Alteration of invoice?


P

PeterSaxton

I thought the date of an invoice should be the tax point, or date of supply.
So sending another invoice with a more recent date would be shifting income
from one tax year to another.  I thought this was frowned upon?

The customer has already paid part, which has caused some confusion, but far
less than even the original invoice.
What is the dispute about?
 
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Z

Zach

Fredxx said:
I appreciate what you say. In the past I have dealt with local customers
which have been more like gentleman's agreements. In this case a mutual
friend put us in contact with each other. This is the first incidence
where the relationship has gone pear shaped where the customer has reneged
on an agreement in order to try and get more work out of me for free.

To be honest, typically the customer's main concern is that knowledge
doesn't find its way to their competitors and is seen to be far more
important than terms and conditions. If I was to put forward terms and
conditions, I may come across as a nit-picking supplier, which might
frighten the customer off, where normally goodwill will prevail.

I'm not sure how having a formal terms and condition would have helped in
this instance, when there is a dispute in contractual delivery, however
weak an excuse, is used to delay and/or prevent payment.

In the past I have taken a companies terms and conditions and modified
them for my own use for the supply of equipment, but this instance is more
a supply of a service, so they weren't really relevant.

Many thanks for all your help. It's very much appreciated.
If the nature of your business is such that terms and conditions would be
overdone and would turn customers away, the focus might be on the contract.
The way you speak of the contract in question suggests that a written
contract is in place. A written contract usually contains terms and
conditions and shouldn't tip the apple cart. If, as I understand what you
wrote, your customers are afraid of losing knowledge, the assurance of their
know-how protection might be in the contract and off-set (balance out) the
issues you yourself wish to protect. But then again, I have no insight into
the nature and size of your business, or in the stage of growth in which
your business currently is.

Regards,
Zach.
www.thinkbones.com
 
F

Fredxx

Zach said:
If the nature of your business is such that terms and conditions
would be overdone and would turn customers away, the focus might be
on the contract. The way you speak of the contract in question
suggests that a written contract is in place. A written contract
usually contains terms and conditions and shouldn't tip the apple
cart. If, as I understand what you wrote, your customers are afraid
of losing knowledge, the assurance of their know-how protection might
be in the contract and off-set (balance out) the issues you yourself
wish to protect. But then again, I have no insight into the nature
and size of your business, or in the stage of growth in which your
business currently is.
There was a written contract, and a non-disclosure-agreement signed to cover
intellectual property. There were nothing in the contract about timely
payment, but was happy to accept what might be called the "industry
standard".

This customer has been a unique experience, and have never known anyone like
him before. Most customers expect a days work for a days pay, and don't
keep moving goalposts in a fixed price contract. Indeed, most customers
want to maintain a good reputation to their suppliers. I suppose alarm
bells should have sounded when a friend had said "he doesn't like paying"!
 
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Z

Zach

Fredxx said:
There was a written contract, and a non-disclosure-agreement signed to
cover intellectual property. There were nothing in the contract about
timely payment, but was happy to accept what might be called the "industry
standard".

This customer has been a unique experience, and have never known anyone
like him before. Most customers expect a days work for a days pay, and
don't keep moving goalposts in a fixed price contract. Indeed, most
customers want to maintain a good reputation to their suppliers. I
suppose alarm bells should have sounded when a friend had said "he doesn't
like paying"!
In certain types of business the "scope" of the project needs explicit
specification in the contract under a separate contract heading.

Zach.
 

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