Home visit by IRS agent


C

CLJ1219

Anyone heard of this?

One of our clients, a gentleman who has been in business for
greater than 10 years and who has several businesses
throughout that time, received a home visit from an IRS
agent. The client nor his wife were at home at the time of
the visit. It might have been fortunate for the agent since
there had recently been a murder of two real estate agents
at a model home nearby and the wife is a real estate agent.
The home visit was prompted by, according to the agent, late
941s, 940 and a 1120S. The 940 was for 2002, the 941s were
for third and fourth quarter 2002 and the 1120S was for tax
year 2002 which was extended until September 15, 2003. The
man's home address is NOT the address for the business and
never has been and appears absolutely nowhere in connection
with the business. Also, his wife is not a shareholder of
the company and the agent said that it was strictly
employment and income tax related and not personal
tax-related.

The client called our office in a panic after his wife
returned home and found the business card from the IRS
agent. We had him come into our office the following
morning and he called the agent from there. He executed a
POA, which incidentially the agent never asked us to fax to
her. By the end of the short (7-10 minute) phone call, she
said that if he would mail to her a signed copy of the 940,
the fourth quarter 941 (she found the third quarter) and the
1120S that she would consider the case closed.

This somehow just does not FEEL right. Maybe it is the fact
that he never received any notices for those forms (he said
he didn't and none of us recalled seeing any). Maybe it was
the fact that the agent never did answer the direct question
of why she went to their house. Maybe it was the fact that
she spoke to my employer with the POA being faxed to her.
Maybe it was the "ease" with which there was a solution to
the problem. Maybe it was her lack of knowledge of how a S
corp is taxed. I don't know why but it just does not feel
right.

Any thoughts?

Carol

What can one expect of a day that begins with getting out of bed.
Semper Gumby (Always Flexible)
 
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T

TaxmanHog

CLJ1219 said:
Anyone heard of this?
Yes, I happens in cases where the business has dissolved
and the operations have ceased at the place of presence,
noted on the tax account or the business address is a
PO BOX, and no known Street address.

I spend a lot of time in the course of a year chasing down
dead horses (dormant & dissolved corporations), I usually
end up having to visit the residence of the officer(s).

It is not my first stop but is on my list of place to reach
the President & Treasurer, concerns about third party
contact drive the way in which initial & subsequent contact
attempts are made since RRA-98.
One of our clients, a gentleman who has been in business for
greater than 10 years and who has several businesses
throughout that time, received a home visit from an IRS
agent.
In cases where the entrepreneur has many tax entities, all
Doing business at the same locus, with the same old store
front name, but with distinctly different corporation/
partnership/sole prop names over the course of many years,
It can be risky to cause Inadvertent third party contact
-embarrassment-!, never mind nearly giving the non-responsible
wife a heart attack.

I have a case where the locus is a popularly know trade name,
but the operation has traded hands well over 10 times in the
past 10 years, all owners officers appear to be unrelated in
the string-sequence, at this point I have had to talk to the
current owner/operator who bought the business from some one
else, who bought from some one else. The issues at hand are
941 trust fund taxes, concern for locating the Responsible
Person is important in this case. so I am spending time
tracking down this person at his home.
The client nor his wife were at home at the time of
the visit. It might have been fortunate for the agent since
there had recently been a murder of two real estate agents
at a model home nearby and the wife is a real estate agent.
The home visit was prompted by, according to the agent, late
941s, 940 and a 1120S. The 940 was for 2002, the 941s were
for third and fourth quarter 2002 and the 1120S was for tax
year 2002 which was extended until September 15, 2003. The
man's home address is NOT the address for the business and
never has been and appears absolutely nowhere in connection
with the business. Also, his wife is not a shareholder of
the company and the agent said that it was strictly
employment and income tax related and not personal
tax-related.

The client called our office in a panic after his wife
returned home and found the business card from the IRS
agent. We had him come into our office the following
morning and he called the agent from there. He executed a
POA, which incidentally the agent never asked us to fax to
her. By the end of the short (7-10 minute) phone call, she
said that if he would mail to her a signed copy of the 940,
the fourth quarter 941 (she found the third quarter) and the
1120S that she would consider the case closed.

This somehow just does not FEEL right. Maybe it is the fact
that he never received any notices for those forms (he said
he didn't and none of us recalled seeing any). Maybe it was
the fact that the agent never did answer the direct question
of why she went to their house. Maybe it was the fact that
she spoke to my employer with the POA being faxed to her.
Maybe it was the "ease" with which there was a solution to
the problem.
Based on the --assumption-- that all the previous contact
attempts (master file mailings) to the address of record
were properly directed why did they not respond??, I have
seen instances of inadvertent address flipping, this occurs
when a taxpayer ceases operation misses the filing of a
particular return, later files a return which reflects new
place of presence (or the officers home address) and later
discovers an unfilled return due quarters or years ago, with
the pre-coded address information, when this return is posted
it causes the official address of record -flip- to the old
address, subsequent master file mailing go undeliverable, the
post office is not obligated to forward the mail when it gets
back to the service center no information is available to correct
the flip on the envelope, or the current business tenant circular
files the mailings.
Maybe it was her lack of knowledge of how a S corp is taxed.
I don't know why but it just does not feel right.
Are you stating that S-corps -never- have payroll (941 & 940)
liability for shareholders?, If the filing requirement was
turned on when the entity was created, then there is a need.
 
H

Harlan Lunsford

CLJ1219 said:
Anyone heard of this?

One of our clients, a gentleman who has been in business for
greater than 10 years and who has several businesses
throughout that time, received a home visit from an IRS
agent. The client nor his wife were at home at the time of
the visit. It might have been fortunate for the agent since
there had recently been a murder of two real estate agents
at a model home nearby and the wife is a real estate agent.
The home visit was prompted by, according to the agent, late
941s, 940 and a 1120S. The 940 was for 2002, the 941s were
for third and fourth quarter 2002 and the 1120S was for tax
year 2002 which was extended until September 15, 2003. The
man's home address is NOT the address for the business and
never has been and appears absolutely nowhere in connection
with the business. Also, his wife is not a shareholder of
the company and the agent said that it was strictly
employment and income tax related and not personal
tax-related.

The client called our office in a panic after his wife
returned home and found the business card from the IRS
agent. We had him come into our office the following
morning and he called the agent from there. He executed a
POA, which incidentially the agent never asked us to fax to
her. By the end of the short (7-10 minute) phone call, she
said that if he would mail to her a signed copy of the 940,
the fourth quarter 941 (she found the third quarter) and the
1120S that she would consider the case closed.

This somehow just does not FEEL right. Maybe it is the fact
that he never received any notices for those forms (he said
he didn't and none of us recalled seeing any). Maybe it was
the fact that the agent never did answer the direct question
of why she went to their house. Maybe it was the fact that
she spoke to my employer with the POA being faxed to her.
Maybe it was the "ease" with which there was a solution to
the problem. Maybe it was her lack of knowledge of how a S
corp is taxed. I don't know why but it just does not feel
right.

Any thoughts?
The ONLY way to find out what's up here, is for whoever has
the POA in your firm to visit the IRS agent and discuss the
matter. It sounds so routine to me. And it's possible that
somehow there were notices sent to taxpayer before and he
didn't want to admit that he disregharded them. Yes, that
happens. (I just won an appeal to Alabama on a final
assessment in which the clit vowed that they had NOT
received the first two notices.)

And even though this does not sound like a CD affair, it
would be a good idea when sitting down with the IRS person,
to get some identification. No, I'm not thinking the IRS
person was from CD, but.. stilll........ You need to KNOW
what prompted all this in the first place.

Cheer$,
Harlan Lunsford, EA n LA
 
W

Wayne Brasch

CLJ1219 said:
Anyone heard of this?

One of our clients, a gentleman who has been in business for
greater than 10 years and who has several businesses
throughout that time, received a home visit from an IRS
agent. The client nor his wife were at home at the time of
the visit. It might have been fortunate for the agent since
there had recently been a murder of two real estate agents
at a model home nearby and the wife is a real estate agent.
The home visit was prompted by, according to the agent, late
941s, 940 and a 1120S. The 940 was for 2002, the 941s were
for third and fourth quarter 2002 and the 1120S was for tax
year 2002 which was extended until September 15, 2003. The
man's home address is NOT the address for the business and
never has been and appears absolutely nowhere in connection
with the business. Also, his wife is not a shareholder of
the company and the agent said that it was strictly
employment and income tax related and not personal
tax-related.

The client called our office in a panic after his wife
returned home and found the business card from the IRS
agent. We had him come into our office the following
morning and he called the agent from there. He executed a
POA, which incidentially the agent never asked us to fax to
her. By the end of the short (7-10 minute) phone call, she
said that if he would mail to her a signed copy of the 940,
the fourth quarter 941 (she found the third quarter) and the
1120S that she would consider the case closed.

This somehow just does not FEEL right. Maybe it is the fact
that he never received any notices for those forms (he said
he didn't and none of us recalled seeing any). Maybe it was
the fact that the agent never did answer the direct question
of why she went to their house. Maybe it was the fact that
she spoke to my employer with the POA being faxed to her.
Maybe it was the "ease" with which there was a solution to
the problem. Maybe it was her lack of knowledge of how a S
corp is taxed. I don't know why but it just does not feel
right.

Any thoughts?
Because of the fact that you mention the murders of the two
real estate agents I know where you are. I, too, had a
client that had this happen to them. It almost caused a
divorce between my clients. We have since provided the IRS
agent with all of what he was seeking. There had been no
letters previously sent to my clients about this matter.
The agent just showed up and talked with the husband who
was not a party to the subject matter of the visit. This
man is being treated for depression and this visit did him
no good! I don't know what caused this visit except for the
fact that it has been recently said that the "kinder,
gentler" IRS is a thing of the past. I don't appreciate
this method of contact and have told that agent what I
thought of his methods.

Wayne Brasch, CPA, M. S. Taxation
 
T

TaxmanHog

Wayne Brasch said:
..........................
I don't know what caused this visit except for the
fact that it has been recently said that the "kinder,
gentler" IRS is a thing of the past. I don't appreciate
this method of contact and have told that agent what I
thought of his methods.

Wayne
HQ wants more field visits, the perfunctory notice such as
letter 3164a, b or c should be mailed before personal (read
FIELD) contact attempts are made. Service Center version of
these are systemically sent with CP-504 on bal due accounts,
and Delinquent Return Inquiry letters. Accounts Transcripts
reflect TC-971 AC-611 to indicate the warning was given.

This allows the RO to hit the road quicker on such cases,
941 accounts are critical, 90 day cycle time to perpetual
pyramiding allows little time to dance around with yet more
please, please, please letters, It's time to knock on the
door and make the RO's presence known.

You, as a REP on the account, should be contacted and asked
to MEET the RO at the place of business of the CLIENT for
review & inspection of business operation, overview of
compliance problems & solutions.

In my opinion, not all CLIENTS need this harsh handling
(those not actively PYRAMIDING) might be resolved with
letter(s) 728 (you owe money pay it) and 729 (where is the
tax return(s), we never received them, so what's your
excuse)

If you, the client and the RO can find common ground
everyone will be happy, if not, I am sure you are not
interested in perpetuating the clients non compliance.
 
P

Phil Marti

This somehow just does not FEEL right. Maybe it is the fact
that he never received any notices for those forms (he said
he didn't and none of us recalled seeing any). Maybe it was
the fact that the agent never did answer the direct question
of why she went to their house. Maybe it was the fact that
she spoke to my employer with the POA being faxed to her.
Maybe it was the "ease" with which there was a solution to
the problem. Maybe it was her lack of knowledge of how a S
corp is taxed. I don't know why but it just does not feel
right.
A couple of things come to mind. Is the client being
considered for some sort of government position? In my day
they were called "type X" investigations and you were
expressly forbidden from telling the taxpayer why you were
doing a compliance check.

I'm assuming this was a revenue officer, not an agent, and
there are sometimes compliance checks that are part of
special programs outside the usual processing we expect.

In any case, a quick call to whatever Inspection is nowadays
will determine whether she's really IRS or not. You don't
sound outraged, and it doesn't sound like she did anything
particularly awful, so it would be nice of you to approach
it from the "we haven't ever had this experience before and
wanted to make sure this isn't an IRS imposter."

Phil Marti
Topeka, KS
 
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C

CLJ1219

It sounds so routine to me. And it's possible that
somehow there were notices sent to taxpayer before and he
didn't want to admit that he disregharded them
Harlan,

That was the thing--it *was* such a routine matter. Why the
home visit for something so routine and so fresh?

FWIW, if this client said he didn't receive any notices, as
far as we're concerned, he didn't. He is probably our most
honest and truthful client. We are quite sure we didn't see
any notices. We handle all notices as they come in and
don't recall these coming in. Also, the agent wouldn't tell
us why she made the home visit opposed to a notice and could
not tell us if notices had been sent previously. She said
she did not know if notices had been sent already. Carol

What can one expect of a day that begins with getting out of bed.
Semper Gumby (Always Flexible)
 
C

CLJ1219

Because of the fact that you mention the murders of the two
real estate agents I know where you are.
You must be in this area as well. I doubt this made news
very many places except here and where they arrested the
alledged killer. And for those of you wondering, the two
locations were quite some distance apart.
I, too, had a client that had this happen to them.
In this area?
The agent just showed up and talked with the husband who
was not a party to the subject matter of the visit.
And the agents name would be?????? Just kidding. I saw you
said you told the agent you didn't appreciate his method of
contact. Ours was a female agent.

So an agent can just show up and start talking with someone
who is not a party to the matter they are dealing with?
Without a POA?

Carol

What can one expect of a day that begins with getting out of bed.
Semper Gumby (Always Flexible)
 
W

Wayne Brasch

HQ wants more field visits, the perfunctory notice such as
letter 3164a, b or c should be mailed before personal (read
FIELD) contact attempts are made. Service Center version of
these are systemically sent with CP-504 on bal due accounts,
and Delinquent Return Inquiry letters. Accounts Transcripts
reflect TC-971 AC-611 to indicate the warning was given.

This allows the RO to hit the road quicker on such cases,
941 accounts are critical, 90 day cycle time to perpetual
pyramiding allows little time to dance around with yet more
please, please, please letters, It's time to knock on the
door and make the RO's presence known.

You, as a REP on the account, should be contacted and asked
to MEET the RO at the place of business of the CLIENT for
review & inspection of business operation, overview of
compliance problems & solutions.

In my opinion, not all CLIENTS need this harsh handling
(those not actively PYRAMIDING) might be resolved with
letter(s) 728 (you owe money pay it) and 729 (where is the
tax return(s), we never received them, so what's your
excuse)

If you, the client and the RO can find common ground
everyone will be happy, if not, I am sure you are not
interested in perpetuating the clients non compliance.
I never perpetuate my clients non-compliance, but in the
case I was referring to no letters had been sent to the main
address of this business and the Revenue Officer showed up
at the door of one of the owners homes. I believe letters
sent prior to the visit would have been a more appropriate
way to handle this particular matter.

Wayne Brasch, CPA, M. S. Taxation
 
R

Rufus Leaking

A couple of things come to mind. Is the client being
considered for some sort of government position? In my day
they were called "type X" investigations and you were
expressly forbidden from telling the taxpayer why you were
doing a compliance check.
Interestingly enough, I've gone thru 4 SCIF background
checks and never, ever has the IRS been invited to
investigate.

An FOIA request got me the contents of the SCIFB's from my
FBI file and nary a peep from the Revenuers....

Dave

"Hid in the reeds are eyes that peek,
voices I don't understand.
Flamingos fly endlessly,
To the silent sky"
 
C

CLJ1219

I am sure you are not
interested in perpetuating the clients non compliance.
But that's the key--all taxes had been paid and accounted
for! Only forms were missing.

Carol

What can one expect of a day that begins with getting out of bed.
Semper Gumby (Always Flexible)
 
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C

CLJ1219

Is the client being
considered for some sort of government position?
LOL. Not to our knowledge. He is quite happy doing what he
has done for almost 20 years.
You don't sound outraged,
No. Just don't want a good client, a good citizen harassed.
it doesn't sound like she did anything
particularly awful,
confusing is more like it. It sounded like such a big deal
on Wednesday afternoon only to be handled with "if you will
get me those forms in the mail today we will close this out"
on Thursday.

Carol
 
D

D. Stussy

CLJ1219 said:
Anyone heard of this?

One of our clients, a gentleman who has been in business for
greater than 10 years and who has several businesses
throughout that time, received a home visit from an IRS
agent. The client nor his wife were at home at the time of
the visit. It might have been fortunate for the agent since
there had recently been a murder of two real estate agents
at a model home nearby and the wife is a real estate agent.
The home visit was prompted by, according to the agent, late
941s, 940 and a 1120S. The 940 was for 2002, the 941s were
for third and fourth quarter 2002 and the 1120S was for tax
year 2002 which was extended until September 15, 2003. The
man's home address is NOT the address for the business and
never has been and appears absolutely nowhere in connection
with the business. Also, his wife is not a shareholder of
the company and the agent said that it was strictly
employment and income tax related and not personal
tax-related.

The client called our office in a panic after his wife
returned home and found the business card from the IRS
agent. We had him come into our office the following
morning and he called the agent from there. He executed a
POA, which incidentially the agent never asked us to fax to
her. By the end of the short (7-10 minute) phone call, she
said that if he would mail to her a signed copy of the 940,
the fourth quarter 941 (she found the third quarter) and the
1120S that she would consider the case closed.

This somehow just does not FEEL right. Maybe it is the fact
that he never received any notices for those forms (he said
he didn't and none of us recalled seeing any). Maybe it was
the fact that the agent never did answer the direct question
of why she went to their house. Maybe it was the fact that
she spoke to my employer with the POA being faxed to her.
Maybe it was the "ease" with which there was a solution to
the problem. Maybe it was her lack of knowledge of how a S
corp is taxed. I don't know why but it just does not feel
right.
In general, home visits are usually scheduled in advance.
During my IRS career, there were only two exceptions that I
know of (and did):

1) In the "non-filer" program, IRS employees (including
myself) would actively go into the field without
announcement looking for those who failed to respond to our
letters and phone calls. Our purpose in doing so was to try
to make contact - or to verify that the taxpayer had moved,
etc....

2) Again, in the "non-filer" program, I once did show up at
the taxpayer's business unannounced. Although the taxpayer
did contact me and send in a tax return, we (my superior and
I) didn't find it credible - and the purpose of the visit
was first to look over the business (he failed to report)
for indications of activity that supported what we thought
might be the true story. The unannounced part was when I
then walked in and informed the taxpayer owner that it
appears that there were descrepencies and that his return
was going to be audited. Upon return to my office, I then
sent him a list of the issues attached to the official
examination opening letter.

Neither of these situations seem close enough to what you
describe with merely late payroll tax returns being
examined. However, also note that I left the IRS about 10
years ago, so policy may have changed. Lastly, it occurs to
me that this could have been a Revenue Officer (i.e.
"collection" agent) call instead of an examination call -
and for some sort of compliance purpose. It does seem
strange that for a business return, the call would come to
the home UNLESS the business changed location in the past 3
years - and for some reason, isn't listed in the local phone
book.

Does the business card address belong to a known IRS office
for your area? If not, you could ask TIGTA - on the grounds
of this being an "irregular visit" (at best) and an IMPOSTOR
case (at worst).
 
J

Joel Berry, CPA

Wayne Brasch said:
I don't know what caused this visit except for the
fact that it has been recently said that the "kinder,
gentler" IRS is a thing of the past.
I'm glad to hear someone else make this statement. I've
noticed this with the last couple of audits I've been
involved with.

Joel Berry, CPA
Sugar Land, Texas
 
T

TaxmanHog

I never perpetuate my clients non-compliance, but in the
case I was referring to no letters had been sent to the main
address of this business and the Revenue Officer showed up
at the door of one of the owners homes. I believe letters
sent prior to the visit would have been a more appropriate
way to handle this particular matter.
I see the RRA-98 pendulum starting to swing in the other
direction, HQ's advice to the field to clamp down on
excessive delays in making what is called FIRST CONTACT, by
issuing preliminary letters before field contact.

I personally am still trying to find the correct balance of
soft handling VS Blitzkrieg handling, timing and turn over
to close cases is the driving force, risking poor quality
investigations & unprofessional conduct and inappropriate
dispositions might be the end result of this campaign.

Not that I would allow that to happen myself, I can & do see
it happening in the office.

In the above case and the original posters statement, I saw
lack of professionalism by the RO by NOT identifying
themselves! All field personnel are required to Identify
themselves by MR./MS Surname, and Employee Number!, they can
leave a calling card which contains this information.

The only excuse I can make, and it's lame, is that THIRD
PARTY pre warnings were not sent, and the Officer/Agent was
aware of that fact, they tried to remain discreet after
encountering the spouse, this behavior was a unsuccessful
attempt to NOT violate the privacy of the TAXPAYER being
investigated, they ended up making investigative
disclosures, and embarrassed the Business Owner.

Some of the investigations being done with minimal
precontact by letter are: FTD ALERTS

This is a type of case where the 941 tax deposits are
suddenly slowing in a QUARTER, the master file generated a
letter to the TP asking why they are slow in depositing, in
the old days (six months ago and prior) a paper follow-up
record is also printed for tax examiners or revenue officers
to follow-up on when time permits.

The NEW & IMPROVED version of ICS release last summer now
allows these PAPER ALERT FOLLOW-UP records to load in a
group managers incoming inventory immediately, he then has
to triage & assign these to all his Officers, who in turn
++++NEED++++ to make in person contact in FIFTEEN DAYS, or
else! bad reviews will result.

No more playing games with the timing of this compliance
investigation! The follow-up activity in the case is
critical to both seriously non compliant taxpayers and
marginal non-compliant, This is what early intervention is
all about, if I recall correctly it was an issue with GAO,
Congress and the President that the IRS get out there and
stop the hemorrhaging. This automation improvement combined
with RRA-98 protocols, and schizophrenic Management
attitudes HQ & LOCAL, leaves the RO stuck in a kind of
dilemma.
 
T

TaxmanHog

I am sure you are not
But that's the key--all taxes had been paid and accounted
for! Only forms were missing.
The final act of accounting, --IS-- the filing of the
returns, it completes circular loop of automated checks &
balances.

Example: In the last six months I have had SEVERAL cases
which involved 941 accounts where the TP had made all their
FTD's deposits on time and in perfect amounts, but failed to
file the 941 returns, 1, 2, 3 & 4 quarters in a row!?

What logical reason could explain this?

When I made contact, it became apparent that the TP either
changed payroll systems, service companies, or signed up for
EFTPS, in all cases they appeared to develop the perception
that the return(s) were being filed by the act of either
ADP/PAYCHEX/INTERPAY executing the deposits currently that
the period prior to the transition would be taken care of,
it never did, and in these particular cases it was a one
period 941 filing lapse.

One CPA, thought that by making the TELEPHONE EFTPS deposit
that they were also fulfilling their obligation to file the
941, not so of course, I got her straightened out, things
are resolved.

In all these cases once I secured the TAX RETURN, it posted
and settled to Status-10 (No balance due no refund due)
perfect! The end result of all these cases was an
opportunity to show the professional face of the IRS to Tax
payers with Benin (retrospectively speaking) issues.
 
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C

CLJ1219

I never perpetuate my clients non-compliance

Neither do we. However, we are quick to remind them that we
can only tell them what they need to pay. It is up to them
to actually *do* that.
I was referring to no letters had been sent to the main
address of this business
As far as we can tell, no letters had been sent to ANY
address for this client--his business address or home
address. And his home address has either NEVER shown up on
returns for the corporation or haven't in several years.
<G> And we missed putting his new home address on his K-1
this past year.

Carol

What can one expect of a day that begins with getting out of bed.
Semper Gumby (Always Flexible)
 
C

CLJ1219

It does seem strange that for a business return, the call would
come to the home UNLESS the business changed location in the
past 3 years - and for some reason, isn't listed in the local
phone book.
He did move his business location but it was probably more
like 4 or 5 years ago. It has been quite some time at any
rate. He's a builder, so he works out of a construction
office in the subdivision.

Carol

What can one expect of a day that begins with getting out of bed.
Semper Gumby (Always Flexible)
 
H

Harlan Lunsford

It sounds so routine to me. And it's possible that
That was the thing--it *was* such a routine matter. Why the
home visit for something so routine and so fresh?

FWIW, if this client said he didn't receive any notices, as
far as we're concerned, he didn't. He is probably our most
honest and truthful client. We are quite sure we didn't see
any notices. We handle all notices as they come in and
don't recall these coming in. Also, the agent wouldn't tell
us why she made the home visit opposed to a notice and could
not tell us if notices had been sent previously. She said
she did not know if notices had been sent already. Carol
Probably notices were mailed, since that's SOP for IRS.
Where they ended up is anybody's guess. (Change of
address? Post office problems?)

But you know there is one more possibility,and that is that
the IRS agent who was assigned the case needed an excuse to
get out of the office. So instead of using the telephone,
she took a whole day, see what I mean? I find even the
rare audits that I do indulge in, it's always at my office,
cause these local IRS types just love to get out of the
office.
What can one expect of a day that begins with getting out of bed.
Semper Gumby (Always Flexible)
One thing you might try before bounding out of bed is waking
up gradually, stretching like a snake, bending and
stretching, exercising in bed before the feet hit the floor.

Cheer$,
HL
 
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C

Charles Markham, EA

Carol:

I have seen this exact same thing happen recently. The IRS
goes on various projects. I believe they recently decided
to have Revenue Officers visit small businesses that have a
history of being slightly "irregular" in their filings. I
had two cases of this in the Boston area. You described the
scenario to a T.

I know you feel this was a waste of taxpayer money, but I
must think that for my clients it really was a wake up call,
and really a very inexpensive one for the IRS. Just the
travel time, and I think sloppy lackadasical filing habits
are "stepping stones" to getting very behind in things like
payroll taxes.

So, while I agree it wasn't the standard operating
procedure, it must be a new one.

Charles
 

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