Housing benefit and rent


S

starlite145

Hi I would really appreciate some advice on a very difficult situation.
My parents have lived in the same house for over 14 years and a few
years ago my dad lost his job. SInce then he has not found any
employment and so they recieve housing benefits. As this is the house
we all lived in (4 children 2 adults) they originally recieved all the
rent. Since then two of my siblings and I left home leaving 1 12 year
old and 2 adults.

I have recently moved back in temporarily whilst looking for a place of
my own with my new baby. I have just been made redundant. Now housing
benefits are saying that they can not pay for a house of this size for
3 people. The shortfall is too much for my parents to make up so I have
considered moving in permanently to solve this issue but really it is
not a good solution because I need my own space for my own family.

What happens if my parents cant make up the shortfall of the rent? Isnt
there any rules to protect them so they can stay in this house- finding
another house / flat inthe area would be difficult- not many landlords
accept housing benefit and my sister is in the nearby school. The rent
is not very different to the price of an average two bedroom place in
the area.

Are there any housing benefit experts that can help me?
 
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S

Sue

In the Extra Info section of the HB claim form
starlite145 said:
benefits are saying that they can not pay for a house of this size for
3 people. The shortfall is too much for my parents to make up so I have
considered moving in permanently to solve this issue but really it is
not a good solution because I need my own space for my own family.

What happens if my parents cant make up the shortfall of the rent? Isnt
there any rules to protect them so they can stay in this house- finding
another house / flat inthe area would be difficult- not many landlords
accept housing benefit and my sister is in the nearby school. The rent
is not very different to the price of an average two bedroom place in
the area.
Unless they've been living there since before January 1989 (the rules
would be different then) it's not much help I'm afraid.

The rules are made in Westminster, and they say HB will only pay for one
room for each couple or person over 10 years old, plus living room
kitchen and bathroom.
Your Council can pay the extra itself (ie out of your neighbours'
Council Tax) but it's only allowed to pay a certain amount a year for
the whole district. Most councils use the money to give people extra
time to find another place, not to keep them permanently in a place
that's too large. There's no harm in applying: it's called a
Discretionary Housing Payment.
They should be able to give you a list of landlords who do let to
tenants on HB. It's easier to get a new tenancy if your old landlord
will give you a good reference.

They could stay put if they can take a lodger: there'd be a different
reduction in HB, but they'd have the rent coming in to pay it with.
 
Z

Zoe Brown

starlite145 said:
Hi I would really appreciate some advice on a very difficult situation.
My parents have lived in the same house for over 14 years and a few
years ago my dad lost his job. SInce then he has not found any
employment and so they recieve housing benefits. As this is the house
we all lived in (4 children 2 adults) they originally recieved all the
rent. Since then two of my siblings and I left home leaving 1 12 year
old and 2 adults.

I have recently moved back in temporarily whilst looking for a place of
my own with my new baby. I have just been made redundant. Now housing
benefits are saying that they can not pay for a house of this size for
3 people. The shortfall is too much for my parents to make up so I have
considered moving in permanently to solve this issue but really it is
not a good solution because I need my own space for my own family.
How big is the house and how many people are living in it currently. If
your parents can't afford it because it is too big then they will have to
move. Simple.
 
R

Robbie

Zoe said:
How big is the house and how many people are living in it currently. If
your parents can't afford it because it is too big then they will have to
move. Simple.
It may be simple but it's not particularly nice.

Unfortunately HB takes no consideration of how long someone has lived in
a property. To some people it's not just an address, it's their home and
no doubt they've invested a lot of money in the property. Saying
"simple" sounds rather heartless.

Robbie
 
S

Sue

In the Extra Info section of the HB claim form
their home and no doubt they've invested a lot of money in the
property. Saying "simple" sounds rather heartless.
It'd be a rented house or we wouldn't be discussing HB on it; houses the
occupier owns or mortgages aren't eligible for HB.

Most people dislike moving, even when they have everything to gain by
grasping the nettle and finding somewhere else to live.
I know someone who has a room in a damp house structurally neglected by
a greedy and inconsiderate landlady who's been trying to sell the place.
If she'd moved as soon as she knew about that, she could've taken her
time finding a new place (it's been months).
If she waited for the landlady to give her notice, she'd get two months.
As it is, the landlady couldn't sell the dump and her mortgagees have
repossessed it; my friend's been given notice to get out at once, though
she'll go to court and they'll probably give her four weeks.

The OP's parents would gain security by finding a place where they
aren't overaccomodated, but their offspring wouldn't then be able to
change their minds about moving back in.
 
Z

Zoe Brown

Robbie said:
It may be simple but it's not particularly nice.

Unfortunately HB takes no consideration of how long someone has lived in a
property. To some people it's not just an address, it's their home and no
doubt they've invested a lot of money in the property. Saying "simple"
sounds rather heartless.
Not nice, but nobody is entitled to live in the same house for years.
People with jobs loose them and have to sell up all the time. Shite happens
and to be honest I see no reason why the state would want to help a couple
stay in a house when they do not need the space. They can move to a smaller
property and have their rent paid for them there.
 
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A

anthonyberet

starlite145 said:
Hi I would really appreciate some advice on a very difficult situation.
My parents have lived in the same house for over 14 years and a few
years ago my dad lost his job. SInce then he has not found any
employment and so they recieve housing benefits. As this is the house
we all lived in (4 children 2 adults) they originally recieved all the
rent. Since then two of my siblings and I left home leaving 1 12 year
old and 2 adults.

I have recently moved back in temporarily whilst looking for a place of
my own with my new baby. I have just been made redundant. Now housing
benefits are saying that they can not pay for a house of this size for
3 people. The shortfall is too much for my parents to make up so I have
considered moving in permanently to solve this issue but really it is
not a good solution because I need my own space for my own family.

What happens if my parents cant make up the shortfall of the rent? Isnt
there any rules to protect them so they can stay in this house- finding
another house / flat inthe area would be difficult- not many landlords
accept housing benefit and my sister is in the nearby school. The rent
is not very different to the price of an average two bedroom place in
the area.

Are there any housing benefit experts that can help me?
Exactly how big is the house? - how many bedrooms and living rooms are
there?

Your parents should apply for Discretionary Housing Payment - this is a
possible top-up to the HB which could cover some or all of the shortfall.
DHP is usually only paid for limited periods, but you can but try.
- Good grounds for claiming DHP are the amount of time they have lived
there, and perhaps that the 12 year old needs to be near their school etc.
The limit they set to the rent should be the average amount for a 2-bed,
so the fact that theirs is not too much more is good.
Another possibility is to ask the landlord if they can renegotiate the
rent - not easy but I am aware of cases where that has been the
solution. - in view of their long tenancy, the landlord may agree.
 

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