EY or KPMG? Tax vs. Auditing?


C

ccyng

I am in such a big headache now. I got an offer from EY auditing and
KPMG tax, really hard to decide. Auditing, obviously seems a more
promising career (is this true?), but KPMG did offer a more attractive
comp. package. So what choice shall i pick?

auditing vs. tax?
EY vs. KPMG?

btw, I heard some rumor about KPMG. ppl around me don't like KPMG
 
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X

xyzer

ccyng said:
I am in such a big headache now. I got an offer from EY auditing and
KPMG tax, really hard to decide. Auditing, obviously seems a more
promising career (is this true?), but KPMG did offer a more attractive
comp. package. So what choice shall i pick?

auditing vs. tax?
EY vs. KPMG?

btw, I heard some rumor about KPMG. ppl around me don't like KPMG


As a side note, back in the day, at Coopers and Lybrand, before it
merged with PriceWaterhouse, you actually did both tax and audit to see
what you liked and what you were best at. You'd do one for a year or
so and then the other for a year, and then you'd begin to specialize in
one. This tradition also served to provide a basic, practical
experience with both areas. But, after the merger, that idea was
scrapped, so now you basically do have to choose between the two at
the Big 4 level.

Anyway, if it were I, I would choose audit based on it being more
interesting and based more on critical thinking and common sense vs
tax, where the balance is tipped more towards knowing a LOT of complex
rules. These rules come about through political processes, which seems
inherently unsatisfying to me -- not to say auditing rules don't have
political involvement -- obviously not the case, but the goal is
different for auditing rules. To me, this heavily political nature of
tax makes it somewhat boring, but others like being able to save money
for others period through learning and applying these complex political
rules.

On the other hand, tax due to its very nature as described above, is
more suspectible to being "mastered" than is audit. You will likely
always be on your heels either way, but probably moreso with audit (re:
slightly longer hours with audit in the Big 4). It's not as black and
white as tax for one thing, and you have to learn different industries
on a deeper level I think to do their audits than to do their taxes.
You will likely travel much more with audit than with tax.

You just need to weigh everything against your own preferences.
 

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