£50 note withdrawal


C

Chris Blunt

Scottish courts must have big problems then.
Not really. A creditor would still be free to accept any form of
payment mutually agreed with the debtor. The only thing he could not
refuse would be legal tender. In practice I doubt whether that
situation ever arises.

Chris
 
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C

Chris Blunt

I meant both.

I accept that a shop could refuse some money BEFORE a transaction. But if it's payment for a service which has ben completed, or something you cannot return (like petrol), then thye should have to accept all legal tender.
That is exactly what does happen.

If you take something and use or consume it in a way that makes it
unreturnable then you have created a debt to the person you obtained
it from. If you fail to pay for it in an acceptable way then you can
be sued for recovery of that debt. If the court rules in favour of
your creditor then you will be required to pay, and the creditor will
be compelled to accept your payment as long as you proffer it in legal
tender. That is exactly what legal tender is; a method of payment that
cannot be refused in court as settlement of a debt.

Chris
 
M

Major Scott

Not really. A creditor would still be free to accept any form of
payment mutually agreed with the debtor. The only thing he could not
refuse would be legal tender. In practice I doubt whether that
situation ever arises.
If he was evil enough to try to get the defendant into more trouble.....
 
M

Major Scott

That is exactly what does happen.

If you take something and use or consume it in a way that makes it
unreturnable then you have created a debt to the person you obtained
it from. If you fail to pay for it in an acceptable way then you can
be sued for recovery of that debt. If the court rules in favour of
your creditor then you will be required to pay, and the creditor will
be compelled to accept your payment as long as you proffer it in legal
tender. That is exactly what legal tender is; a method of payment that
cannot be refused in court as settlement of a debt.
So technically in Scotland the petrol station could refuse my Scottish £20 notes, and take me to court. Don't you see how absurd this is?
 
I

Ian Jackson

Major Scott <no@spam.com> said:
So technically in Scotland the petrol station could refuse my Scottish
£20 notes, and take me to court. Don't you see how absurd this is?
So's the idea of Scottish 'independence' - but try telling that to the
Scots (well, some of them).
 
M

Major Scott

So's the idea of Scottish 'independence' - but try telling that to the
Scots (well, some of them).
A lot of Scots laws are more sensible than the English versions. I willbe voting yes to independance.

State why you think it's a bad idea? (I'm only a marginal yes)
 
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C

Cynic

So technically in Scotland the petrol station could refuse my Scottish =A3=
20 notes, and take me to court. Don't you see how absurd this is?
Even worse, the petrol station could refuse to accept *any* form of
cash as payment and accept only cards. In fact that is *exactly* the
case in many petrol stations in my area after a certain time at night.
So if you arrived at the petrol station with an almost empty tank and
only cash in your pocket, you would be stuffed, because the pump won't
switch on unless you insert a valid card.
 
M

Major Scott

Even worse, the petrol station could refuse to accept *any* form of
cash as payment and accept only cards. In fact that is *exactly* the
case in many petrol stations in my area after a certain time at night.
So if you arrived at the petrol station with an almost empty tank and
only cash in your pocket, you would be stuffed, because the pump won't
switch on unless you insert a valid card.
At least in that case you are warned before you start.

It is most unwise to leave your tank that empty. As soon as mine is below half, I fill up at the next convenient station. Saves me having to fill up if I'm in a hurry or something else goes wrong, like you just stated.
 
C

Chris Blunt

If he was evil enough to try to get the defendant into more trouble.....
Nobody is in any trouble. This is simple settlement of a debt.

Chris
 
C

Chris Blunt

So technically in Scotland the petrol station could refuse my Scottish £20 notes, and take me to court. Don't you see how absurd this is?
It might be absurd if it should ever occur, but you've deliberately
taken a very unlikely situation that would probably never happen in
practice. If you're going to do that there are many things in life
that you could show as being absurd.

Chris
 
P

Portsmouth Rider

Chris Blunt said:
It might be absurd if it should ever occur, but you've deliberately
taken a very unlikely situation that would probably never happen in
practice. If you're going to do that there are many things in life
that you could show as being absurd.
In just about every thread in which "Major" Scott (Family Motto - Lumbos
meos caput meum) participates, he wriggles and introduces more and more
unlikely scenarios. He IS in my KF. Not many people are.
 
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M

Major Scott

In just about every thread in which "Major" Scott (Family Motto - Lumbos
meos caput meum) participates, he wriggles and introduces more and more
unlikely scenarios. He IS in my KF. Not many people are.
Yet you continue to reply to replies to me.
 
M

Major Scott

It might be absurd if it should ever occur, but you've deliberately
taken a very unlikely situation that would probably never happen in
practice. If you're going to do that there are many things in life
that you could show as being absurd.
It's not that unlikely. Lots of people don't carry cards on them, they may just have a couple of £20s.
 
C

Chris Blunt

It's not that unlikely. Lots of people don't carry cards on them, they may just have a couple of £20s.
As you said yourself only a couple of days ago, "99.999999999999999%
of people accept non-legal tender".

So based on your own estimates, only 0.00000000000001% would refuse
your Scottish £20 notes.

I call that very unlikely.

Chris
 
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M

Major Scott

As you said yourself only a couple of days ago, "99.999999999999999%
of people accept non-legal tender".

So based on your own estimates, only 0.00000000000001% would refuse
your Scottish £20 notes.

I call that very unlikely.
It would be more likely if anyone actually adhered to "legal tender". Thankfully most of the population have common sense.

And you meant 0.000000000000001%. You said 0.00000000000001% which addsup to 100.000000000000009% in total. Or did you allow for immigration?
 
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