How pedantic are banks?


U

Uncle Peter

I've got a cheque here from an elderly lady dated Nov 13th 1940. Reckon the bank will accept it?
 
Ad

Advertisements

D

David L. Martel

Peter,

If the check is actually from 1940 it will be rejected as a "stale"
check. The bank teller should have no difficulty recognizing the check as
quite old.
If the date on the check is just an error then it's hard to say whether
the teller will notice the problem. If the teller does, he should reject the
check and advise you to get a new check.
I'd gamble on the teller not noticing the date.

Good luck,
Dave M.
 
U

Uncle Peter

Shouldn't the teller realise it's a mistake and just accept it? I mean if the date was 6 months ago, it could be an old cheque, and the person who wrote it should not be expecting it to be cashed, but clearly this cheque is not a 1940s cheque, so it's a mistake. We'll see....


Peter,

If the check is actually from 1940 it will be rejected as a "stale"
check. The bank teller should have no difficulty recognizing the check as
quite old.
If the date on the check is just an error then it's hard to say whether
the teller will notice the problem. If the teller does, he should reject the
check and advise you to get a new check.
I'd gamble on the teller not noticing the date.

Good luck,
Dave M.
 
B

Bod

I've got a cheque here from an elderly lady dated Nov 13th 1940. Reckon
the bank will accept it?
Probably not:
A cheque is valid for as long as the debt between the two parties
(i.e. issuer and payee) exists. In other words, cheques don’t have an
expiration date. However, it is common banking practice to reject
cheques that are over six months old to protect the payer, in case the
payment has been made another way or the cheque may have been lost or
stolen.
 
D

David Woolley

Shouldn't the teller realise it's a mistake and just accept it? I mean
if the date was 6 months ago, it could be an old cheque, and the person
who wrote it should not be expecting it to be cashed, but clearly this
cheque is not a 1940s cheque, so it's a mistake. We'll see....
Given the circumstances described, an alert bank might take this as an
indication of dementia and start scrutinising all the lady's
transactions carefully.
 
N

Nightjar

Given the circumstances described, an alert bank might take this as an
indication of dementia and start scrutinising all the lady's
transactions carefully.
Starting by rejecting this cheque, in case she didn't realise what she
was doing when she wrote it.
 
F

Flop

I've got a cheque here from an elderly lady dated Nov 13th 1940. Reckon
the bank will accept it?
If the cheque was for the sum of £20 15s 2p, the bank teller may notice.
 
N

Norman Wells

Flop said:
If the cheque was for the sum of £20 15s 2p, the bank teller may
notice.
But not if it was for £20 15s 2d presumably.
 
M

Mel Rowing

If the cheque was for the sum of £20 15s 2p, the bank teller may notice.
He certainly would since the sum would be £20 15s 2d !

In any case the chances are that the account against which the cheque
was drawn no longer exists. When an account is closed, any cleared
cheques are first honoured from it. Others are referred to drawer.

Cheques are not drawn against banks but the accounts of customers, They
are instructions of a customer to his bank with regard to his account.
The bank will carry them out only if it is in a position to do so.
 
U

Uncle Peter

Probably not:
A cheque is valid for as long as the debt between the two parties
(i.e. issuer and payee) exists. In other words, cheques don’t have an
expiration date. However, it is common banking practice to reject
cheques that are over six months old to protect the payer, in case the
payment has been made another way or the cheque may have been lost or
stolen.
I assume "discretionary" includes cheques which have quite obviously been dated wrongly. If the cheque was really from 1940, it would look very old and yellow or tattered, and be of a completely different design.
 
U

Uncle Peter

Given the circumstances described, an alert bank might take this as an
indication of dementia and start scrutinising all the lady's
transactions carefully.
She does have dementia or something similar. She's not at all with it. That doesn't mean the bank should have any right to interfere, that's up to her relatives.
 
U

Uncle Peter

Starting by rejecting this cheque, in case she didn't realise what she
was doing when she wrote it.
I would only agree if it was a particularly large cheque. Giving her more things to do in an already difficult life is just mean.
 
U

Uncle Peter

He certainly would since the sum would be £20 15s 2d !

In any case the chances are that the account against which the cheque
was drawn no longer exists. When an account is closed, any cleared
cheques are first honoured from it. Others are referred to drawer.

Cheques are not drawn against banks but the accounts of customers, They
are instructions of a customer to his bank with regard to his account.
The bank will carry them out only if it is in a position to do so.
Um, you're assuming this cheque was written in 1940?!
 
R

RobertL

I've got a cheque here from an elderly lady dated Nov 13th 1940. Reckon the bank will accept it?

I once found a cheque I had failed to pay in for nearly two years. I waited until just after it's second 'birthday' and paid it in with no trouble.

Robert
 
D

David L. Martel

Peter
Shouldn't the teller realise it's a mistake and just accept it?
No. The teller should follow the bank's procedures if he wishes to remain
employed.
I'd still just present the check. There's a good chance the teller won't
notice the date. Clearly, you did not.

Good luck,
DaveM.
 
F

Frank Turner-Smith G3VKI

I assume "discretionary" includes cheques which have quite obviously
been dated wrongly. If the cheque was really from 1940, it would look
very old and yellow or tattered, and be of a completely different design.
Also the amount to pay would be in Pounds, Shillings and Pence.

I once avoided a wheel clamp fee by writing last years date on the
cheque. The bank spotted it and returned the cheque. The wheel clamper
didn't have my address. Win, win.

Frank Turner-Smith
 
D

David Woolley

She does have dementia or something similar. She's not at all with it.
That doesn't mean the bank should have any right to interfere, that's up
to her relatives.
Banks have a duty of care only to accept instructions from people who
have mental capacity. They are the first line of defence against fraud
by carers and dodgy tradesmen.
 
Ad

Advertisements

M

Martin Brown

It will probably fail in clearing and if you are unlucky lock down her
account completely depending on how convincing her signature is compared
to the one that the bank holds on file.
She does have dementia or something similar. She's not at all with it.
That doesn't mean the bank should have any right to interfere, that's up
to her relatives.
They have a duty of care to her and as such will be cautious.

You will find then that at some point her degraded signature or mistakes
made on cheques will trigger a failure and they will then bounce any and
all transactions until you register an LPA with them.

Even then after registering the LPA some banks can be complete bastards
and demand a letter from the GP *in addition* to the formal LPA.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top