Disputed invoices


R

Rev Adrian Kennard

Are there any laws covering disputed invoices?

Specifically, if someone disputes an invoice, and some time later the
dispute is resolved such that they were wrong (i.e. the invoice was
valid and correct all along), is there any reason not to charge late
payment penalties if they apply?

This has only come up because a customer had a dispute where they
received a bill from us and from BT for the same thing. The BT invoice
was wrong, and we told them that when they asked us. They, however,
considered all of the bills, from us and BT to be "in dispute" and did
not pay them until the matter was resolved (by BT sending a credit
note). This took two months on a 30 day terms invoice. Our view is that
our invoice was never validly in dispute anyway, and should have been
paid within terms.

What is the law on things like this?

If someone is allowed to raise bogus disputes in order to delay payment
without penalty, it makes for a nice loophole in the late payment laws.

[In this instance, we have issued a good will credit, but I would be
interested to know if we were right to have charged the penalty anyway]
 
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D

DoobieDo

Are there any laws covering disputed invoices?

What is the law on things like this?
uk.legal is next door... Oh! I see, you asked there as well....
Cheerio
 
A

Alex Heney

Are there any laws covering disputed invoices?

Specifically, if someone disputes an invoice, and some time later the
dispute is resolved such that they were wrong (i.e. the invoice was
valid and correct all along), is there any reason not to charge late
payment penalties if they apply?

This has only come up because a customer had a dispute where they
received a bill from us and from BT for the same thing. The BT invoice
was wrong, and we told them that when they asked us. They, however,
considered all of the bills, from us and BT to be "in dispute" and did
not pay them until the matter was resolved (by BT sending a credit
note). This took two months on a 30 day terms invoice. Our view is that
our invoice was never validly in dispute anyway, and should have been
paid within terms.

What is the law on things like this?
I believe your view is correct.

The legislation can be found in the Late Payment of Commercial Debts
(interest) Act 1998
<http://www.hmso.gov.uk/acts/acts1998/19980020.htm> and subsequent
amendments, the latest of which (I think) is the Late Payment of
Commercial Debts Regulations 2002
<http://www.hmso.gov.uk/si/si2002/20021674.htm>

I can't find anything in that to suggest that the clock should be
reset where a debt is disputed.
 
A

Alex Heney

Are there any laws covering disputed invoices?

Specifically, if someone disputes an invoice, and some time later the
dispute is resolved such that they were wrong (i.e. the invoice was
valid and correct all along), is there any reason not to charge late
payment penalties if they apply?

This has only come up because a customer had a dispute where they
received a bill from us and from BT for the same thing. The BT invoice
was wrong, and we told them that when they asked us. They, however,
considered all of the bills, from us and BT to be "in dispute" and did
not pay them until the matter was resolved (by BT sending a credit
note). This took two months on a 30 day terms invoice. Our view is that
our invoice was never validly in dispute anyway, and should have been
paid within terms.

What is the law on things like this?
What I forget was that the law only applies to *commercial* debts.
Which means that if your customer was not acting in the course of
business, the legislation regarding late payment of debts does not
apply.
 
R

Rev Adrian Kennard

Alex said:
What I forget was that the law only applies to *commercial* debts.
Which means that if your customer was not acting in the course of
business, the legislation regarding late payment of debts does not
apply.
Of course... This we know <-:
 
A

Alex Heney

yellow mustard
1 cup seasoned flour
oil enough for deep frying
1 loaf French bread
Lettuce
tomatoes
mayonnaise, etc.

Marinate the fetuses in the egg-mustard mixture.
Dredge thoroughly in flour.
Fry at 375° until crispy golden brown.
Remove and place on paper towels.



Holiday Youngster

One can easily adapt this recipe to ham, though as presented,
it violates no religious taboos against swine.

1 large toddler or small child, cleaned and de-headed
Kentucky Bourbon Sauce (see index)
1 large can pineapple slices
Whole cloves

Place him (or ham) or her in a large glass baking dish, buttocks up.
Tie with butcher string around and across so that he looks like
he?s crawling.
Glaze, then arrange pineapples and secure with cloves.
Bake uncovered in 350° oven till thermometer reaches 160°.



Cajun Babies

Just like crabs or crawfish, babies are boiled alive!
You don?t need silverware, the hot spicy meat comes off in your hands.

6 live babies
1 lb. smoked sausage
4 lemons
whole garlic
2 lb. new potatoes
4 ears corn
1 box salt
crab boil

Bring 3 gallons of water to a boil.
Add sausage, salt, crab boil, lemons and garlic.
Drop potatoes in, boil for 4 minutes.
Corn i
 
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R

Rev Adrian Kennard

onions and seasoning then mix well.
Add just enough water for a smooth consistency, then mix again.
Form the sausage mixture into patties or stuff into natural casings.



Stillborn Stew

By definition, this meat cannot be had altogether fresh,
but have the lifeless unfortunate available immediately after delivery,
or use high quality beef or pork roasts (it is cheaper and better to
cut up a whole roast than to buy stew meat).

1 stillbirth, de-boned and cubed
¼ cup vegetable oil
2 large onions
bell pepper
celery
garlic
½ cup red wine
3 Irish potatoes
2 large carrots

This is a simple classic stew that makes natural gravy,
thus it does not have to be thickened.
Brown the meat quickly in very hot oil, remove and set aside.
Brown the onions, celery, pepper and garlic.
De-glaze with wine, return meat to the pan and season well.
Stew on low fire adding small amounts of water and
seasoning as necessary.
After at least half an hour, add the carrots and potatoes,
and simmer till root vegetables break with a fork.
Cook a fresh pot of long grained white rice.



Pre-mie Pot Pie

When working with prematurely delivered newborns (or chicken) use sherry;
red wine with beef (buy steak or roast, do not pre-boil).

Pie crust (see index)
Whole fresh pre-mie; eviscerated, head, hands and feet removed
Onions, bell pepper, celery
½ cup wine
Root vegetables of choice (turnips, carrots, potatoes, etc) cubed

Make a crust from scratch - or go shamefully to the frozen food section
of your favorite grocery and select 2 high quality pie crusts (you
will need one for the top also).
Boil the prepared delicacy until the meat starts to come off the bones.
Remove, de-bone and cube; continue to reduce the broth.
Brown the onions, peppers and celery.
Add the meat then season, continue browning.
De-glaze with
 
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A

Alex Heney

the meat back into the wok and adjust the seasoning.
De-glaze with sherry, cooking off the alcohol.
Add broth (optional) cook a few more minutes.
Add the cornstarch, cook a few minutes till thick,
then place the stuffing into a colander and cool;
2 hours
Wrap the rolls:
Place 3 tablespoons of stuffing in the wrap, roll tightly -
corner nearest you first, fold 2 side corners in,
wrap till remaining corner is left.
Brush with egg, seal, and allow to sit on the seal for
a few minutes.
Fry the rolls:
325° if using egg roll wraps, 350° for spring roll wraps.
Deep fry in peanut oil till crispy golden brown, drain on paper towels.



Lemon Neonate

Turkey serves just as well, and in fact even looks a bit like a
well-dressed baby. By the time you turn the child?s breast into
cutlets, it will be indistinguishable. The taste of young human,
although similar to turkey (and chicken) often can be wildly
different depending upon what he or she has consumed during its
10 to 14 months of life...

4 well chosen cutlets (from the breasts of 2 healthy neonates)
2 large lemons (fresh lemons always, if possible)
Olive oil
Green onions
Salt
pepper
cornstarch
neonate stock (chicken, or turkey stock is fine)
garlic
parsley
fresh cracked black pepper

Season and sauté the cutlets in olive oil till g
 

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