Compulsory water metering


A

Adam

What I don't understand is why this is a news story at all in 2006. My water
company, Thames Water, installed a water meter at my house about 8 years
ago. I had no choice in this, which in my view means that compulsory water
metering is not exactly new.

Strangely enough, on the very same day I got the letter from them telling me
I had to have my water metered whether I liked it or not, their Chief
Executive was interviewed on BBC Radio 4 about water metering and gave a
categorical assurance that no-one would have to have water metering if they
didn't want it. I phoned the Chief Executive's office to ask about this
apparent inconsistency, and was told that "I was using a very restrictive
definition of the word 'no-one'".

Perhaps this is the first time the policy has been tested in court, but it's
certainly not the first time water metering has been compulsory.

Adam

PS Apologies if this post appears twice. I think my first attempt to post it
vanished into the aether, but I guess it may have just been delayed.
 
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T

Tiddy Ogg

What I don't understand is why this is a news story at all in 2006. My water
company, Thames Water, installed a water meter at my house about 8 years
ago.
And it's worked all that time?
Flow meters are not exactly the most reliable of items.

Tiddy Ogg.
http://www.tiddyogg.co.uk
 
S

Stickems.

Water meters have been compulsory for new builds for a long time.


| What I don't understand is why this is a news story at all in 2006. My
water
| company, Thames Water, installed a water meter at my house about 8 years
| ago. I had no choice in this, which in my view means that compulsory water
| metering is not exactly new.
|
| Strangely enough, on the very same day I got the letter from them telling
me
| I had to have my water metered whether I liked it or not, their Chief
| Executive was interviewed on BBC Radio 4 about water metering and gave a
| categorical assurance that no-one would have to have water metering if
they
| didn't want it. I phoned the Chief Executive's office to ask about this
| apparent inconsistency, and was told that "I was using a very restrictive
| definition of the word 'no-one'".
|
| Perhaps this is the first time the policy has been tested in court, but
it's
| certainly not the first time water metering has been compulsory.
|
| Adam
|
| PS Apologies if this post appears twice. I think my first attempt to post
it
| vanished into the aether, but I guess it may have just been delayed.
|
|
|
 
N

Nick

Tiddy said:
And it's worked all that time?
Flow meters are not exactly the most reliable of items.
Is that right? The four smallest wheels of my water meter go
round OK when someone has a shower, but the ones that measure
whole cubic metres don't go round any more. So my usage is zero
every time the water company reads it. They don't seem to have
noticed. I expect someone will come around and have a look one day.
What is going to really confuse them is that the house next door
has been removed and has correctly had a zero reading for a year.
Now building has started, and I have allowed the builders to use
an old outhouse toilet and handbasin on my property, using a
water pipe over the fence from their metered supply. The water
company are going to assume wrongly that the builder's pipe
supplies my whole house, and that's why my reading is zero. I may
be able to get away with no water bills for another year (apart
from a low supply charge)!
 
R

Robert

"The four smallest wheels of my water meter go
round OK when someone has a shower, but the ones that measure
whole cubic metres don't go round any more. So my usage is zero
every time the water company reads it. They don't seem to have
noticed. I expect someone will come around and have a look one day. "

I wonder what your legal position will be when they realise and then
present you with a large backdated estimated bill (or the equivalent
unmetered bill). Since you knowlingly allowed the situation to
continue you might end up worse off than if you get it fixed

Robert
 
T

The3rd Earl Of Derby

Robert said:
"The four smallest wheels of my water meter go
round OK when someone has a shower, but the ones that measure
whole cubic metres don't go round any more. So my usage is zero
every time the water company reads it. They don't seem to have
noticed. I expect someone will come around and have a look one day. "

I wonder what your legal position will be when they realise and then
present you with a large backdated estimated bill (or the equivalent
unmetered bill). Since you knowlingly allowed the situation to
continue you might end up worse off than if you get it fixed

Robert
They probably already have him sussed,its not down to the meter reader to
tell him this, as his job is just to read off the digits. :)
 
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D

Daytona

Stickems. said:
Water meters have been compulsory for new builds for a long time.
Since when, I wonder ? Since 1996 in my case.

Daytona
 
A

Alan Holmes

Adam said:
What I don't understand is why this is a news story at all in 2006. My
water
company, Thames Water, installed a water meter at my house about 8 years
ago. I had no choice in this, which in my view means that compulsory water
metering is not exactly new.
About 8 years ago I was asked if I wanted a water meter by Thames Water, I
declined and heard no more about it.

There was no compultion!
 
A

Alan Holmes

Adam said:
What I don't understand is why this is a news story at all in 2006. My
water
company, Thames Water, installed a water meter at my house about 8 years
ago. I had no choice in this, which in my view means that compulsory water
metering is not exactly new.
I wonder if any of the water compaies have thought of installing meters at
the outlets from the water conditioners before it reaches properties, this
would help them to calculate the amount of water leaking from pipes as they
could work out how much people are using against the amount being pumped
into the distribution system.

Alan
 
S

Stickems.

Assuming everybody had a meter and all the meters were read on the same day,
it would be possible.


|
| | > What I don't understand is why this is a news story at all in 2006. My
| > water
| > company, Thames Water, installed a water meter at my house about 8 years
| > ago. I had no choice in this, which in my view means that compulsory
water
| > metering is not exactly new.
|
| I wonder if any of the water compaies have thought of installing meters at
| the outlets from the water conditioners before it reaches properties, this
| would help them to calculate the amount of water leaking from pipes as
they
| could work out how much people are using against the amount being pumped
| into the distribution system.
|
| Alan
|
|
 
J

Jonathan Bryce

Adam said:
Strangely enough, on the very same day I got the letter from them telling
me I had to have my water metered whether I liked it or not, their Chief
Executive was interviewed on BBC Radio 4 about water metering and gave a
categorical assurance that no-one would have to have water metering if
they didn't want it. I phoned the Chief Executive's office to ask about
this apparent inconsistency, and was told that "I was using a very
restrictive definition of the word 'no-one'".
All new houses must have meters, and where you extend a house, you have to
have a meter.

You also need a meter if you want to use a garden sprinkler, or have a
swimming pool.
 
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N

Nick

Robert said:
"The four smallest wheels of my water meter go
round OK when someone has a shower, but the ones that measure
whole cubic metres don't go round any more. So my usage is zero
every time the water company reads it. They don't seem to have
noticed. I expect someone will come around and have a look one day. "

I wonder what your legal position will be when they realise and then
present you with a large backdated estimated bill (or the equivalent
unmetered bill). Since you knowlingly allowed the situation to
continue you might end up worse off than if you get it fixed
Yes, I was considering telling them. But it's not really my
problem. The water company installed the meter which is now
faulty. Any sensible computer system should flag zero or negative
readings for attention. The water bills are paid automatically
from my bank account, so I simply glance at the bill and file it
and do nothing else. I am prepared to pay an amount based on my
usage for the last year. I'm just interested to see how long it
will take for them to notice.

If a utilities company has made a mistake, they tend to be
difficult to deal with, so it's best to avoid that.
The meter reader for my power company made a very large mistake
that implied my usage had doubled. Their computer system didn't
flag that either. When I phoned them, they wanted me to supply a
password for ID (when they had never given me one) then they
would not accept my reading and sent someone around to re-read
the meter.
 
G

Gordon

Nick said:
If a utilities company has made a mistake, they tend to be difficult to
deal with, so it's best to avoid that.
The meter reader for my power company made a very large mistake that
implied my usage had doubled. Their computer system didn't flag that
either.
Uh - was that Powergen by any chance?

The first gas meter reading taken at my g/friend's house after Powergen
contracted out their meter reading to Meter Reading Services Ltd
resulted in a bill which was about 3 times what it should have been.

The idiots had submitted the reading as from an Imperial meter, whereas
it is a metric one, but it took me five months of phone calls and
letters before they were convinced, and eventually when I started
talking about compensation they gave her 5 months of free gas.
 
G

Gordon

Daytona said:
Since when, I wonder ? Since 1996 in my case.
In this area, if you have a meter fitted, you cannot go back to
quarterly billing, and when the house is sold it remains metered.
This could be an adverse situation if a large family were interested in
the purchase, but as I live alone I would certainly save money by having
one installed.

I have heard though, that a more sophisticated and reliable meter will
be available in the not too distant future, so I am uncertain whether to
bother at this time.
 
N

Nick

Gordon said:
Uh - was that Powergen by any chance?

The first gas meter reading taken at my g/friend's house after Powergen
contracted out their meter reading to Meter Reading Services Ltd
resulted in a bill which was about 3 times what it should have been.
No, I'm in New Zealand, the land of d-i-y and No. 8 fencing wire
to fix anything. I'm in uk.d-i-y because you guys seem to discuss
lots of problems that I have, or that I have already solved.

In recent years, power and gas utilities in NZ have been
privatised and nobody knows which company caters for who.

A digger cut through a gasline next door and I phoned 5 gas
companies to stop the leak, but they all denied responsibility.
 
A

Andy Luckman (AJL Electronics)

Stickems. said:
Water meters have been compulsory for new builds for a long time.
Posting in a coherent manner has been recommended for many years, yet you
still don't have a clue.
 
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A

Andy Luckman (AJL Electronics)

Stickems. said:
Assuming everybody had a meter and all the meters were read on the same day,
it would be possible.
It's possible for you to post properly, but you don't.
 
D

Daytona

Gordon said:
In this area, if you have a meter fitted, you cannot go back to
quarterly billing,
You have six months to change you mind here with Southern Water.

Daytona
 
D

Dave

Gordon wrote:

I have heard though, that a more sophisticated and reliable meter will
be available in the not too distant future, so I am uncertain whether to
bother at this time.
I think that the above would be my big concern.

How accurate, when new, is a water meter and will it stay in calibration
indefinitely?

Dave
 
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M

Mary Fisher

Dave said:
Gordon wrote:



I think that the above would be my big concern.

How accurate, when new, is a water meter and will it stay in calibration
indefinitely?
Do you worry about that with your gas and electricity meters?

Or your petrol gauge?

Mary
 

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