Card Not Present transactions


M

Matt

When ordering goods over the web etc. that require a delivery address
that is different to the card address, am I right in saying that the
(normal)card details (number, exp date...) are entered to the
retailers terminal and could be accepted if it is below their floor
limit, as there is no method of ensuring that the delivery address is
the cardholders (registered address) and it is only when the card
terminal requires authorisation, that the address is checked (over the
phone?)

Since there must be many transactions like this. It can only be a few
tranactions that are actually checked (manually)?

I have noticed that not all websites have the facility for entering
the invoicing address, just a delivery address.

I am aware that Amex? only allows goods to be delivered to the
cardholders address but if the situation is as above, how does it
ensure this?
 
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P

Peter Saxton

When ordering goods over the web etc. that require a delivery address
that is different to the card address, am I right in saying that the
(normal)card details (number, exp date...) are entered to the
retailers terminal and could be accepted if it is below their floor
limit, as there is no method of ensuring that the delivery address is
the cardholders (registered address) and it is only when the card
terminal requires authorisation, that the address is checked (over the
phone?)

Since there must be many transactions like this. It can only be a few
tranactions that are actually checked (manually)?

I have noticed that not all websites have the facility for entering
the invoicing address, just a delivery address.

I am aware that Amex? only allows goods to be delivered to the
cardholders address but if the situation is as above, how does it
ensure this?
What about people with two or more addresses? Do they take out credit
cards at different addresses so they can use one for each place they
require deliveries?
 
C

Chris

What about people with two or more addresses? Do they take out credit
cards at different addresses so they can use one for each place they
require deliveries?
I did hear talk a while ago of supporting a second designated registered
address for deliveries that could also be confirmed (ie for students, 2nd
homeowners, peoples offices for daytime deliverys etc.) don't know if
anything came of it.
 
T

Tumbleweed

Chris said:
I did hear talk a while ago of supporting a second designated registered
address for deliveries that could also be confirmed (ie for students, 2nd
homeowners, peoples offices for daytime deliverys etc.) don't know if
anything came of it.
You can certainly contact your cc co and have other addresses than your home
one as authorised for delivery.
 
S

sks

Matt said:
When ordering goods over the web etc. that require a delivery address
that is different to the card address, am I right in saying that the
(normal)card details (number, exp date...) are entered to the
retailers terminal and could be accepted if it is below their floor
limit, as there is no method of ensuring that the delivery address is
the cardholders (registered address) and it is only when the card
terminal requires authorisation, that the address is checked (over the
phone?)
There is a £0 floor limit on CardHOLDER NP transactions.

Electronically they check your address and get a code to show how 'good' a
match it is.
Since there must be many transactions like this. It can only be a few
tranactions that are actually checked (manually)?
Ours are set up to require manual intervention on any orders where the
delivery address doesn't equal your cardholder address.

You can add multiple addresses to your card with most issuers you know.
 
A

Adrian Boliston

Electronically they check your address and get a code to show how 'good' a
match it is.
It's something like house number and numbers from postcode that now need to be
entered into the terminal i think on cnp's.
 
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M

Matt

sks said:
There is a £0 floor limit on CardHOLDER NP transactions.

Electronically they check your address and get a code to show how 'good' a
match it is.
How? If all the terminals require is card no. exp. date, start date...
Are there special card CNP terminals. I am sure that not all
retailers computer systems are hooked up electronically to the credit
card providers, ie no one at the retailers end typing your card no
into a POS terminal.
 
P

Peter Saxton

How? If all the terminals require is card no. exp. date, start date...
Are there special card CNP terminals. I am sure that not all
retailers computer systems are hooked up electronically to the credit
card providers, ie no one at the retailers end typing your card no
into a POS terminal.
House number and part of post code are requested now but the merchant
can choose to not input them but then will be liable for any loss.
 
S

sks

Matt said:
"sks" <[email protected]> wrote in message

How? If all the terminals require is card no. exp. date, start date...
Are there special card CNP terminals. I am sure that not all
retailers computer systems are hooked up electronically to the credit
card providers, ie no one at the retailers end typing your card no
into a POS terminal.
Most providers now require you to have a special card machine if you're not
running electronically. This special one asks you to enter house number and
postcode.
 
S

sks

Adrian Boliston said:
It's something like house number and numbers from postcode that now need to be
entered into the terminal i think on cnp's.
Only if you're using a terminal and not an electronic gateway.

And yes it's the numbers from your address / postcode.
 
S

Stephen Burke

Matt said:
I have noticed that not all websites have the facility for entering
the invoicing address, just a delivery address.
Retailers are free to take the risk, if it goes wrong the card company just
takes the money back from them.
 
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R

Richard Buttrey

When ordering goods over the web etc. that require a delivery address
that is different to the card address, am I right in saying that the
(normal)card details (number, exp date...) are entered to the
retailers terminal and could be accepted if it is below their floor
limit, as there is no method of ensuring that the delivery address is
the cardholders (registered address) and it is only when the card
terminal requires authorisation, that the address is checked (over the
phone?)

Since there must be many transactions like this. It can only be a few
tranactions that are actually checked (manually)?

I have noticed that not all websites have the facility for entering
the invoicing address, just a delivery address.

I am aware that Amex? only allows goods to be delivered to the
cardholders address but if the situation is as above, how does it
ensure this?
This posting suggests that when transactions go for authorisation, the
delivery address held by the retailer is compared with the cardholders
registered address held by the bank.

I wasn't aware of that. It seems a quite unwieldy system. It would
necessitate widely differing retailers' software being able to
communicate with banks' software. I can't see it somehow.

Is this indeed the case?

Rgds
 
P

Peter Saxton

This posting suggests that when transactions go for authorisation, the
delivery address held by the retailer is compared with the cardholders
registered address held by the bank.

I wasn't aware of that. It seems a quite unwieldy system. It would
necessitate widely differing retailers' software being able to
communicate with banks' software. I can't see it somehow.

Is this indeed the case?

Rgds
Why does it need more than the house number and post code? This is
what is required for authorisation in any CNP transaction now.
 
T

Tim

This posting suggests that when transactions go for authorisation, the
delivery address held by the retailer is compared with the cardholders
registered address held by the bank.
So, the address (or just house name/number & postcode) are sent from the
retailer to the bank - does the retailer specifically have authority to pass
this data to the bank, considering DPA issues? The retailers never seem to
ask for the customer's permission to pass their details on in this way ...
 
P

Peter Saxton

So, the address (or just house name/number & postcode) are sent from the
retailer to the bank - does the retailer specifically have authority to pass
this data to the bank, considering DPA issues? The retailers never seemto
ask for the customer's permission to pass their details on in this way ....
I wouldn't be surprised if when you apply for a card you agree to
this.
 
F

Far

On a similar note, for many years now whenever I have shopped at Index, as
soon as they swipe my credit card not only my name but full address comes up
on the computer screen - this is with a standard Barclaycard not an Index
card or anything unusual.

Regards,
Far

So, the address (or just house name/number & postcode) are sent from the
retailer to the bank - does the retailer specifically have authority to pass
this data to the bank, considering DPA issues? The retailers never seem to
ask for the customer's permission to pass their details on in this way ...
I wouldn't be surprised if when you apply for a card you agree to
this.
 
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C

Chris

Far said:
On a similar note, for many years now whenever I have shopped at Index, as
soon as they swipe my credit card not only my name but full address comes up
on the computer screen - this is with a standard Barclaycard not an Index
card or anything unusual.

Regards,
Far
Had you ever given them the details... eg. ordered goods from them using
that card for home delivery.

I would have though that that is really a bit dodgy otherwise, as I see it
there is a bit of a difference between the retailer providing an address
they have been given to the card issuer to verify it and the card issuer
sending someone your address for no good reason other than them wanting to
know it (probably for marketing purposes. I know that if you read the small
print of some supermarkets condition of sales they state that your payment
card details and details of your shopping may be stored for sales profiling
purposes - regardless of whether you have a loyalty card or not, maybe that
is why some stopped them - they could get reasonable sets of trends and
patterns regardless of whether they know the customer's address)
 
J

john boyle

Far said:
On a similar note, for many years now whenever I have shopped at Index, as
soon as they swipe my credit card not only my name but full address comes up
on the computer screen - this is with a standard Barclaycard not an Index
card or anything unusual.
This not barclaycard supplying the info but Index relating your card
number to your address which you will have given them at some time in
the past.
 
T

Tim

This not barclaycard supplying the info but Index relating your card
number to your address which you will have given them at some time in
the past.
So Index are storing peoples credit card numbers long-term, ie well after
the earlier transaction(s) have taken place? Doesn't DPA require data only
to be held for a reasonable time, for the purpose to which it is needed - so
if just used for a transaction, the card details should not be kept for
longer than necessary?? ...
 
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T

Tim

I wouldn't be surprised if when you apply
for a card you agree to this.
Isn't that the wrong way around?
You might have agreed that the *credit card company* could pass your details
to a retailer, when applying for the credit card.

But have you agreed with the *retailer*, that *they* can pass your details
to the credit card company?? :-(
 

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