Accountancy course


M

markcblackall

Hi all,

I am thinking of doing the B680 Certificate in Accounting with the Open
University. It appears that this can be used as a stepping stone
towards professional qualifications, but what I want to know is, can
this be used to work as a book-keeper - keeping books for various
small companies - and would an accountant still need to be involved to
sumbmit all the yearly figures,paperwork etc.

Regards

Mark
 
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P

Peter Saxton

Hi all,

I am thinking of doing the B680 Certificate in Accounting with the Open
University. It appears that this can be used as a stepping stone
towards professional qualifications, but what I want to know is, can
this be used to work as a book-keeper - keeping books for various
small companies - and would an accountant still need to be involved to
sumbmit all the yearly figures,paperwork etc.

Regards

Mark
I would suggest you studied for professional exams and also got some
practical experience. Most other courses are too theoretical.
 
D

Dave T

Peter said:
I would suggest you studied for professional exams and also got some
practical experience. Most other courses are too theoretical.
I agree wholeheartedly. Most professional qualifications start with the
basics anyway. If you don't want to jump in with a chartered
qualification, do AAT or something similar first.

I did AAT before starting ACCA and it gave me a great foundation to work
on. I am now about a year away from ACCA qualification... if I pass the
exams I'm sitting this week and next! (first one tomorrow :( )

Practical experience is key because you will find you can't join a
professional body without suitable experience. Even the AAT require
practical experience in practice or industry.

It's been noted at work in the past that those with accountancy degrees
seem to find professional qualifications harder than those with
non-relevent degrees or (in my case) no degree at all.

Dave T
 
T

Troy Steadman

Dave T said:
It's been noted at work in the past that those with accountancy degrees
seem to find professional qualifications harder than those with
non-relevent degrees or (in my case) no degree at all.

Dave T
Bizarre isn't it that a theoretical knowledge of a subject makes it
difficult to comprehend it in practice. I remember (I am very old) that
when COBOL programmers were being trained up they would accept anyone
with any background *except* programming and IT. They were considered
too set in their ways to be capable of learning.

Good luck with those exams, when you order that new BMW it will all have
been worth it.




--
 
P

Peter Saxton

Bizarre isn't it that a theoretical knowledge of a subject makes it
difficult to comprehend it in practice. I remember (I am very old) that
when COBOL programmers were being trained up they would accept anyone
with any background *except* programming and IT. They were considered
too set in their ways to be capable of learning.
I dont think that having theoretical knowledge is a problem, it's more
the lack of practical knowledge.
 
M

markcblackall

Excuse my ignorance, but is having a chartered qualification required
required, in order to work in this field? Does it allow me to do
certain things that I otherwise couldn't do?

Cheers

Mark
 
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P

Peter Saxton

Excuse my ignorance, but is having a chartered qualification required
required, in order to work in this field? Does it allow me to do
certain things that I otherwise couldn't do?

Cheers

Mark
There's no requirement to have professional qualifications to prepare
accounts only doing auditing.
 
D

Dave T

Peter said:
There's no requirement to have professional qualifications to prepare
accounts only doing auditing.
Would an unqualified accountant be able to get professional indemnity
insurance (as they won't have a practising certificate from a
professional body)?

If not, the OP would presumably leave themselves open to legal action if
they made a mistake.
 
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R

Ronald Raygun

Dave said:
Would an unqualified accountant be able to get professional indemnity
insurance (as they won't have a practising certificate from a
professional body)?

If not, the OP would presumably leave themselves open to legal action if
they made a mistake.
Not necessarily. To err is human, and mere mistakes do not amount to
actionable negligence, especially when the mistake is linked to lack
of specialist knowledge which a qualified person might be expected
to have, but an unqualified person would not. In such cases the
negligence, if any, lies not with the unqualified professional, but
with the client who prefers his inexpensive services to those of a
qualified one.

Provided the OP left his prospective client in no doubt about his
lack of qualifications, he should be all right. An appropriate
disclaimer in his terms of contract would not go amiss.
 

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