She will need
    >>>>>>>>>>> to claim
    >>>>>>>>>>> Employment And Support Allowance and should have been given the
    >>>>>>>>>>> form to
    >>>>>>>>>>> do so by her employer.
    >>>>>>>>>> Thanks for your reply, I guess what I'm asking is -
    >>>>>>>>>> irrespective of
    >>>>>>>>>> income (half pay) will she actually still get something from the
    >>>>>>>>>> state? Never having claimed a penny before, I have always been
    >>>>>>>>>> under
    >>>>>>>>>> the impression that you only get money from the state if you
    >>>>>>>>>> don't
    >>>>>>>>>> have any (or not a lot) of income.
    >>>>>>>>>> regards,
    >>>>>>>>>> Richard
    >>>>>>>>> If she has paid the correct National Insurance contributions at
    >>>>>>>>> the
    >>>>>>>>> right time then she should get contributory ESA. Otherwise the
    >>>>>>>>> only help
    >>>>>>>>> available is the income based ESA which is means tested and
    >>>>>>>>> includes
    >>>>>>>>> yourself in the means test.
    >>>>>>>>> If she claims ESA (of either type) then she will have to attend a
    >>>>>>>>> medical (Work Capability Assessment) within 13 weeks of
    >>>>>>>>> starting her
    >>>>>>>>> claim. If she fails this test then she won't be entitled to any
    >>>>>>>>> further
    >>>>>>>>> ESA unless she appeals against the decision.
    >>>>>>>>> If you are on a very low income, are aged 25 or over and work
    >>>>>>>>> 30 hours a
    >>>>>>>>> week you might want to consider claiming tax credits. In
    >>>>>>>>> addition you
    >>>>>>>>> could consider claiming Housing Benefit, if you rent a place
    >>>>>>>>> and council
    >>>>>>>>> tax benefit. If you are on a decent income then you'll mist
    >>>>>>>>> likely not
    >>>>>>>>> qualify for any of these benefits and credits.- Hide quoted text -
    >>>>>>>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>>>>>>> Thanks for this - looks like she can get ESA then. She is not
    >>>>>>>> unemployed - she is just on half pay.
    >>>>>>>> Does she still have to have a medical as she sees the NHS
    >>>>>>>> occupational
    >>>>>>>> Health every few weeks?
    >>>>>>>> thanks,
    >>>>>>>> Richard
    >>>>>>> Unless she falls into a group of people who are exempt - and the
    >>>>>>> range
    >>>>>>> of exemptions is very limited then yes, she would need to have
    >>>>>>> the Work
    >>>>>>> Capability Assessment regardless of the fact that she is still
    >>>>>>> employed,
    >>>>>>> albeit currently not able to work.
    >>>>>> I'll slightly amend this - it should read that she "may" as
    >>>>>> opposed to
    >>>>>> "would" have to have the WCA. At some point in the early days of
    >>>>>> her ESA
    >>>>>> claim she will be sent a form, an ESA50, which will ask many
    >>>>>> questions
    >>>>>> about her health. If the Decision Maker can decide on the basis of
    >>>>>> answers given on that form and perhaps any information from a health
    >>>>>> professional then ESA can continue without the need for a WCA
    >>>>>> (medical).
    >>>>>> If the position is not clear or further clarification is needed
    >>>>>> then a
    >>>>>> WCA will take place. It seems as if the WCA is pretty much the
    >>>>>> norm though.- Hide quoted text -
    >>>>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>>>> Looks like they are not sure now! We can't get a straight answer on
    >>>>> this for some reason. Do you think she is the first person to go on
    >>>>> half pay? What is complicated? Surely they should know if she is
    >>>>> eligble or not.
    >>>>> R
    >>>> Sorry, I don't follow, who are "they"? And what question were you
    >>>> asking? If you mean is she entitled to ESA, she needs to claim it first
    >>>> as it is based on her NI contributions and they need to be checked
    >>>> before a decision can be made. The income based (means tested) ESA
    >>>> claim
    >>>> also has to be made before a decision can be made on eligibility as
    >>>> your
    >>>> circumstances, income etc have to be included in any means test. It
    >>>> isn't as straightforward as just making a quick, educated guess due to
    >>>> the different factors that need to be looked at.
    >>>>
    >>>> The half pay is only an issue if it is income based ESA she is
    >>>> claiming,
    >>>> it doesn't affect the contributions based ESA.- Hide quoted text -
    >>>>
    >>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>>
    >>> Thanks for still showing interest. It is contribution based we are
    >>> claiming. I work and she is on half pay so we know if we were means
    >>> tested we wouldn't get anything. They paid the first week £64.30 then
    >>> asked for payslips and doctors notes and it all went quiet. I rang
    >>> yesterday and spoke to a person handling the case who said they
    >>> thought she was not entitled to benefit if she was receiving half pay!
    >>> But they weren't sure. I can't believe they don't know the procedure.
    >>> regards,
    >>> Richard

    >>
    >> It doesn't matter if she's receiving half pay, full pay or no pay at
    >> all! Sounds like the DWP clerk doesn't know the rules here.
    >> Unfortunately some of the staff receive poor training and aren't
    >> always up with the rules.

    >
    >
    > I think it does matter, how is she going to qualify for ESA on full pay?
    > No pay means she automatically qualifies for cont based ESA subject to
    > the usual checks. Being on half pay while hubby is on full pay is a bit
    > of a puzzler. IMO she wont qualify if she has enough SSP to live on,
    > they may take hubbys income into account here. Who knows?


    I know, which is why I answered the question. You don't and are guessing
    at answers again.

    With respect Niteawk, your answer is wrong and completely misleading.
    For a start, SSP entitlement is exhausted as 28 weeks have passed. The
    next stage is to claim ESA. Secondly conts based ESA is not means tested
    except for people receiving a works pension above a certain amount. A
    person can be in receipt of full pay, half pay, no pay it makes no
    difference to Conts based ESA. It does affect income based ESA. You are
    confusing the two and giving out bad advice.


    >
    > The DWP should inform the claimant in writing of any decision they take.
    > The OP would be better off going to his local CAB for advice on this
    > matter. They may take a while to find the answer to this, but they are
    > generally very good at finding the relevant rules and regs that apply to
    > each case.


    >
     
    Robbie, Jan 16, 2010
    #13
  14. RichardL

    Niteawk Guest

    "Robbie" <> wrote in message

    >> I think it does matter, how is she going to qualify for ESA on full pay?
    >> No pay means she automatically qualifies for cont based ESA subject to
    >> the usual checks. Being on half pay while hubby is on full pay is a bit
    >> of a puzzler. IMO she wont qualify if she has enough SSP to live on, they
    >> may take hubbys income into account here. Who knows?

    >
    > I know, which is why I answered the question. You don't and are guessing
    > at answers again.
    >
    > With respect Niteawk, your answer is wrong and completely misleading. For
    > a start, SSP entitlement is exhausted as 28 weeks have passed. The next
    > stage is to claim ESA. Secondly conts based ESA is not means tested except
    > for people receiving a works pension above a certain amount. A person can
    > be in receipt of full pay, half pay, no pay it makes no difference to
    > Conts based ESA. It does affect income based ESA. You are confusing the
    > two and giving out bad advice.
    >


    Assuming a modicum of intelligence, I fail to see what is misleading about a
    post that simply gives an opinion and advises the OP to visit his local CAB
    for clarification. Perhaps you can enlighten me.

    As an aside SSP is not completely exhausted. The OP's wife is now on SSP at
    half rate.
     
    Niteawk, Jan 16, 2010
    #14
  15. RichardL

    Robbie Guest

    Niteawk wrote:
    >
    > "Robbie" <> wrote in message
    >
    >>> I think it does matter, how is she going to qualify for ESA on full
    >>> pay? No pay means she automatically qualifies for cont based ESA
    >>> subject to the usual checks. Being on half pay while hubby is on full
    >>> pay is a bit of a puzzler. IMO she wont qualify if she has enough SSP
    >>> to live on, they may take hubbys income into account here. Who knows?

    >>
    >> I know, which is why I answered the question. You don't and are
    >> guessing at answers again.
    >>
    >> With respect Niteawk, your answer is wrong and completely misleading.
    >> For a start, SSP entitlement is exhausted as 28 weeks have passed. The
    >> next stage is to claim ESA. Secondly conts based ESA is not means
    >> tested except for people receiving a works pension above a certain
    >> amount. A person can be in receipt of full pay, half pay, no pay it
    >> makes no difference to Conts based ESA. It does affect income based
    >> ESA. You are confusing the two and giving out bad advice.
    >>

    >
    > Assuming a modicum of intelligence, I fail to see what is misleading
    > about a post that simply gives an opinion and advises the OP to visit
    > his local CAB for clarification. Perhaps you can enlighten me.


    Yes, I've given the OP the advice his wife needs. A 6 week wait for a
    CAB appointment is hardly the answer to it. You might be lucky and have
    a CAB that operates an open door policy. Most do not and only take
    pre-arranged appointments.

    There is a procedure that both employer and the DWP should follow once
    an employee has exhausted SSP entitlement and a claim to state sickness
    benefit (ESA) is required. It's not clear here that the employer has
    followed this procedure.

    >
    > As an aside SSP is not completely exhausted. The OP's wife is now on SSP
    > at half rate.
    >


    Wages, not SSP, at half rate. You must have misread. SSP is payable for
    a maximum of 28 weeks, at a set rate, in any one period of sickness.
    Once the 28 weeks is up the person has to claim ESA. Wages have nothing
    to do with this and it is the wages of his wife which have dropped to
    half, not the SSP. Entitlement to SSP has been exhausted.

    For wages this is common in many companies, full wages are paid for X
    weeks during sick absence, half wages for Y weeks and some companies
    then pay pension rate pay for continuing sickness after a further point.
    Some companies pay no wages at all, just SSP and once that has ran out
    then it's ESA or nothing at all. The NHS continue to pay wages but have
    done so at a reduced rate. But wages have nothing to do with SSP or ESA.
     
    Robbie, Jan 16, 2010
    #15
  16. RichardL

    RichardL Guest

    On 16 Jan, 21:08, Robbie <> wrote:
    > Niteawk wrote:
    >
    > > "Robbie" <> wrote in message

    >
    > >>> I think it does matter, how is she going to qualify for ESA on full
    > >>> pay? No pay means she automatically qualifies for cont based ESA
    > >>> subject to the usual checks. Being on half pay while hubby is on full
    > >>> pay is a bit of a puzzler. IMO she wont qualify if she has enough SSP
    > >>> to live on, they may take hubbys income into account here. Who knows?

    >
    > >> I know, which is why I answered the question. You don't and are
    > >> guessing at answers again.

    >
    > >> With respect Niteawk, your answer is wrong and completely misleading.
    > >> For a start, SSP entitlement is exhausted as 28 weeks have passed. The
    > >> next stage is to claim ESA. Secondly conts based ESA is not means
    > >> tested except for people receiving a works pension above a certain
    > >> amount. A person can be in receipt of full pay, half pay, no pay it
    > >> makes no difference to Conts based ESA. It does affect income based
    > >> ESA. You are confusing the two and giving out bad advice.

    >
    > > Assuming a modicum of intelligence, I fail to see what is misleading
    > > about a post that simply gives an opinion and advises the OP to visit
    > > his local CAB for clarification. Perhaps you can enlighten me.

    >
    > Yes, I've given the OP the advice his wife needs. A 6 week wait for a
    > CAB appointment is hardly the answer to it. You might be lucky and have
    > a CAB that operates an open door policy. Most do not and only take
    > pre-arranged appointments.
    >
    > There is a procedure that both employer and the DWP should follow once
    > an employee has exhausted SSP entitlement and a claim to state sickness
    > benefit (ESA) is required. It's not clear here that the employer has
    > followed this procedure.
    >
    >
    >
    > > As an aside SSP is not completely exhausted. The OP's wife is now on SSP
    > > at half rate.

    >
    > Wages, not SSP, at half rate. You must have misread. SSP is payable for
    > a maximum of 28 weeks, at a set rate, in any one period of sickness.
    > Once the 28 weeks is up the person has to claim ESA. Wages have nothing
    > to do with this and it is the wages of his wife which have dropped to
    > half, not the SSP. Entitlement to SSP has been exhausted.
    >
    > For wages this is common in many companies, full wages are paid for X
    > weeks during sick absence, half wages for Y weeks and some companies
    > then pay pension rate pay for continuing sickness after a further point.
    > Some companies pay no wages at all, just SSP and once that has ran out
    > then it's ESA or nothing at all. The NHS continue to pay wages but have
    > done so at a reduced rate. But wages have nothing to do with SSP or ESA.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Thanks Robbie,
    any idea what I can quote (other than your obvious knowledge of the
    subject) to the ill informed DWP clerk.
    kind regards,
    Richard
     
    RichardL, Jan 17, 2010
    #16
  17. RichardL

    Robbie Guest

    RichardL wrote:
    > On 16 Jan, 21:08, Robbie <> wrote:
    >> Niteawk wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Robbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>> I think it does matter, how is she going to qualify for ESA on full
    >>>>> pay? No pay means she automatically qualifies for cont based ESA
    >>>>> subject to the usual checks. Being on half pay while hubby is on full
    >>>>> pay is a bit of a puzzler. IMO she wont qualify if she has enough SSP
    >>>>> to live on, they may take hubbys income into account here. Who knows?
    >>>> I know, which is why I answered the question. You don't and are
    >>>> guessing at answers again.
    >>>> With respect Niteawk, your answer is wrong and completely misleading.
    >>>> For a start, SSP entitlement is exhausted as 28 weeks have passed. The
    >>>> next stage is to claim ESA. Secondly conts based ESA is not means
    >>>> tested except for people receiving a works pension above a certain
    >>>> amount. A person can be in receipt of full pay, half pay, no pay it
    >>>> makes no difference to Conts based ESA. It does affect income based
    >>>> ESA. You are confusing the two and giving out bad advice.
    >>> Assuming a modicum of intelligence, I fail to see what is misleading
    >>> about a post that simply gives an opinion and advises the OP to visit
    >>> his local CAB for clarification. Perhaps you can enlighten me.

    >> Yes, I've given the OP the advice his wife needs. A 6 week wait for a
    >> CAB appointment is hardly the answer to it. You might be lucky and have
    >> a CAB that operates an open door policy. Most do not and only take
    >> pre-arranged appointments.
    >>
    >> There is a procedure that both employer and the DWP should follow once
    >> an employee has exhausted SSP entitlement and a claim to state sickness
    >> benefit (ESA) is required. It's not clear here that the employer has
    >> followed this procedure.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> As an aside SSP is not completely exhausted. The OP's wife is now on SSP
    >>> at half rate.

    >> Wages, not SSP, at half rate. You must have misread. SSP is payable for
    >> a maximum of 28 weeks, at a set rate, in any one period of sickness.
    >> Once the 28 weeks is up the person has to claim ESA. Wages have nothing
    >> to do with this and it is the wages of his wife which have dropped to
    >> half, not the SSP. Entitlement to SSP has been exhausted.
    >>
    >> For wages this is common in many companies, full wages are paid for X
    >> weeks during sick absence, half wages for Y weeks and some companies
    >> then pay pension rate pay for continuing sickness after a further point.
    >> Some companies pay no wages at all, just SSP and once that has ran out
    >> then it's ESA or nothing at all. The NHS continue to pay wages but have
    >> done so at a reduced rate. But wages have nothing to do with SSP or ESA.- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > Thanks Robbie,
    > any idea what I can quote (other than your obvious knowledge of the
    > subject) to the ill informed DWP clerk.
    > kind regards,
    > Richard


    Just to check first: did the employer send out anything relating to SSP
    ending and making a claim for ESA? She should have been sent an SSP1
    claim pack by the employer. That is recognised standard practice the
    employer ought to have followed.

    The form is available to view at:

    www.dwp.gov.uk/advisers/claimforms/ssp1_print.pdf

    (requires Adobe to view)

    The employer is supposed to complete that form and enclose any relevant
    medical certificate that extends beyond the date SSP is payable.

    Did the employer send the form?
     
    Robbie, Jan 17, 2010
    #17
  18. RichardL

    RichardL Guest

    On 17 Jan, 19:26, Robbie <> wrote:
    > RichardL wrote:
    > > On 16 Jan, 21:08, Robbie <> wrote:
    > >> Niteawk wrote:

    >
    > >>> "Robbie" <> wrote in message
    > >>>>> I think it does matter, how is she going to qualify for ESA on full
    > >>>>> pay? No pay means she automatically qualifies for cont based ESA
    > >>>>> subject to the usual checks. Being on half pay while hubby is on full
    > >>>>> pay is a bit of a puzzler. IMO she wont qualify if she has enough SSP
    > >>>>> to live on, they may take hubbys income into account here. Who knows?
    > >>>> I know, which is why I answered the question. You don't and are
    > >>>> guessing at answers again.
    > >>>> With respect Niteawk, your answer is wrong and completely misleading.
    > >>>> For a start, SSP entitlement is exhausted as 28 weeks have passed. The
    > >>>> next stage is to claim ESA. Secondly conts based ESA is not means
    > >>>> tested except for people receiving a works pension above a certain
    > >>>> amount. A person can be in receipt of full pay, half pay, no pay it
    > >>>> makes no difference to Conts based ESA. It does affect income based
    > >>>> ESA. You are confusing the two and giving out bad advice.
    > >>> Assuming a modicum of intelligence, I fail to see what is misleading
    > >>> about a post that simply gives an opinion and advises the OP to visit
    > >>> his local CAB for clarification. Perhaps you can enlighten me.
    > >> Yes, I've given the OP the advice his wife needs. A 6 week wait for a
    > >> CAB appointment is hardly the answer to it. You might be lucky and have
    > >> a CAB that operates an open door policy. Most do not and only take
    > >> pre-arranged appointments.

    >
    > >> There is a procedure that both employer and the DWP should follow once
    > >> an employee has exhausted SSP entitlement and a claim to state sickness
    > >> benefit (ESA) is required. It's not clear here that the employer has
    > >> followed this procedure.

    >
    > >>> As an aside SSP is not completely exhausted. The OP's wife is now on SSP
    > >>> at half rate.
    > >> Wages, not SSP, at half rate. You must have misread. SSP is payable for
    > >> a maximum of 28 weeks, at a set rate, in any one period of sickness.
    > >> Once the 28 weeks is up the person has to claim ESA. Wages have nothing
    > >> to do with this and it is the wages of his wife which have dropped to
    > >> half, not the SSP. Entitlement to SSP has been exhausted.

    >
    > >> For wages this is common in many companies, full wages are paid for X
    > >> weeks during sick absence, half wages for Y weeks and some companies
    > >> then pay pension rate pay for continuing sickness after a further point.
    > >> Some companies pay no wages at all, just SSP and once that has ran out
    > >> then it's ESA or nothing at all. The NHS continue to pay wages but have
    > >> done so at a reduced rate. But wages have nothing to do with SSP or ESA.- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > > Thanks Robbie,
    > > any idea what I can quote (other than your obvious knowledge of the
    > > subject) to the ill informed DWP clerk.
    > > kind regards,
    > > Richard

    >
    > Just to check first: did the employer send out anything relating to SSP
    > ending and making a claim for ESA? She should have been sent an SSP1
    > claim pack by the employer. That is recognised standard practice the
    > employer ought to have followed.
    >
    > The form is available to view at:
    >
    > www.dwp.gov.uk/advisers/claimforms/ssp1_print.pdf
    >
    > (requires Adobe to view)
    >
    > The employer is supposed to complete that form and enclose any relevant
    > medical certificate that extends beyond the date SSP is payable.
    >
    > Did the employer send the form?- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Yes they did albeit late.
    Can you point me to anything re your view on the ESA claim when on
    half pay. I've looked and looked and found nothing other than "you
    might..."
    Richard
     
    RichardL, Jan 17, 2010
    #18
  19. RichardL

    Robbie Guest

    RichardL wrote:
    > On 17 Jan, 19:26, Robbie <> wrote:
    >> RichardL wrote:
    >>> On 16 Jan, 21:08, Robbie <> wrote:
    >>>> Niteawk wrote:
    >>>>> "Robbie" <> wrote in message
    >>>>>>> I think it does matter, how is she going to qualify for ESA on full
    >>>>>>> pay? No pay means she automatically qualifies for cont based ESA
    >>>>>>> subject to the usual checks. Being on half pay while hubby is on full
    >>>>>>> pay is a bit of a puzzler. IMO she wont qualify if she has enough SSP
    >>>>>>> to live on, they may take hubbys income into account here. Who knows?
    >>>>>> I know, which is why I answered the question. You don't and are
    >>>>>> guessing at answers again.
    >>>>>> With respect Niteawk, your answer is wrong and completely misleading.
    >>>>>> For a start, SSP entitlement is exhausted as 28 weeks have passed. The
    >>>>>> next stage is to claim ESA. Secondly conts based ESA is not means
    >>>>>> tested except for people receiving a works pension above a certain
    >>>>>> amount. A person can be in receipt of full pay, half pay, no pay it
    >>>>>> makes no difference to Conts based ESA. It does affect income based
    >>>>>> ESA. You are confusing the two and giving out bad advice.
    >>>>> Assuming a modicum of intelligence, I fail to see what is misleading
    >>>>> about a post that simply gives an opinion and advises the OP to visit
    >>>>> his local CAB for clarification. Perhaps you can enlighten me.
    >>>> Yes, I've given the OP the advice his wife needs. A 6 week wait for a
    >>>> CAB appointment is hardly the answer to it. You might be lucky and have
    >>>> a CAB that operates an open door policy. Most do not and only take
    >>>> pre-arranged appointments.
    >>>> There is a procedure that both employer and the DWP should follow once
    >>>> an employee has exhausted SSP entitlement and a claim to state sickness
    >>>> benefit (ESA) is required. It's not clear here that the employer has
    >>>> followed this procedure.
    >>>>> As an aside SSP is not completely exhausted. The OP's wife is now on SSP
    >>>>> at half rate.
    >>>> Wages, not SSP, at half rate. You must have misread. SSP is payable for
    >>>> a maximum of 28 weeks, at a set rate, in any one period of sickness.
    >>>> Once the 28 weeks is up the person has to claim ESA. Wages have nothing
    >>>> to do with this and it is the wages of his wife which have dropped to
    >>>> half, not the SSP. Entitlement to SSP has been exhausted.
    >>>> For wages this is common in many companies, full wages are paid for X
    >>>> weeks during sick absence, half wages for Y weeks and some companies
    >>>> then pay pension rate pay for continuing sickness after a further point.
    >>>> Some companies pay no wages at all, just SSP and once that has ran out
    >>>> then it's ESA or nothing at all. The NHS continue to pay wages but have
    >>>> done so at a reduced rate. But wages have nothing to do with SSP or ESA.- Hide quoted text -
    >>>> - Show quoted text -
    >>> Thanks Robbie,
    >>> any idea what I can quote (other than your obvious knowledge of the
    >>> subject) to the ill informed DWP clerk.
    >>> kind regards,
    >>> Richard

    >> Just to check first: did the employer send out anything relating to SSP
    >> ending and making a claim for ESA? She should have been sent an SSP1
    >> claim pack by the employer. That is recognised standard practice the
    >> employer ought to have followed.
    >>
    >> The form is available to view at:
    >>
    >> www.dwp.gov.uk/advisers/claimforms/ssp1_print.pdf
    >>
    >> (requires Adobe to view)
    >>
    >> The employer is supposed to complete that form and enclose any relevant
    >> medical certificate that extends beyond the date SSP is payable.
    >>
    >> Did the employer send the form?- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > Yes they did albeit late.
    > Can you point me to anything re your view on the ESA claim when on
    > half pay. I've looked and looked and found nothing other than "you
    > might..."
    > Richard


    All I can suggest is she contacts the DWP once again and tries to hurry
    things up and perhaps try to speak to someone else at the DWP. Her pay
    is not an issue for contributions based ESA, it would be for income
    based ESA and it appears that either the DWP clerk is getting mixed up
    or is taking a claim for both contributions and income based elements of
    ESA.
     
    Robbie, Jan 18, 2010
    #19
  20. RichardL

    RichardL Guest

    On Jan 18, 11:41 am, Robbie <> wrote:
    > RichardL wrote:
    > > On 17 Jan, 19:26, Robbie <> wrote:
    > >> RichardL wrote:
    > >>> On 16 Jan, 21:08, Robbie <> wrote:
    > >>>> Niteawk wrote:
    > >>>>> "Robbie" <> wrote in message
    > >>>>>>> I think it does matter, how is she going to qualify for ESA on full
    > >>>>>>> pay? No pay means she automatically qualifies for cont based ESA
    > >>>>>>> subject to the usual checks. Being on half pay while hubby is on full
    > >>>>>>> pay is a bit of a puzzler. IMO she wont qualify if she has enoughSSP
    > >>>>>>> to live on, they may take hubbys income into account here. Who knows?
    > >>>>>> I know, which is why I answered the question. You don't and are
    > >>>>>> guessing at answers again.
    > >>>>>> With respect Niteawk, your answer is wrong and completely misleading.
    > >>>>>> For a start, SSP entitlement is exhausted as 28 weeks have passed.The
    > >>>>>> next stage is to claim ESA. Secondly conts based ESA is not means
    > >>>>>> tested except for people receiving a works pension above a certain
    > >>>>>> amount. A person can be in receipt of full pay, half pay, no pay it
    > >>>>>> makes no difference to Conts based ESA. It does affect income based
    > >>>>>> ESA. You are confusing the two and giving out bad advice.
    > >>>>> Assuming a modicum of intelligence, I fail to see what is misleading
    > >>>>> about a post that simply gives an opinion and advises the OP to visit
    > >>>>> his local CAB for clarification. Perhaps you can enlighten me.
    > >>>> Yes, I've given the OP the advice his wife needs. A 6 week wait for a
    > >>>> CAB appointment is hardly the answer to it. You might be lucky and have
    > >>>> a CAB that operates an open door policy. Most do not and only take
    > >>>> pre-arranged appointments.
    > >>>> There is a procedure that both employer and the DWP should follow once
    > >>>> an employee has exhausted SSP entitlement and a claim to state sickness
    > >>>> benefit (ESA) is required. It's not clear here that the employer has
    > >>>> followed this procedure.
    > >>>>> As an aside SSP is not completely exhausted. The OP's wife is now on SSP
    > >>>>> at half rate.
    > >>>> Wages, not SSP, at half rate. You must have misread. SSP is payable for
    > >>>> a maximum of 28 weeks, at a set rate, in any one period of sickness.
    > >>>> Once the 28 weeks is up the person has to claim ESA. Wages have nothing
    > >>>> to do with this and it is the wages of his wife which have dropped to
    > >>>> half, not the SSP. Entitlement to SSP has been exhausted.
    > >>>> For wages this is common in many companies, full wages are paid for X
    > >>>> weeks during sick absence, half wages for Y weeks and some companies
    > >>>> then pay pension rate pay for continuing sickness after a further point.
    > >>>> Some companies pay no wages at all, just SSP and once that has ran out
    > >>>> then it's ESA or nothing at all. The NHS continue to pay wages but have
    > >>>> done so at a reduced rate. But wages have nothing to do with SSP or ESA.- Hide quoted text -
    > >>>> - Show quoted text -
    > >>> Thanks Robbie,
    > >>> any idea what I can quote (other than your obvious knowledge of the
    > >>> subject) to the ill informed DWP clerk.
    > >>> kind regards,
    > >>> Richard
    > >> Just to check first: did the employer send out anything relating to SSP
    > >> ending and making a claim for ESA? She should have been sent an SSP1
    > >> claim pack by the employer. That is recognised standard practice the
    > >> employer ought to have followed.

    >
    > >> The form is available to view at:

    >
    > >>www.dwp.gov.uk/advisers/claimforms/ssp1_print.pdf

    >
    > >> (requires Adobe to view)

    >
    > >> The employer is supposed to complete that form and enclose any relevant
    > >> medical certificate that extends beyond the date SSP is payable.

    >
    > >> Did the employer send the form?- Hide quoted text -

    >
    > >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    > > Yes they did albeit late.
    > > Can you point me to anything re your view on the ESA claim when on
    > > half pay. I've looked and looked and found nothing other than "you
    > > might..."
    > > Richard

    >
    > All I can suggest is she contacts the DWP once again and tries to hurry
    > things up and perhaps try to speak to someone else at the DWP. Her pay
    > is not an issue for contributions based ESA, it would be for income
    > based ESA and it appears that either the DWP clerk is getting mixed up
    > or is taking a claim for both contributions and income based elements of
    > ESA.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Thanks for all your help and patience. One final question.
    When she goes onto no pay - do you think she is entitled to anything?
    Is the contribution based ESA just while she is employed?
    I work and we own our house. Does it depend on wether she gets
    sicknotes or not?
    Thanks,
    Richard
     
    RichardL, Jan 18, 2010
    #20
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