Electrical plugs in the EU


D

David Bloom

When traveling through the EU how many electrical plugs is one
likely to run into, and is the electric current stable in the EU.
So that a laptop computer adapter wont go bonkers, and clocks
keep various times.
 
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A

arachedeux

David Bloom said:
When traveling through the EU how many electrical plugs is one
likely to run into, and is the electric current stable in the EU.
So that a laptop computer adapter wont go bonkers, and clocks
keep various times.
In my experience the wiring in DE, NE, BE, LUX, & SUI is the best in Europe,
you'll find locals using their laptops while they're in the bath becuase of
the inbuilt earthing system.
cheers,
 
E

Enzo Michelangeli

David Bloom said:
When traveling through the EU how many electrical plugs is one
likely to run into,
See: http://kropla.com/electric2.htm
and is the electric current stable in the EU.
Of course not: you see, power generation plants in Europe are ox-powered,
and sometimes the poor beasts run out of hay :-b
So that a laptop computer adapter wont go bonkers, and clocks
keep various times.
Most laptop computers have universal AC adapters (autoswitching in the
range 100 - 240Vac) so this shouldn't be a concern. Anyway, as far as I
know all European countries use 220/230 Vac - 50 Hz power supply.

Enzo
 
D

David Bloom

arachedeux said:
In my experience the wiring in DE, NE, BE, LUX, & SUI is the best in Europe,
you'll find locals using their laptops while they're in the bath becuase of
the inbuilt earthing system.
cheers,
220 volts AC in the bath tub, are they nuts (!) ? 110 volts may
tickle a bit, but I would not want to test what 220 volts would do.
The real question is, are most plugs the two round holed 220
volt 50 cycles plugs?
 
E

Enzo Michelangeli

[...]
220 volts AC in the bath tub, are they nuts (!) ? 110 volts may
tickle a bit, but I would not want to test what 220 volts would do.
It's done intentionally, in order to remove dumb people from the gene
pool, reduce the overall cost of pensions, and create jobs for the
undertakers.
The real question is, are most plugs the two round holed 220
volt 50 cycles plugs?
It depends, and even in those the size of the pins varies as well as the
distance between them. And sometimes you have a central ground pin,
sometimes you don't. Welcome to the common market :)

Enzo
 
P

Paul Schmitz-Josten

This is really nuts, especially when using an adaptor which might not
include the earthing connector!

(different electrical plugs in the EU)
The real question is, are most plugs the two round holed 220
volt 50 cycles plugs?
There are different diameters of the plugs and different arrangements of
the (optional) earthing connector. See some examples here:
http://www.softguide.de/prog_j/pj_0667.htm

I suggest that you look for a multinational connector at home. The
international airport of your country will be the last of your best chances
to get one which fits to your equipment.

For Germany, there is an example at www.conrad.de named "Euro-Star":
http://www1.conrad.de/scripts/wgate...guid=&master_typ=&page=1&p_sortopt=desc+zsort

This one costs 10 Euro and will fit for the "Euro" type of connector only
which is used in Germany and some other european states.

Regarding the current it will be the best to assume 220 VAC and ask locals
in the different countries for deviations.


Attention if you want to use a modem:
There are different types of telephone plugs, too! I know at least about
the (different) national connectors of Germany and Austria. Fortunately,
most modern telephones have the "western" type of plug. Therefore the
telephone cable can frequently be used for modem connections.

Ciao,

Paul
 
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3

3573 bytes free

In my experience the wiring in DE, NE, BE, LUX, & SUI is the best in Europe,
you'll find locals using their laptops while they're in the bath becuase of
the inbuilt earthing system.
The risk may be low because the transformer is external to the laptop.
Even if my house has differential switches (which are obligatory in Italy
and much better than some huge fuses I've seen in german residential
blocks) there is always the chance it breaks up, so i wouldn't risk taking
electrical equipment to the bathroom. Use a magazine. And test your
differential switches once a year.

--
"Che abbia voce o no, il popolo puo' essere sempre portato al volere dei
capi. È facile. Tutto quello che dovete fare e' dir loro che sono attaccati,
e denunciare i pacifisti per mancanza di patriottismo e in quanto espongono
il paese al pericolo. Funziona allo stesso modo in tutti i paesi."
(Hermann Goering) <<< Sig. heil!
 
T

Tim

... 110 volts may tickle a bit, but I would
not want to test what 220 volts would do.
It's not just the voltage that matters, it is the current as well.

While a few amps would not be too good through a human body at a couple of
hundred volts, it is certainly possible to send **several thousand volts**
through the body with no ill-effects if the current is measured in fractions
of a milliamp. In my wild days, many years ago as a schoolchild in the
science lab, I once passed around 10,000 volts through me with not even a
tickle....
 
F

filippo

*apologies for X-posting

David said:
220 volts AC in the bath tub, are they nuts (!) ? 110 volts may
tickle a bit, but I would not want to test what 220 volts would do.
The real question is, are most plugs the two round holed 220
volt 50 cycles plugs?

If your concern is electrocution in the bath, then stay assured that
110 volts is plenty to get killed, if you happen to provide a good bridge
from the live wire to earth (not to say if you touch the neutral too...).
You are right anyway: 220V is way too high for most purposes.
Actually, tension is more likely to be found in the 240V range (in Europe),
as triphase is more likely to be set at 400V rather than 380V.
No matter what the exact figures are, however, _nominal_ electrical tension
is one and the same across EU.
Ah yes, frequency is 50 Hz, not 60.
German type electrical plugs are probably the easiest to find
outside of their own country, and are a very common
standard, even because lots of domestic appliances (whose brand
is German) are fitted with them by default, although I find the British
ones safer: being asymmetrical, they keep you from randomly swapping live
and neutral; from, even deliberately, shunting the earth with your fingers,
unlike the German external earth cage; and, mostly important, they are
fused.
As far as stability is concerned, I can quote the specifications
ENEL (the Italian provider) gives for its power delivery: plus or
minus 10%, which is a huge ripple for most "sensitive" appliances.
The power adapter of your laptop should act as buffer, though.
 
S

Steve Maudsley

Tim said:
It's not just the voltage that matters, it is the current as well.

While a few amps would not be too good through a human body at a couple of
hundred volts, it is certainly possible to send **several thousand volts**
through the body with no ill-effects if the current is measured in fractions
of a milliamp. In my wild days, many years ago as a schoolchild in the
science lab, I once passed around 10,000 volts through me with not even a
tickle....
You can develop 5000 volts on a nylon carpet

Stephen
 
E

Evpuneq Erivf

The risk may be low because the transformer is external to the laptop.
Even if my house has differential switches (which are obligatory in Italy
and much better than some huge fuses I've seen in german residential
blocks) there is always the chance it breaks up, so i wouldn't risk taking
electrical equipment to the bathroom. Use a magazine. And test your
differential switches once a year.
Even if you have a PDA that probably can't deliver a fatal dose (and
remember it's amps that kill you, more than about 50mA is fatal - you can
draw more than 10A from the mains supply) - the thought of dropping nearly
a thousand quids worth of electronics in the bath or ruining it in high
humidity sucks pretty badly.
 
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M

Michele Dall'Agata

In
David Bloom said:
When traveling through the EU how many electrical plugs is one
likely to run into,
Just buy an American to Italian plug converter with two pins. You can plug
it in most of the European countries (even in UK and Ireland. But you need
to put a key to switch the block in the plug in the top).
and is the electric current stable in the EU.So that a laptop computer
adapter wont go bonkers, and clocks
keep various times.
No, it takes some siesta a couple of hours per day, especially in Italy and
Spain.

What a question...

Ciao,
Michele
 
P

Pete

When traveling through the EU how many electrical plugs is one
likely to run into, and is the electric current stable in the EU.
So that a laptop computer adapter wont go bonkers, and clocks
keep various times.
Ok, I'll start, I have just counted and I have 57 in my house here
in the UK. I don't think everyone reads newsgroups so I doubt you'll
be able to get an exact figure

:)

Pete
 
A

ADPUF

If your concern is electrocution in the bath, then stay
assured that 110 volts is plenty to get killed, if you
happen to provide a good bridge from the live wire to
earth (not to say if you touch the neutral too...). You
are right anyway: 220V is way too high for most purposes.
Actually, tension is more likely to be found in the 240V
range (in Europe), as triphase is more likely to be set at
400V rather than 380V. No matter what the exact figures
are, however, _nominal_ electrical tension is one and the
same across EU. Ah yes, frequency is 50 Hz, not 60.

230 V, 50 Hz, ~
 
P

Peter Wenz

Pete said:
Ok, I'll start, I have just counted and I have 57 in my house here
in the UK.
And in your other houses? *g*
I don't think everyone reads newsgroups so I doubt you'll
be able to get an exact figure
I would like to state the electric current being quiet stable compared
to New York last year. With the exception of Italy.

In Italien sorgt halt Berlusconi für Spannung.

Cheers
Peter
 
D

David Bloom

Enzo said:
[...]
220 volts AC in the bath tub, are they nuts (!) ? 110 volts may
tickle a bit, but I would not want to test what 220 volts would do.
It's done intentionally, in order to remove dumb people from the gene
pool, reduce the overall cost of pensions, and create jobs for the
undertakers.
ROTFLMAO Thanks
It depends, and even in those the size of the pins varies as well as the
distance between them. And sometimes you have a central ground pin,
sometimes you don't. Welcome to the common market :)
Then I hope they still have Radio Shacks, whoops they were
called Tandy over there, I think.
 
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D

David Bloom

Paul said:
This is really nuts, especially when using an adaptor which might not
include the earthing connector!

(different electrical plugs in the EU)

There are different diameters of the plugs and different arrangements of
the (optional) earthing connector. See some examples here:
http://www.softguide.de/prog_j/pj_0667.htm
Well I got a bag of adapters with the step down converter I
guess I better bring them all. (!)
I suggest that you look for a multinational connector at home. The
international airport of your country will be the last of your best chances
to get one which fits to your equipment.

For Germany, there is an example at www.conrad.de named "Euro-Star":
http://www1.conrad.de/scripts/wgate...r_guid=&master_typ=&page=1&p_sortopt=desc+zso
This one costs 10 Euro and will fit for the "Euro" type of connector only
which is used in Germany and some other european states.

Regarding the current it will be the best to assume 220 VAC and ask locals
in the different countries for deviations.

Attention if you want to use a modem:
There are different types of telephone plugs, too!
Great !
Do they have different tones that a US modem will not connect to?
 
D

David Bloom

Enzo said:
See: http://kropla.com/electric2.htm


Of course not: you see, power generation plants in Europe are ox-powered,
and sometimes the poor beasts run out of hay :-b
Yeah, that's what I heard too? :)
Most laptop computers have universal AC adapters (autoswitching in the
range 100 - 240Vac) so this shouldn't be a concern. Anyway, as far as I
know all European countries use 220/230 Vac - 50 Hz power supply.
One hopes, those darn oxen are pretty stubborn at times. :)
 
D

David Bloom

Michele said:
In

Just buy an American to Italian plug converter with two pins. You can plug
it in most of the European countries (even in UK and Ireland. But you need
to put a key to switch the block in the plug in the top).

adapter wont go bonkers, and clocks

No, it takes some siesta a couple of hours per day, especially in Italy and
Spain.

What a question...
Well yeah, but I took a US digital clock for 60 Hz and it ran slow
and when I used my 60 Hz hair clipper it was very loud and varied
a lot. It sounded like a race car on its last legs.
 
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D

David Bloom

3573 said:
The risk may be low because the transformer is external to the laptop.
Even if my house has differential switches (which are obligatory in Italy
and much better than some huge fuses I've seen in german residential
blocks) there is always the chance it breaks up, so i wouldn't risk taking
electrical equipment to the bathroom. Use a magazine. And test your
differential switches once a year.
Well if you are a teenager and only testing your differential switches
once a year by using a magazine, there is probably something wrong
with you. :)
 

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