Bookeepers role


F

Fafurd

I'm just starting an 'S' Corp and trying to get things
together. In trying to understand the many pieces, my
friend recommended a bookeeper. Since I don't mind entering
my own data, into Quickbooks, what is the role of a
bookeeper? What additional services to they provide that I
would otherwise not desire to worry about? Would it just
make more sense to talk with an accountant (or CPA), work
togehter to develop a chart of accounts, maintain my own
records and then just submit my whole Quickbooks file to the
accountant at specific times? I'm abviously assuming they
will work with a Quickbooks file. For payroll services, I
was thinking of using the Intuit payroll services, through
Costco's.

Any advise would be appreciated.

Thanks.
 
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G

Gene E. Utterback, EA

Fafurd said:
I'm just starting an 'S' Corp and trying to get things
together. In trying to understand the many pieces, my
friend recommended a bookeeper. Since I don't mind entering
my own data, into Quickbooks, what is the role of a
bookeeper? What additional services to they provide that I
would otherwise not desire to worry about? Would it just
make more sense to talk with an accountant (or CPA), work
togehter to develop a chart of accounts, maintain my own
records and then just submit my whole Quickbooks file to the
accountant at specific times? I'm abviously assuming they
will work with a Quickbooks file. For payroll services, I
was thinking of using the Intuit payroll services, through
Costco's.
QB has certain limitations - as do most automated systems.
Have you checked to see if QB is suitable for your business?
We recently ran across an accountant who had picked up a
new client that was using QB and was having all kinds of
problems that they could not figure out. All it took was
literally a 30-second look at the tax return to see why QB
was not suitable for them.

Regarding the use of a bookkeeper - there are several things
all good professionals should bring to your team. They all
relate back to expertise. When you use a professional
bookkeeper you should get several benefits - 1) speed and
efficiency of data entry. How long will it take you to do
the data entry and how much else will you be missing out on
because of it?; 2) consistency - most business owners that
do their own data entry are not consistent either about how
they enter the data or when they enter the data. I can't
tell you how many clients come in who have done their own
bookkeeping and have P&Ls that are six pages long because
they have accounts for Telephone, phone, telephone, Phone,
Verizon, MCI, Sprint, sprint, and whatever. I also can't
tell you how many clients cancel their semi-annual tax
planning meetings because they have not gotten around to
actually doing the data entry. Hence, they have NO grasp of
where they either financially or from a tax perspective; 3)
basic analytical help. Most good bookkeepers, and all good
accountants, will usually scan over the resulting financial
statements and bring anomaly's to your attention.

Good luck,
Gene E. Utterback, EA
 
R

Richard Garrett

QB has certain limitations - as do most automated systems.
Have you checked to see if QB is suitable for your business?
We recently ran across an accountant who had picked up a
new client that was using QB and was having all kinds of
problems that they could not figure out. All it took was
literally a 30-second look at the tax return to see why QB
was not suitable for them.

Regarding the use of a bookkeeper - there are several things
all good professionals should bring to your team. They all
relate back to expertise. When you use a professional
bookkeeper you should get several benefits - 1) speed and
efficiency of data entry. How long will it take you to do
the data entry and how much else will you be missing out on
because of it?; 2) consistency - most business owners that
do their own data entry are not consistent either about how
they enter the data or when they enter the data. I can't
tell you how many clients come in who have done their own
bookkeeping and have P&Ls that are six pages long because
they have accounts for Telephone, phone, telephone, Phone,
Verizon, MCI, Sprint, sprint, and whatever. I also can't
tell you how many clients cancel their semi-annual tax
planning meetings because they have not gotten around to
actually doing the data entry. Hence, they have NO grasp of
where they either financially or from a tax perspective; 3)
basic analytical help. Most good bookkeepers, and all good
accountants, will usually scan over the resulting financial
statements and bring anomaly's to your attention.
When looking for a bookeeper or accountant, I would suggest
that you look for someone with experience in your business.
You do not want to wast the time of training a bookeeper or
account so that they understand your business. A person
familar with your business will bring a lot to you. They
will know how to best handled transactions unigue to your
business and bring your financial statement and tax planning
ideas.
 
E

ed

Fafurd said:
I'm just starting an 'S' Corp and trying to get things
together. In trying to understand the many pieces, my
friend recommended a bookeeper. Since I don't mind entering
my own data, into Quickbooks, what is the role of a
bookeeper? What additional services to they provide that I
would otherwise not desire to worry about? Would it just
make more sense to talk with an accountant (or CPA), work
togehter to develop a chart of accounts, maintain my own
records and then just submit my whole Quickbooks file to the
accountant at specific times? I'm abviously assuming they
will work with a Quickbooks file. For payroll services, I
was thinking of using the Intuit payroll services, through
Costco's.
Off the subject, but note that you spelled bookkeeper wrong.
It is easy to remember as it is the ONLY word in the
English Language wih three different double letters in it,
let alone with no interveneing letter.

ed
 
B

Beth

Off the subject, but note that you spelled bookkeeper wrong.
It is easy to remember as it is the ONLY word in the
English Language wih three different double letters in it,
let alone with no interveneing letter.
Who really cares and what does it have to do with answering
the original question.??!!! I am somewhat dyslexic and my
son is moderately to severly dyslexic. He is very smart,
but he cannot spell. And most of the time spell checking
programs do not help because he cannot recognize which of
the words that are listed is the correct one.

As for the original question, a GOOD bookkeeper (did I spell
that right??) can be very valuable to a business, and can
save you time and money. My husband's business was
bookkeeping. He would help the clients get set up correctly
in quickbooks, train them how to use it effectively.
Depending on the client, he would go to their office once a
week, once a month, sometimes only once a year. He would do
bank recs, sales tax returns, payroll tax returns, make sure
the information they had inputted was correct. etc. So by
the time it came to me to do their tax return, I KNEW that I
would only have to do a couple of journal entries. This
saved the clients alot of money from what I would have
charged them at my CPA rates. And it freed up the clients
to do what they do best.....running their business.

Beth E. Milton, CPA
 
C

cmkey

Off the subject, but note that you spelled bookkeeper wrong.
It is easy to remember as it is the ONLY word in the
English Language wih three different double letters in it,
let alone with no interveneing letter.
Bitterroot - though it does have an intervening letter. It
is (to my knowledge) a plant discovered by Lewis & Clark
(secondary to the Native Americans discovering it) in
present day Montana. Hence - Bitterroot Valley, Bitterroot
River, etc etc etc. Just for your info - not to criticize.
You never know when you might need it on Jeopardy!
 
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J

jake johnson

Gene E. Utterback said:
QB has certain limitations - as do most automated systems.
Have you checked to see if QB is suitable for your business?
We recently ran across an accountant who had picked up a
new client that was using QB and was having all kinds of
problems that they could not figure out. All it took was
literally a 30-second look at the tax return to see why QB
was not suitable for them.
Gene,
I'm intrigued by your comment that a 30-second glance at a
client's return could show why QB wasn't suited for them.
Performance issues are common for clients who outgrow QB,
but it appears that you're referring to a more critical
issue. Please elaborate. (I tried sending email to you,
but it bounced.)

thanks -
- Jake
 
E

ed

Who really cares and what does it have to do with answering
the original question.??!!! I am somewhat dyslexic and my
son is moderately to severly dyslexic. > Beth E. Milton, CPA
Well, Beth, the OP DID ask for ANY suggestions and we can
all learn something here, and what is the relavance of your
son's dyslexia? cmkey corrected me and I really appreciate
his addition to my trivia base as much as your bookkeeping
suggestion to reduce CPA costs. ed
 
G

Gene E. Utterback, EA

Gene,
I'm intrigued by your comment that a 30-second glance at a
client's return could show why QB wasn't suited for them.
Performance issues are common for clients who outgrow QB,
but it appears that you're referring to a more critical
issue. Please elaborate. (I tried sending email to you,
but it bounced.)
Jake - QB itself tells us that QB is not suitable for
businesses who want - or need - to use any inventory method
other than Average Cost. I also believe that QB itself says
it isn't suitable for businesses whose income exceeds a
certain dollar amount - my memory tells me the cutoff is
$5,000,000 but I could be remembering wrong on this.

In the case I'm referring to, the client - a retail grocer
with $10M+ in annual revenues and a FIFO inventory system
was having difficulty with QB because they couldn't get QB's
inventory cost to reconcile with their inventory control
software's inventory cost and they couldn't figure out why.

Gene E. Utterback, EA
 
C

cmkey

Off the subject, but note that you spelled bookkeeper wrong.
Bitterroot - though it does have an intervening letter. It
is (to my knowledge) a plant discovered by Lewis & Clark
(secondary to the Native Americans discovering it) in
present day Montana. Hence - Bitterroot Valley, Bitterroot
River, etc etc etc. Just for your info - not to criticize.
You never know when you might need it on Jeopardy!
Oops - found another - committee. But you still win the
"no intervening letter" prize. *grin*
 
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A

Angela Thornton

Off the subject, but note that you spelled bookkeeper wrong.
Bitterroot - though it does have an intervening letter. It
is (to my knowledge) a plant discovered by Lewis & Clark
(secondary to the Native Americans discovering it) in
present day Montana. Hence - Bitterroot Valley, Bitterroot
River, etc etc etc. Just for your info - not to criticize.
You never know when you might need it on Jeopardy!
Bookkeeper is the only one to have them consecutively.

A
 
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