£50 note withdrawal


P

Portsmouth Rider

Fredxx said:
The system is one system. The UK government determines who spends what
with Holyrood tweaking expenditure and some taxes.

One of the differences is in the definition of Legal Tender. (Bank of
England notes are Legal Tender in England, together with coin , up to
certain maxima for small denomination coins . In Scotland, no notes - Bank
of England, Clydesdale, Bank of Scotland, Bank of Auchtermuchty or any
others, are Legal Tender, wheras coin IS Legal Tender (as in England), up to
certain maxima for small denomination coins).

Another is apparently in the right of individual Banks to print their own
paper money. (The Scots have "Clydesdale banknotes" "Bank of Scotland notes"
and, for all I know, there may be others). We have Bank of England notes. -
full stop.

None of the above prevents either English or Scottish notes from being
acceptable in the normal course of business, on either side of the border,
provided both parties agree (which they normally do).
A major issue with separation of Scotland from the Union is going to be
national
debt, especially Salmond's culpability in RBS's failure.
And, indeed, might result in less acceptance of one country's notes in the
other country. Or an Exchange Rate - with a Scottish note worth around 75
pence!!!
 
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O

Ophelia

Portsmouth Rider said:
Can I or can I not pay in an English court using Scottish notes?

----------------------------------------------------

Only if the Court Officer agrees to take them. You can also pay using
your bank debit card - IF the Court Office agrees to take the payment by
that means. Neither, as has been exhaustively and tirelessly explained to
you, makes such method of payment "Legal Tender"...
Now piss off.

We are fed up with you.
Yep!
 
M

Major Scott

Because every individual and every company would have their own idea
about what payment methods are acceptable to them. You couldn't
produce a single "official" list.

Legal Tender is the official list of what is acceptable to settle a
debt in court. Beyond that it's up to each person to decide for
themselves what they will accept.
It should be easy enough with cash. If the Bank of Scotland is allowed to print notes, then why not, at the same time as issuing them with that license, make those notes "legal tender" (which they more or less are anyway!). Either that or make them produce the notes idealistically to the Bank of England ones.
 
M

Major Scott

The definition of Legal Tender is very specific. There are no vagaries
about it. You have been shown links to the Bank of England's clear
definition of Legal Tender, but still you won't accept it.

You can argue with people here about it as long as you like. That
won't change reality.
Yet 99.999999999999999% of people accept non-legal tender. What a farce.
 
M

Major Scott

One of the differences is in the definition of Legal Tender. (Bank of
England notes are Legal Tender in England, together with coin , up to
certain maxima for small denomination coins . In Scotland, no notes - Bank
of England, Clydesdale, Bank of Scotland, Bank of Auchtermuchty or any
others, are Legal Tender, wheras coin IS Legal Tender (as in England), up to
certain maxima for small denomination coins).
Maybe the Scots are not childish enough for notes to have to be officially declared.
Another is apparently in the right of individual Banks to print their own
paper money. (The Scots have "Clydesdale banknotes" "Bank of Scotland notes"
and, for all I know, there may be others). We have Bank of England notes. -
full stop.
It does seem silly to have more than one. It makes detecting forgeries more difficult.
None of the above prevents either English or Scottish notes from being
acceptable in the normal course of business, on either side of the border,
provided both parties agree (which they normally do).


And, indeed, might result in less acceptance of one country's notes in the
other country. Or an Exchange Rate - with a Scottish note worth around 75
pence!!!
Perhaps we would have our own currency. The Euro doesn't appear to work well when shared between countries.
 
M

Major Scott

Whether you think it SHOULD or not is irrelevant. The fact is it
isn't, which is what people have been trying to get you to understand
for the last week.
Oh I see, opinions aren't allowed in here. Can you not think for yourself? Is it so hard to say "it's absurd"?
 
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M

Major Scott

Can I or can I not pay in an English court using Scottish notes?

----------------------------------------------------

Only if the Court Officer agrees to take them. You can also pay usingyour
bank debit card - IF the Court Office agrees to take the payment by that
means. Neither, as has been exhaustively and tirelessly explained to you,
makes such method of payment "Legal Tender"...
Now piss off.

We are fed up with you.
So the court office could decide to be a complete ass and not accept anypayment I have available. What an absolute farce! This has to be one of the most disorganised laws there is. This country doesn't even have a properly set out monetary system!
 
C

Chris Blunt

It does seem silly to have more than one. It makes detecting forgeries more difficult.
Actually, I think you do make a good point there. The more variations
of notes there are, and the more often the designs are changed, the
less familiar ordinary people become with them and the less able they
are to spot forgeries.

Of course one of the reason for changing designs is to keep one step
ahead of the forgers.

Chris
 
C

Chris Blunt

Yet 99.999999999999999% of people accept non-legal tender. What a farce.
Yes, they probably do. That's because private individuals are free to
accept whatever they want.

That's quite different to settlement of a debt in a court, where legal
tender is the only method of payment which must be accepted.

Chris
 
C

Chris Blunt

It should be easy enough with cash. If the Bank of Scotland is allowed to print notes, then why not, at the same time as issuing them with that license, make those notes "legal tender" (which they more or less are anyway!). Either that or make them produce the notes idealistically to the Bank of England ones.
That sounds reasonable, although even if you made Scottish notes legal
tender that would only ensure they were acceptable in court.

You could never create a situation where private individuals or stores
were compelled to accept something. I thought that is what you meant
when you referred to "an official list of what is acceptable, and
everyone has to stick to it".

Chris
 
M

Major Scott

Actually, I think you do make a good point there. The more variations
of notes there are, and the more often the designs are changed, the
less familiar ordinary people become with them and the less able they
are to spot forgeries.

Of course one of the reason for changing designs is to keep one step
ahead of the forgers.
Changing the technical bits like the magnetic strip maybe. But I fail to see the need to change the picture every 5 minutes.
 
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M

Major Scott

Yes, they probably do. That's because private individuals are free to
accept whatever they want.

That's quite different to settlement of a debt in a court, where legal
tender is the only method of payment which must be accepted.
Scottish courts must have big problems then.
 
M

Major Scott

That sounds reasonable, although even if you made Scottish notes legal
tender that would only ensure they were acceptable in court.

You could never create a situation where private individuals or stores
were compelled to accept something. I thought that is what you meant
when you referred to "an official list of what is acceptable, and
everyone has to stick to it".
I meant both.

I accept that a shop could refuse some money BEFORE a transaction. But if it's payment for a service which has ben completed, or something you cannot return (like petrol), then thye should have to accept all legal tender.
 
T

tim.....

Major Scott said:
Changing the technical bits like the magnetic strip maybe. But I fail to
see the need to change the picture every 5 minutes.
though this does make it easier to withdraw the less secure ones

tim
 
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®

®i©ardo

I meant both.

I accept that a shop could refuse some money BEFORE a transaction. But
if it's payment for a service which has ben completed, or something you
cannot return (like petrol), then thye should have to accept all legal
tender.
They do, but that doesn't include Scottish bank notes.
 
M

Major Scott

They do, but that doesn't include Scottish bank notes.
Chris Blunt said "even if you made Scottish notes legal tender that would only ensure they were acceptable in court"
 
A

Anthony R. Gold

Nope, shops are free to refuse anything. Say a 24H petrol station adopts a
policy of only accepting card payments at night to protect their attendant
from being held up, then what would be their offence/civil wrong?
 
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M

Major Scott

Nope, shops are free to refuse anything. Say a 24H petrol station adopts a
policy of only accepting card payments at night to protect their attendant
from being held up, then what would be their offence/civil wrong?
None, but if the customer wasn't fairly warned beforehand, he should getfree petrol.
 

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