Do I need to file a NJ & NY return?


P

patj

I work in New York City and live in New Jersey. My company
also has a office in New Jersey. I normally pay New Jersey
taxes. This year for 1 paycheck the company messed up and
took out New York taxes instead of New Jersey. When I
noticed this I pointed out the error and the next pay period
I received a check refunding the additional amount that was
taken out for New York taxes along with my normal "This is
not a Check direct deposit slip". I only received 1 New
Jersey W2 from my company. Is this correct or do I have to
file a New York state tax return also?
 
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D

David Woods, EA, ChFC, CLU

I work in New York City and live in New Jersey. My company
also has a office in New Jersey. I normally pay New Jersey
taxes. This year for 1 paycheck the company messed up and
took out New York taxes instead of New Jersey. When I
noticed this I pointed out the error and the next pay period
I received a check refunding the additional amount that was
taken out for New York taxes along with my normal "This is
not a Check direct deposit slip". I only received 1 New
Jersey W2 from my company. Is this correct or do I have to
file a New York state tax return also?
You work in NY, you file in NY.
 
D

Dannie

I work in New York City and live in New Jersey. My company
also has a office in New Jersey. I normally pay New Jersey
taxes. This year for 1 paycheck the company messed up and
took out New York taxes instead of New Jersey. When I
noticed this I pointed out the error and the next pay period
I received a check refunding the additional amount that was
taken out for New York taxes along with my normal "This is
not a Check direct deposit slip". I only received 1 New
Jersey W2 from my company. Is this correct or do I have to
file a New York state tax return also?
If your employer gave you a W2 which only shows wages for NJ
and no mention of NY, I'd say you are a NJ resident and your
wages (mistake corrected) so it's only NJ resident return.

Dannie
 
T

Thomas Healy

I work in New York City and live in New Jersey. My company
also has a office in New Jersey. I normally pay New Jersey
taxes. This year for 1 paycheck the company messed up and
took out New York taxes instead of New Jersey. When I
noticed this I pointed out the error and the next pay period
I received a check refunding the additional amount that was
taken out for New York taxes along with my normal "This is
not a Check direct deposit slip". I only received 1 New
Jersey W2 from my company. Is this correct or do I have to
file a New York state tax return also?
The income you earn in NYC is subject to NYC and NY taxes.
You need to file a NY nonresident tax return. The company
should be withholding NY and NYC taxes so you don't end up
with a penalty for underpayment.
 
S

Seth Breidbart

I work in New York City and live in New Jersey.
Then you have to pay New York taxes. To the extent they're
no higher than the New Jersey taxes on that income, they're
a credit against your New Jersey taxes.

Seth
 
A

A.G. Kalman

I work in New York City and live in New Jersey. My company
also has a office in New Jersey. I normally pay New Jersey
taxes. This year for 1 paycheck the company messed up and
took out New York taxes instead of New Jersey. When I
noticed this I pointed out the error and the next pay period
I received a check refunding the additional amount that was
taken out for New York taxes along with my normal "This is
not a Check direct deposit slip". I only received 1 New
Jersey W2 from my company. Is this correct or do I have to
file a New York state tax return also?
You work in NY state, you owe NY income tax on your
earnings. If no NY state taxes were withheld from your pay,
you MAY owe NY estimated tax penalties. As far as I know NY
& NJ do not have any reciprocal income tax agreements.
Therefore, your employer should be withholding NY income
tax, not NJ income tax from your pay. You file a nonresident
NY return and a resident NJ tax. NJ will allow you a tax
credit for income taxes you pay NY on the same income that
NJ will tax as a resident of the state.

As a resident of NJ, you are not subject to NY City income
taxes.
 
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S

Seth Breidbart

If your employer gave you a W2 which only shows wages for NJ
and no mention of NY, I'd say you are a NJ resident and your
wages (mistake corrected) so it's only NJ resident return.
If he works in NYC, he has to pay taxes to NY. The fact
that his employer made some mistakes in its paperwork
doesn't obviate that.

Seth
 

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