2003 BUG: Loan Accounts were activated for Transaction Download - Accounts gone, Now What???


G

George

Way back when on either 2000, 2001 or 2002, I activated my checking account
for download of transactions.
During the process, a quicken dialogue offered me a list of my other
accounts at that financial institution.
(Quicken Support claims that this list comes from an actual real-time
query to my financial institution for "creditline" accounts.)
A few of the accounts on that list were loans which I had categorized in
Quicken as Liability accounts.
So, for years I have been happily downloading transactions into my loan
accounts which is a wonderful use-case.
Now those loans are paid and finally my financial institution is sending
OL-393, Bad Account Requests.
There is no feature in quicken to deactivate these accounts as Quicken never
intended them to be activiated in the first place.
-->> THERE'S THE BUG -- QUICKEN knew that financial institutions were
labeling loans as credit, did not support loans being downloaded, but
allowed it.
Quicken has offered me 4 hacks to my data that might fix my problem:
1. Go back to a previous version of Quicken ... (the 2nd line never
finished what he was saying here...)
2. Delete the QEL file. This has the electronic transfer account info, but
does not affect the account activation status.
3. Export those accounts to QIF, delete the accounts, recreate them w/o
activation & import the QIF --
4. Export the entire datafile & reimport, but lose all setup info including
loan info, scheduled transactions, memorized transactions,etc....

Number 3, export, recreate accounts & import appears to be a good fix until
you realize that you are left w/complete data corruption afterwards.
The loan transactions are split payments from the primary checking -
1. The splits are deleted and the checking account payments are left
hanging
2. Reimporting makes duplicate transactions in the checking account
going back years.....

I was nicely informed by the 2nd line support rep that "A solution isn't a
solution because it makes the customer happy in the end. A solution is a
solution if it fixes the first problem regardless if it creates another
problem." Think about this....

Quicken's Support Promise:
"A solution isn't a solution because it makes the customer happy in the end.
A solution is a solution if it fixes the first problem regardless if it
creates another problem."

I am stuck with a corrupt datafile that Quicken created and without the
ability to download my banking transactions.
I start my campaign to get more quicken help on Monday.
Any suggestions are eagerly welcome!!


(Nevermind that downloading these loan transactions is VERY useful -- there
were several lame excuses why they decided not to provide that feature....)
 
Ad

Advertisements

J

John Pollard

George wrote:

Quicken has offered me 4 hacks to my data that might fix my problem:
1. Go back to a previous version of Quicken ... (the 2nd line never
finished what he was saying here...)
I can't see how this would help.
2. Delete the QEL file. This has the electronic transfer account
info, but does not affect the account activation status.
I take it you are saying that even with a new QEL file, Quicken still
attempts to download from those closed loan accounts? Otherwise, this
would be by far the best solution.

Have you tried changing financial institution information in Quicken;
editing the account and removing account number and changing the
financial institution name to some variation on the actual name ... or
similar changes? With or without a new QEL file.
3. Export those accounts to QIF, delete the accounts, recreate them
w/o activation & import the QIF --
Comments later.
4. Export the entire datafile & reimport, but lose all setup info
including loan info, scheduled transactions, memorized
transactions,etc....
First, I have Q2002, so I suppose it is possible that Q2003 treats QIF
file data differently, but I don't think so.
Second, you don't lose memorized transactions; they can be
exported/imported.
Third, you did not say anything about attempting this "solution", but
it may be the best choice you have; I would think it worth a shot
anyway. It is a virtual certainty that you are going to have to do
some extra work to get "back to normal"; it seems to me you just have
to accept that and chose the best option.

Number 3, export, recreate accounts & import appears to be a good
fix until you realize that you are left w/complete data corruption
afterwards.
The loan transactions are split payments from the primary checking -
1. The splits are deleted and the checking account payments are
left hanging
2. Reimporting makes duplicate transactions in the checking
account going back years.....
Naturally, I can not quite replicate your situation since I can not
(or won't) create those pesky loan accounts that are secretly enabled
for online access; so I can not say with certainty that what you saw
when you tried option 3 was avoidable.

I setup a test using some live data from a checking account that I use
to pay a mortgage loan. When I imported the checking account
transactions into a test file where I had deleted both the checking
account and the loan account, then re-added them, I did see some
inconsistencies in Quicken's treatment of splits (sometimes - or
always, I tried different situations - dropping one of the split
amounts), but I did not find any duplicate transactions in the
checking account. Perhaps you did not elect "Special Handling for
Transfers" when you imported ... I think you should do this for any
import.

(I could not find any rhyme or reason to the dropping of split lines;
when I tried importing the entire account, only some of the split
transactions were handled incorrectly; but when I tried importing only
about 6 transactions, including one split that had worked correctly
previously and one that had not ... both split transactions had a
split line dropped. It was at that time that I quit my testing of
importing splits. :( )

I also tried exporting and importing my entire Quicken file - about
six years worth of data - and had much better luck than with just the
two accounts. You do need to use the "special handling for transfers"
and you need to look out for Quicken's QIF file match criteria - they
are not the same as the match criteria for non QIF file matches (those
you get when your data comes from web-connect or direct download).
The QIF file match criteria can cause matches which should not be
matches. As far as I can tell, if you are trying to import into an
empty Quicken file, there should be no matches so you will have to
check each compare-to-register window carefully to see if there are
any matches ... if there are, use "Make New" to unmatch them (if you
try "unmatch", you will wind up chasing your tail, as Quicken will
keep trying to match them to seemingly every transaction under the
sun).

I did notice that not 100% of security prices imported, making
Investment account balances "appear" to be incorrect. Just inputting
the current price corrected this problem. You could probably just
make a copy of your MYDATA.QPH file from the old fileset and replace
the QPH file in the new fileset with it (after saving the new QPH
file) and get all your prices correct (and if it doesn't work, you can
easily revert).

If you try exporting/importing your entire Quicken file using a single
QIF file and things don't seem to be coming out right, you could try
exporting everything *but* "transactions" to one QIF file and
exporting *only* "transactions" to another QIF file; then import the
non-transactions first followed by the transactions. I was not
focusing on the details too well, but I think that I may have gotten
better results using the latter technique. By whichever technique, I
did wind up with all non-investment account balances equal to those in
my original file, which was as far as I went with the reconciliation.
[Note: this means that the splits that were not handled correctly in
my test of option 3, were handled correctly in my test of option 4 ...
go figure]. (And I convinced myself that the investment accounts
would have come out right if I had gotten current prices for all
securities ... by doing it for one account <g>).

I believe you would need to setup Scheduled transactions again from
scratch (though not memorized transactions, as I mentioned above), key
in your address book, setup your loans again, plus your financial
institution account information for downloading. There may be more, I
am not up for digging further at the moment, but I do think you might
want to look further into the option 4 approach.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top