Egg keep blocking my card 'for my protection'


L

Lobster

I have an Egg credit card which I use exclusively for online purchases,
including ebay; the idea being that I scrutinise my Egg statements
extra-carefully due to the perceived(?) increased likelihood of
fraudulent use (not that that's ever happened to me).

However, I'm finding inreasingly that Egg are blocking my card because
their software systems are flagging up potentially fraudulent activity
on my card; I have to ring up and personally authorise the queried
transaction before they'll unblock the card again. Happened twice this
month alone.

It was particularly irritating last time as they queried three or four
transactions of a few quid each; two IIRC were variable direct debits
and because, being away from home, I was unable to remember or look up
specific details of possible payees, I couldn't confirm 100% that they
were kosher transactions - the rub being that I was told that if I took
the chance and said they were OK, then I would be liable for any
subsequently arising fraudulent use on the card. Naturally I couldn't
risk that, so was without the card for a week until I got home.

Anyway - whinge over - I am interested in knowing whether other credit
card companies behave similarly with these types of 'risky'
transactions, or whether Egg are more anal than others? I certainly
feel like closing the Egg account, but won't bother doing so if any
other replacememt card will give me the same problems.

Thanks
David
 
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J

John

I have an Egg credit card which I use exclusively for online purchases,
including ebay; the idea being that I scrutinise my Egg statements
extra-carefully due to the perceived(?) increased likelihood of
fraudulent use (not that that's ever happened to me).

However, I'm finding inreasingly that Egg are blocking my card because
their software systems are flagging up potentially fraudulent activity
on my card; I have to ring up and personally authorise the queried
transaction before they'll unblock the card again. Happened twice this
month alone.

It was particularly irritating last time as they queried three or four
transactions of a few quid each; two IIRC were variable direct debits
and because, being away from home, I was unable to remember or look up
specific details of possible payees, I couldn't confirm 100% that they
were kosher transactions - the rub being that I was told that if I took
the chance and said they were OK, then I would be liable for any
subsequently arising fraudulent use on the card. Naturally I couldn't
risk that, so was without the card for a week until I got home.

Anyway - whinge over - I am interested in knowing whether other credit
card companies behave similarly with these types of 'risky'
transactions, or whether Egg are more anal than others? I certainly
feel like closing the Egg account, but won't bother doing so if any
other replacememt card will give me the same problems.

Thanks
David
I have had one or two credit cards that blocked transactions
especially those from abroad in foreign currency, eg buying stuff from
ebay in the US. I ditched those credit cards.

I have had other credit cards were I thought that the credit card
company was at fault for declining a transaction, but when I actually
phoned them up, they had confirmed that they hadn't declined anything,
it was in fact the processing company in the US (or elsewhere) where
the transaction had failed.

Usually I find that the problem here is that the address details do
not match exactly. For example the processing company in the US (not
usually the company you are buying goods or services from) may include
the name of the county you live in, or even the local area and this
has failed the transaction. When they have removed this though, so
that it just has the first line of your address, your post code and
your city or town, then the transaction has gone through okay.

In your case it does sound like you have a credit card company that is
a bit 'anal'.

John
 
C

Colin Forrester

Lobster said:
Anyway - whinge over - I am interested in knowing whether other credit
card companies behave similarly with these types of 'risky'
transactions, or whether Egg are more anal than others?
Girobank Visa and Barclaycard Visa do this to me regularly.
 
N

NTL News Server

Lobster said:
I have an Egg credit card which I use exclusively for online
purchases, including ebay; the idea being that I scrutinise my Egg
statements extra-carefully due to the perceived(?) increased
likelihood of fraudulent use (not that that's ever happened to me).

However, I'm finding inreasingly that Egg are blocking my card because
their software systems are flagging up potentially fraudulent activity
on my card; I have to ring up and personally authorise the queried
transaction before they'll unblock the card again. Happened twice
this month alone.

It was particularly irritating last time as they queried three or four
transactions of a few quid each; two IIRC were variable direct debits
and because, being away from home, I was unable to remember or look up
specific details of possible payees, I couldn't confirm 100% that they
were kosher transactions - the rub being that I was told that if I
took the chance and said they were OK, then I would be liable for any
subsequently arising fraudulent use on the card. Naturally I couldn't
risk that, so was without the card for a week until I got home.

Anyway - whinge over - I am interested in knowing whether other credit
card companies behave similarly with these types of 'risky'
transactions, or whether Egg are more anal than others? I certainly
feel like closing the Egg account, but won't bother doing so if any
other replacememt card will give me the same problems.
Just before Xmas last year my wife used our Goldfish card to top up her
mobile phone. As a result of this "suspicious" activity, the card was then
referred three times while she was doing her Christmas shopping. That's
effecively the same as declining the transaction, as till operators aren't
going to sit there on the end of a phone for ages trying to get through to
the authorisation centre. When I complained by phone, I was told that they
had been trying to contact me, but couldn't get through - apparently because
we had anonymous call barring enabled at the time. Of course it didn't occur
to them to email me to ask me to get in touch with them.

I understand that some issuers only allow a certain number of transactions a
day (Nationwide?), and decline any extra ones.

So no, it's not rare to have these problems. Given the amount of fraud, you
can't really blame them for putting in "fraud detection" software.
Unfortunately like most software of this type (anti spam software springs to
mind) it doesn't always get it right. I recall the case of somebody who
tried to buy a wedding ring with his Amex card. It was declined as it
constituted an "unusual spending pattern".
 
N

Nebulous

Lobster said:
I have an Egg credit card which I use exclusively for online purchases,
including ebay; the idea being that I scrutinise my Egg statements
extra-carefully due to the perceived(?) increased likelihood of
fraudulent use (not that that's ever happened to me).

However, I'm finding inreasingly that Egg are blocking my card because
their software systems are flagging up potentially fraudulent activity
on my card; I have to ring up and personally authorise the queried
transaction before they'll unblock the card again. Happened twice this
month alone.
I quite like Egg being proactive about security. I rarely use my Egg card <
£100 per month and sometimes nil. In mid October I bought a satellite
navigation system seventy miles from my home. The transaction went through
ok. On the way out of the shop my mobile phone rang with an automated
message to check the transaction was genuine.

Some four weeks later I travelled hundreds of miles and made about 5 £100+
transactions. In one case I made two such transactions in the same shop. On
calling home my wife said Egg had been trying to contact me at home. I then
received another phonecall and the same automated process to approve my
purchases.

It didn't disrupt my shopping, but made me feel they were being careful
about transactions well outside my normal pattern.

Neb
 
R

Ronald Raygun

NTL said:
When I complained by phone, I was told that they
had been trying to contact me, but couldn't get through - apparently
because we had anonymous call barring enabled at the time. Of course it
didn't occur to them to email me to ask me to get in touch with them.
Or to call non-anonymously, for that matter.
 
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F

Flop

Ronald said:
NTL News Server wrote:




Or to call non-anonymously, for that matter.
Goldfish 'did' me this Christmas.

I think my 'unusual transactions' must have been the weekly trip to Tescos.

They could not contact me either. However, I think that you are mistaken
in assuming that they used the phone. Probably psychic communication -
as it is cheaper.
My telephone stores the last 50 calls in. None of these is unaccounted for.

My conclusion is that they play 'eenie-meenie-miney-mo' and mess up
Christmas.

You can always call them though.

It does mean going through multiple 'pick a number' layers - one of
which is to enter your card number.

When a voice speaks, they are very pleasant and helpful - even if they
ask you for your card number - having waited for you to put the card
away first.

Anyway, enjoy 2006.

flop
 
T

Tumbleweed

Lobster said:
I have an Egg credit card which I use exclusively for online purchases,
including ebay; the idea being that I scrutinise my Egg statements
extra-carefully due to the perceived(?) increased likelihood of fraudulent
use (not that that's ever happened to me).
I use Marbles for the same purpose, never had any problems with them.
Had several cases of fraud on credit cards I havent used on the net.
So perhaps you should be checking your *other* cards more carefully :)
 
P

Poldie

NTL said:
Just before Xmas last year my wife used our Goldfish card to top up her
mobile phone. As a result of this "suspicious" activity, the card was then
referred three times while she was doing her Christmas shopping. That's
effecively the same as declining the transaction, as till operators aren't
going to sit there on the end of a phone for ages trying to get through to
the authorisation centre.
In which shop have you had `online referral` treated as a `decline`,
and did you ask to speak to the manager?
 
P

Poldie

Tumbleweed said:
I use Marbles for the same purpose, never had any problems with them.
Had several cases of fraud on credit cards I havent used on the net.
So perhaps you should be checking your *other* cards more carefully :)
Cahoot offer a handy `webcard` thingy which gives you a one-time credit
card number - I'm suprised more banks don't do this.
 
T

Tim

Cahoot offer a handy `webcard` thingy which gives you a one-time
credit card number - I'm suprised more banks don't do this.
Agreed.

And you can "drag-and-drop" from their software's window to your browser,
removing any possibility of entering the cc number incorrectly, or the CVV,
or the required spelling of your name....

All good stuff!
 
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M

Mark BR

Tim said:
BUT don't use it to buy an airline ticket online. Most (all??) airlines
require sight of the actual credit card when you try to board, and of course
you don't have one with the 'correct' number.

Mark BR
 
C

Colin Forrester

Mark said:
BUT don't use it to buy an airline ticket online. Most (all??) airlines
require sight of the actual credit card when you try to board, and of course
you don't have one with the 'correct' number.
This is what most airlines tell you - but I have never been asked to
produce my payment card - ever. The only place it was a slight
inconvenience was getting a cinema ticket and Eurostar - where the self
service ticket machines needed to read the payment card.
 
S

s_pickle2001

Colin said:
This is what most airlines tell you - but I have never been asked to
produce my payment card - ever. The only place it was a slight
inconvenience was getting a cinema ticket and Eurostar - where the self
service ticket machines needed to read the payment card.
A *few* airlines. When I last booked a ticket online, I was given a
list of about three that wanted to see the card at check-in, and I was
indeed asked for my card when I travelled on one of them. I don't know
what happens if you don't have the card with you, for example, because
it is lost ot stolen, or you simply got a replacement card with a
different number as happens with Nationwide debit cards.
 
S

s_pickle2001

Mark said:
BUT don't use it to buy an airline ticket online. Most (all??) airlines
require sight of the actual credit card when you try to board, and of course
you don't have one with the 'correct' number.

Mark BR
There is another issue. I don't remember where I read it, possibly
here, that somebody had a hard time explaining the concept of the
webcard in Thailand when he wanted to get his plane ticket refunded.
 
R

Ronald Raygun

A *few* airlines. When I last booked a ticket online, I was given a
list of about three that wanted to see the card at check-in, and I was
indeed asked for my card when I travelled on one of them. I don't know
what happens if you don't have the card with you, for example, because
it is lost ot stolen, or you simply got a replacement card with a
different number as happens with Nationwide debit cards.
What if you're travelling on a ticket bought for you by someone else
with their card, and who's not accompanying you?
 
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M

Mark BR

Ronald Raygun said:
What if you're travelling on a ticket bought for you by someone else
with their card, and who's not accompanying you?
When booking it is pointed out that you can't.

Mark BR
 
M

Mark BR

There is another issue. I don't remember where I read it, possibly
here, that somebody had a hard time explaining the concept of the
webcard in Thailand when he wanted to get his plane ticket refunded.
Also Thailand at least one person I know has been bounce (by Cathy Pacific)
when they could not produce the card used for the booking.

Mark BR
 
C

Chris Blunt

There is another issue. I don't remember where I read it, possibly
here, that somebody had a hard time explaining the concept of the
webcard in Thailand when he wanted to get his plane ticket refunded.
That would have been me.

Thai Airways asked to see my credit card when I tried to check-in for
one of their flights a few weeks ago. I'd purchased the e-ticket with
a Cahoot webcard and had to buy another ticket to get on the flight.

After that things just got worse. Their ticket office refused to
process the refund for the old ticket unless I could produce the
credit card used to purchase it with. I still haven't worked out how
I'm going to get my money back from them.

Chris
 
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M

Mike Williams

What if you're travelling on a ticket bought for you by someone else
When booking it is pointed out that you can't.

Mark BR
Several times I have bought tickets for my wife, children and not travelled
myself. Both on internal (UK) flights and overseas. Has never been a
problem.

MikeW
 
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