Backup Files Fail to restore on new system


E

eric_crosby

I had Quicken 2000 installed on a E-Machines computer running WinXP
SP2. The motherrboard died, so I purchased a new lap-top (hp pavilion)
also running WinXP SP2.

I re-installed Quicken and attempted to restore my Quicken file from my
backups. I kept my backups on two sets of three floppies (I would
switch between the two sets each week).

The most recent set fails to import at all (fails with "could not open
file" error).

The previous set restores, but the last 2 years appear to be corrupted
and unusable.

Is there any way to repair either of the backups or locate and fix the
data corruption? I have had some experience in reading and modifying
coded files and have tools to read and modify the coded file, if I
could have some information on the layout format of the Quicken Files.


Thanks in Advance

Eric Crosby
(e-mail address removed)
 
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J

joe

I had Quicken 2000 installed on a E-Machines computer running WinXP
SP2. The motherrboard died, so I purchased a new lap-top (hp pavilion)
also running WinXP SP2.

I re-installed Quicken and attempted to restore my Quicken file from my
backups. I kept my backups on two sets of three floppies (I would
switch between the two sets each week).

The most recent set fails to import at all (fails with "could not open
file" error).

The previous set restores, but the last 2 years appear to be corrupted
and unusable.

Is there any way to repair either of the backups or locate and fix the
data corruption? I have had some experience in reading and modifying
coded files and have tools to read and modify the coded file, if I
could have some information on the layout format of the Quicken Files.


Thanks in Advance

Eric Crosby
(e-mail address removed)
Hope you find a fix.
This does tell me that one should probably NOT count on the Q method
of backing up or restore.
Will the Q company (whoever they are today) be of any realistic help
in this context?
joe
 
D

DP

Will the Q company (whoever they are today) be of any realistic help
in this context?

What does that mean? Quicken has always been produced by Intuit.
 
M

MikeB

I had Quicken 2000 installed on a E-Machines computer running WinXP
SP2. The motherrboard died, so I purchased a new lap-top (hp pavilion)
also running WinXP SP2.

I re-installed Quicken and attempted to restore my Quicken file from my
backups. I kept my backups on two sets of three floppies (I would
switch between the two sets each week).

The most recent set fails to import at all (fails with "could not open
file" error).

The previous set restores, but the last 2 years appear to be corrupted
and unusable.

Is there any way to repair either of the backups or locate and fix the
data corruption? I have had some experience in reading and modifying
coded files and have tools to read and modify the coded file, if I
could have some information on the layout format of the Quicken Files.
I can't help you on the file layout, but you could investigate buying
an external enclosure for the harddrive on the E-Machine and then
attaching the external enclosure to your laptop to transfer the files
that way. Also invest in two USB Flash drives. They are cheap and
really great for backups. Floppies are so 20th Century!
 
O

O Cachorro

Hope you find a fix.
This does tell me that one should probably NOT count on the Q method
of backing up or restore.
Will the Q company (whoever they are today) be of any realistic help
in this context?
joe
I wouldn't be too quick to blame Quicken on this. At work, we have db files
that are exported to floppies, and hand delivered to users that work out in
the oil fields to put on their laptops. It's not unusual for these files to
get corrupted, with the same error as the OP has. Users have even exported
the files, walked across the room to another computer, and no longer able
to access those files... Those floppies nowadays are very cheap. And I
would guess very cheaply made. As another poster suggested, invest in a USB
thumb drive.
 
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R

R. C. White

Hi, Eric.

Did the dying mobo kill the HD, too? If not, then simply remove the HD from
the old computer and hook it up (temporarily?) to the new computer. Then
start Quicken on the new computer, click File | Open and browse to the
Quicken folder on the old HD. Once your file is open in the new Quicken,
just use Backup to put it where you want it on the new HD.

Then you can reformat the old HD and have more storage space. ;<) After
you get the rest of your good files off it, of course.

RC
 
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