Can I get a second extension? (Fed and NYS...)


K

Kevin

There is an open issue and I can't file until I resolve it. It doesn't seem
like it will be settled anytime soon.

I will get a small refund, both Federal and NYS, no matter what happens.
Can I get a second extension?

I can file and then file an ammended return as needed, but I have heard that
significantly increases your audit chances.
 
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M

Mark Bole

Kevin said:
There is an open issue and I can't file until I resolve it. It doesn't seem
like it will be settled anytime soon.
You're the same Kevin with the questions about the installment sale from
a month or two ago, right?

I'm still trying to figure out if what you mean by "escrow" is the same
thing as what I mean... ;-)

I will get a small refund, both Federal and NYS, no matter what happens.
Can I get a second extension?
No.


I can file and then file an ammended return as needed, but I have heard that
significantly increases your audit chances.
Probably no more so than filing late... but I'm not sure "what you
heard" is true or relevant. There are always some audits that are
conducted purely at random, so your best bet is to have good record-keeping.

-Mark Bole
 
A

Arthur Kamlet

Probably no more so than filing late... but I'm not sure "what you
heard" is true or relevant. There are always some audits that are
conducted purely at random, so your best bet is to have good record-keeping.

On the one hand, every amended return is looked at by a real, live
tax-knowldgeable IRS employee, so in that regard, the return will
be scrutinized more.


But an audit is merely a verificaion that what has been reported is
correct. Yes, it can cause work to be done, but I don't believe
fear of audit should stop taxpayers from claiming their correct
income, deductions and credits.
 
A

Alan

Arthur said:
On the one hand, every amended return is looked at by a real, live
tax-knowldgeable IRS employee, so in that regard, the return will
be scrutinized more.


But an audit is merely a verificaion that what has been reported is
correct. Yes, it can cause work to be done, but I don't believe
fear of audit should stop taxpayers from claiming their correct
income, deductions and credits.
I'm taken by your use of the term: "real, live tax-knowldgeable
(sic) IRS employee". It evokes an image of having one's tax
return reviewed by someone other than the person you describe:
Such as a dead person, who is impersonating an IRS employee who
knows nothing about taxes.
 
A

Arthur Kamlet

I'm taken by your use of the term: "real, live tax-knowldgeable
(sic) IRS employee". It evokes an image of having one's tax
return reviewed by someone other than the person you describe:
Such as a dead person, who is impersonating an IRS employee who
knows nothing about taxes.

OK.


I was trying to distinguish between computer-processed returns,
not seen by any tax employee, and also to distinguish a tax person
from a data entry clerk.


A 1040X is seen by someone with tax knowledge, and is not merely
fed through a computer.
 
M

Mark Bole

Arthur said:
I was trying to distinguish between computer-processed returns,
not seen by any tax employee, and also to distinguish a tax person
from a data entry clerk.


A 1040X is seen by someone with tax knowledge, and is not merely
fed through a computer.
I'll take your word for it; I thought 1040X might be keypunched by a
data clerk just like an original paper-filed 1040.

One difference, though, is that with a 1040X, normally only the *change*
from the original, and the explanation of the change, is submitted.
Anything else on the original return not being changed would not
normally call for extra scrutiny, right? Or does the person reviewing
the amendment automatically take time to call up the original, even if
the column A numbers match correctly?

I wonder if an amendment with an additional balance due is treated any
differently from one claiming a refund?

-Mark Bole
 
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D

dpb

The computer isn't an employee??? said:
I'll take your word for it; I thought 1040X might be keypunched by a
data clerk just like an original paper-filed 1040.
....

My experience w/ having filed an amended this year that generated a
totally worthless (from the viewpoint of figuring out what the IRS
thinks the problem is) letter would make me think it's simply keypunched
(and not necessarily very accurately... :) ).
I wonder if an amendment with an additional balance due is treated any
differently from one claiming a refund?
....

I don't know; my amended return was for a larger refund than I had
initially calculated owing to having inadvertently left of one quarter's
estimated payments; the letter reference above ended up claiming nearly
$1K in additional tax owed despite no changes in
income/deductions/anything other than the amount paid in was more than
initially stated which amount resulted in a small refund.

--
 
B

Bill Brown

I'm taken by your use of the term: "real, live tax-knowldgeable
(sic) IRS employee". It evokes an image of having one's tax
return reviewed by someone other than the person you describe:
Such as a dead person, who is impersonating an IRS employee who
knows nothing about taxes.
Dead people impersonating an IRS employees who know nothing about
taxes. What a GREAT IDEA for a zombie movie.
 
K

Kevin

Mark Bole said:
You're the same Kevin with the questions about the installment sale from a
month or two ago, right?

I'm still trying to figure out if what you mean by "escrow" is the same
thing as what I mean... ;-)
Yup, and that is the issue.
I have gotten past the question of it being an installment sale, and am now
stumbling over imputed interest.
 
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T

Taxmanhog

Alan said:
"Bill Brown Wrote:
Dead people impersonating an IRS employees who know nothing about
taxes. What a GREAT IDEA for a zombie movie.
Funny........

Tingle Table operators (Clerks), are the first employees to take a gander at
the return.
Not much skill required here, they may be mistaken for casting in such a
movie (only joking) ;->

Code & Editors (Tax Examiners), are the second group, they look at various
items on the return. Placing special codes to be input by data.

The data entry folks (clerks), key everything just as it appears on the
return, including preparer created errors, along with the C/E markings. ;-)

A percentage of the returns in each production Block, may require review by
an Error Resolution Specialist (Tax examiner), they debug preparer & key
entry errors, possibly generating contact letters to seek resolution of what
you would think are simple fixes.

The remaining returns including those resolved by ERS go to short term
storage, awaiting selection for subsequent claims for refund or assessment
of liability (1040x), CP2000 (under reporter review), this work is done by
(Tax Examiners with greater skills) or Full Audit (by your friendly officer
Auditor or Field Revenue Agent :)
 

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