Experience of compiling HIP (home information pack)?


L

Lobster

Has anyone any experience of preparing a home information pack (HIP) for
selling a property?

I need to do so soon and am considering compiling my own, if it's
straightforward and will save some dosh. I've seen some info about this
on http://www.homeinformationpacks.gov.uk but would like to hear about
the practicalities/costs.

ISTR figures of about £600 were being bandied about as 'average' amounts
- is that about right and how does that divvy up? Eg, presumably I'd
still have to pay for the energy efficiency report etc...

Thanks
David
 
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T

tim.....

Lobster said:
Has anyone any experience of preparing a home information pack (HIP) for
selling a property?

I need to do so soon and am considering compiling my own, if it's
straightforward and will save some dosh. I've seen some info about this
on http://www.homeinformationpacks.gov.uk but would like to hear about the
practicalities/costs.

ISTR figures of about £600 were being bandied about as 'average' amounts -
is that about right and how does that divvy up? Eg, presumably I'd still
have to pay for the energy efficiency report etc...
This will include the energy report (perhaps 100 pounds)
the council search which previously the buyer would
have paid for, this can be anything from 1-200 pounds
and you'll need a copy of the draft contract which you
would have had to have paid your solicitor for anyway.


tim
 
S

Stickems.

A HIP has a limited life, I think 3 months. I wouldn't pay £600 as there is
no guarantee the house would sell within that time scale, as will be the
case, increasingly, as the market slows down. Why not say to the estate
agent that if he finds a buyer who wants a HIP then he should get one at his
expense.


| Has anyone any experience of preparing a home information pack (HIP) for
| selling a property?
|
| I need to do so soon and am considering compiling my own, if it's
| straightforward and will save some dosh. I've seen some info about this
| on http://www.homeinformationpacks.gov.uk but would like to hear about
| the practicalities/costs.
|
| ISTR figures of about £600 were being bandied about as 'average' amounts
| - is that about right and how does that divvy up? Eg, presumably I'd
| still have to pay for the energy efficiency report etc...
|
| Thanks
| David
 
M

Mouse

A HIP has a limited life, I think 3 months. I wouldn't pay £600 as there is
no guarantee the house would sell within that time scale, as will be the
case, increasingly, as the market slows down. Why not say to the estate
agent that if he finds a buyer who wants a HIP then he should get one at his
expense.
Sorry, that wouldn't work. If your property has 3 bedrooms or more
(and is in England & Wales, etc) you can't put the property on the
market without either actually having a HIP (or in certain
circumstances having requested one).

See http://www.homeinformationpacks.gov.uk/consumer/.

Mouse.
 
T

tim.....

A HIP has a limited life, I think 3 months. I wouldn't pay £600 as there
is
no guarantee the house would sell within that time scale, as will be the
case, increasingly, as the market slows down. Why not say to the estate
agent that if he finds a buyer who wants a HIP then he should get one at
his
expense.
Sorry, that wouldn't work. If your property has 3 bedrooms or more
(and is in England & Wales, etc) you can't put the property on the
market without either actually having a HIP (or in certain
circumstances having requested one).

See http://www.homeinformationpacks.gov.uk/consumer/.

-------------------------------------

to be precise you can, if you wish to take a chance
on getting caught.

tim
 
U

unopened

Sorry, that wouldn't work. If your property has 3 bedrooms or more
(and is in England & Wales, etc) you can't put the property on the
market without either actually having a HIP (or in certain
circumstances having requested one).

Seehttp://www.homeinformationpacks.gov.uk/consumer/.

-------------------------------------

to be precise you can, if you wish to take a chance
on getting caught.

tim
Hmm, what about properties with two bedrooms and an office? If a
bedroom is a room with a bed in it, then I'm living in a single
bedroom property currently - and it would be a zero bedroom property
if I hadn't borrowed a bed from a neighbour. The link given does not
shed light on this.

Sid
 
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C

Clifford Frisby

tim..... wrote:

and you'll need a copy of the draft contract which you
would have had to have paid your solicitor for anyway.


tim
I'm not sure what's being implied here.

If a HIP has to contain the draft contract, would one normally have to
involve a prospective solicitor in compiling the HIP?
 
L

Lobster

Hmm, what about properties with two bedrooms and an office? If a
bedroom is a room with a bed in it,
No that's not the criterion (or how would you define it for a completely
empty property?)

HMG's take on this, which is probably correct, is that why would someone
try to advertise and promote their property for sale with one bedroom
less than it really has, just to save a few hundred quid on a HIP, when
the potential losses on the sale price are far more than that. I mean,
I'm selling a 3-bedroomed property, and expect to get a price based on
that... if I choose to market it as a two-bedroom place then either I
will have to ask a much lower price, or put it on at a higher price and
hope that (a) buyers who want a 3-bedder will spot the 'subterfuge' and
go for it. But then there's the risk of missing lots of potential
buyers eg who just search Rightmove for 3 bedders...

(Still hoping to hear from anyone who's compiled their own HIP!)

David
 
M

me

Lobster said:
Has anyone any experience of preparing a home information pack (HIP)
for selling a property?

I need to do so soon and am considering compiling my own, if it's
straightforward and will save some dosh. I've seen some info about
this on http://www.homeinformationpacks.gov.uk but would like to hear
about the practicalities/costs.

ISTR figures of about £600 were being bandied about as 'average'
amounts - is that about right and how does that divvy up? Eg,
presumably I'd still have to pay for the energy efficiency report etc...
The price is more likely to be around £300 plus VAT for up-front
payment, alternatively some providers will let you defer payment for up
to about 10 months and then charge about £50 extra for the privilege.

Lawpack do offer a DIY hip-pack, but I would be surprised if you could
save much more than about £50 that way, as you will still need to pay
for searches, EPC etc, you will just be paying yourself for the time and
effort in compiling everything and taking on the risk that you cock it
up.
 
D

David Hansen

On Tue, 9 Oct 2007 13:46:24 +0100 someone who may be
me@privacy.net said:
Lawpack do offer a DIY hip-pack, but I would be surprised if you could
save much more than about £50 that way, as you will still need to pay
for searches, EPC etc,
The energy performance certificate is a pile of shite, dumbed down
to the level of a meaningless box ticking exercise. I certainly
wouldn't pay the sort of fool who works of a solicitor or estate
agent a penny for that sort of simplistic exercise unless forced to.
Neither would I be stupid enough to pay any attention to such a
dumbed down pile of shite if I was buying a house. I suppose its
most useful use would be to put in the compost bin.

On the other hand SAP, in its various forms, has enough detail to
almost be useful.

The fact that party politicians, who don't know their arse from
their elbow, insist on such things being done by the sort of fool
who works for a solicitor or estate agent isn't going to change my
mind. As with their other ridiculous ideas, for example the English
Part P of the Building Regulations, it simply confirms that we would
be better off getting rid of the party politicians, who are really
only the representatives of lawyers. I like William Morris' idea of
turning the Palace of Westminster into a store for manure. Most of
the party politicians would no doubt make reasonable compost.
 
I

Ian_m

My mate had one done (£500 odd) and mostly a waste of space.

Boiler was mis identified as being non condensing as it was not on the
inspectors list of known boliers, so negative on energy rating there.

Negative points for not having all thermostatic valve on all radiators
(hallway and bathroom). The boiler instructions state at least one radiator
must not have them to act as a bypass.

Misidentified the depth of insulation in the loft, said was 100mm, but was
actually considerably more.

Phoned up to complain and inspector said "OK" and just reissued the HIP with
one point higher energy rating, a B now instead of C (I think).

The buyers were not interested in the HIP at all, more interested in nice
new kitchen and off road parking.....

Mind you he added £1000 to price to cover the HIP costs.
 
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D

David Hansen

On Tue, 9 Oct 2007 16:18:38 +0100 someone who may be "Ian_m"
Negative points for not having all thermostatic valve on all radiators
(hallway and bathroom). The boiler instructions state at least one radiator
must not have them to act as a bypass.
And an installation with just thermostatic valves would fail a
number of other requirements of relatively recent years, including
ones to prevent the waste of fuel caused by short cycling of the
boiler.

Of course the sort of bod who works for a solicitor or estate agent
is not going to even be aware of such things, let alone understand
them.
 

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