How pedantic are banks?


M

Mrcheerful

I've got a cheque here from an elderly lady dated Nov 13th 1940. Reckon
the bank will accept it?
It happens to me sometimes, I just change the date and write their
initials by it.
 
Ad

Advertisements

P

Paul Pot

Uncle Peter used his keyboard to write :
I would only agree if it was a particularly large cheque. Giving her
more things to do in an already difficult life is just mean.

Be a man, rip up the cheque and send her the goods with a note
explaining her mistake but you drank a bottle of milk-of-human-kindness
and she owes you nothing.

One can only have hope...
 
U

Uncle Peter

Uncle Peter used his keyboard to write :


Be a man, rip up the cheque and send her the goods with a note
explaining her mistake but you drank a bottle of milk-of-human-kindness
and she owes you nothing.

One can only have hope...
She already has the goods. If the bank don't cash the cheque I don't get the £11. I wouldn't bother going back to get another cheque off herfor £11.
 
U

Uncle Peter

It happens to me sometimes, I just change the date and write their
initials by it.
Good idea, I'll try that. Makes a mockery of the initialling thing really.
 
U

Uncle Peter

Good idea, I'll try that. Makes a mockery of the initialling thing really.
On second thoughts, I'd never get the pen and handwriting to look the same.
 
U

Uncle Peter

It will probably fail in clearing and if you are unlucky lock down her
account completely depending on how convincing her signature is compared
to the one that the bank holds on file.
That would be her bad luck not mine. Why would they lock an account because of something like that?
They have a duty of care to her and as such will be cautious.
Duty of care? WTF are you on about? The bank is not her doctor and it's really none of their business.
You will find then that at some point her degraded signature
Everybody's signature changes over time, and degrades with age. A shaky hand does not mean you are not sound of mind.
or mistakes
made on cheques will trigger a failure and they will then bounce any and
all transactions until you register an LPA with them.

Even then after registering the LPA some banks can be complete bastards
and demand a letter from the GP *in addition* to the formal LPA.
My grandmother got an LPA by my mother and uncle, she's not doo-lally, but is quite ill and wanted things looking after for her. The banks were very difficult. Signed letters all over the place before anything could get done, and they kept fucking about. Harder still that my mother lives nowhere near her (although her uncle does).
 
U

Uncle Peter

Banks have a duty of care only to accept instructions from people who
have mental capacity. They are the first line of defence against fraud
by carers and dodgy tradesmen.
Why on earth should the bank be looking out for it? It's absolutely nothing to do with them and they should keep their noses out. Relatives should notice the signs and get an LPA.
 
U

Uncle Peter

Also the amount to pay would be in Pounds, Shillings and Pence.

I once avoided a wheel clamp fee by writing last years date on the
cheque. The bank spotted it and returned the cheque. The wheel clamper
didn't have my address. Win, win.
So you handed the cheque to the wheelclamper and he unlocked it without looking closely?
 
U

Uncle Peter

I once found a cheque I had failed to pay in for nearly two years. I waited until just after it's second 'birthday' and paid it in with no trouble.
If it was 2006, easy enough to loop the 6 to make an 8 anyway.
 
M

Mrcheerful

On second thoughts, I'd never get the pen and handwriting to look the same.
the pen does not need to match, they changed it on a later date than
they wrote the initial cheque.
 
U

Uncle Peter

the pen does not need to match, they changed it on a later date than
they wrote the initial cheque.
Ok I'll try it and blame you when it gets rejected :)
 
F

Frank Turner-Smith G3VKI

So you handed the cheque to the wheelclamper and he unlocked it without
looking closely?
Yup. I don't think brains are essential for that sort of job.
 
D

David Woolley

Why on earth should the bank be looking out for it? It's absolutely
nothing to do with them and they should keep their noses out. Relatives
should notice the signs and get an LPA.
Relatives are amongst the most likely people to be financially abusing
someone in that position. Some of the worst cases are where the
relatives are completely out of the picture.

Only the person themselves can get an LPA and they have to have
appropriate mental capacity at the time to do so**. People with
dementia can be very resistant to releasing control, both at the LPA
creation stage and the bringing into effect stage. Relatives can be
afraid of going through the process of telling someone that they should
no longer be allowed to make financial transactions.

Also, there is no legal requirement for banks to stop acting on cheques
because an LPA has been brought into full operation++. They do so
because they treat that as an indication that their client no longer has
the mental capacity to make transactions safely.

** The mental capacity required depend on the task in hand. The
capacity of someone with dementia can be higher at some times than
others. It may be possible to make a valid LPA at a time when it would
not be safe to make large financial transactions.

++ My specific experience is with EPAs, where there they could only be
used once capacity was lost.
 
P

Paul Pot

Uncle Peter presented the following explanation :
She already has the goods. If the bank don't cash the cheque I don't
get the £11. I wouldn't bother going back to get another cheque off
her for £11.

Good, forget about it. I hope you don't lose sleep over it.
 
U

Uncle Peter

Uncle Peter presented the following explanation :

Good, forget about it. I hope you don't lose sleep over it.
I was just wondering how pedantic banks are.
 
Ad

Advertisements

U

Uncle Peter

Relatives are amongst the most likely people to be financially abusing
someone in that position. Some of the worst cases are where the
relatives are completely out of the picture.

Only the person themselves can get an LPA and they have to have
appropriate mental capacity at the time to do so**. People with
dementia can be very resistant to releasing control, both at the LPA
creation stage and the bringing into effect stage. Relatives can be
afraid of going through the process of telling someone that they should
no longer be allowed to make financial transactions.

Also, there is no legal requirement for banks to stop acting on cheques
because an LPA has been brought into full operation++. They do so
because they treat that as an indication that their client no longer has
the mental capacity to make transactions safely.

** The mental capacity required depend on the task in hand. The
capacity of someone with dementia can be higher at some times than
others. It may be possible to make a valid LPA at a time when it would
not be safe to make large financial transactions.

++ My specific experience is with EPAs, where there they could only be
used once capacity was lost.
So what are you expecting the bank to do, considering you said that "Only the person themselves can get an LPA"?
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top