Inheritance


N

Niteawk

SS said:
I suppose this is slightly off subject, but if the OP had a mortgage and
was struggling along from month to month on benefits and then recieved
this inheritance and used it to pay off their mortgage, would that be
acceptable?
The alternative possibly losing their home for mortgage default and having
to be re housed.
In this scenario you can hardly be accused of disposing of capital for
keeping the roof over your head. I doubt if you would even need to declare
the inheritance if it was as good as gone before you even received it, in
theory you could instruct the solicitor to send it to the mortgage lender to
cover arrears.
 
Ad

Advertisements

S

SS

Niteawk said:
In this scenario you can hardly be accused of disposing of capital for
keeping the roof over your head. I doubt if you would even need to declare
the inheritance if it was as good as gone before you even received it, in
theory you could instruct the solicitor to send it to the mortgage lender
to cover arrears.
Although I agree with your reply (I am not sure if its the job center or the
council tax office, or both)
But they ask if you have savings over a certain amount and if you have then
you dont get whatever the payment or claim is.
In theory the inheritance would be deemed as savings abeit short term until
he paid his mortgage off.
I suspect if they knew (or you declared it) they would not pay out.
 
R

Robbie

SS said:
Although I agree with your reply (I am not sure if its the job center or the
council tax office, or both)
But they ask if you have savings over a certain amount and if you have then
you dont get whatever the payment or claim is.
In theory the inheritance would be deemed as savings abeit short term until
he paid his mortgage off.
I suspect if they knew (or you declared it) they would not pay out.
If you get money which takes your savings above the savings limit you
HAVE to declare it regardless of what you do with it next. What you do
with it next then determines whether you are classed as having
reasonably spent the money. Paying off pressing debts and especially a
debt that is being pursued through the courts and even more especially
paying off a debt which would help you keep your home are considered
reasonable to pay and would not lead to a ruling that you are still
deemed to have the money. But you MUST tell them when you get the money,
even if it doesn't stay in your account very long. Ignore "advice" that
tells you otherwise.
 
N

Niteawk

SS said:
Although I agree with your reply (I am not sure if its the job center or
the council tax office, or both)
But they ask if you have savings over a certain amount and if you have
then you dont get whatever the payment or claim is.
In theory the inheritance would be deemed as savings abeit short term
until he paid his mortgage off.
I suspect if they knew (or you declared it) they would not pay out.
They ask about savings and capital when you first apply for benefits. 16k is
the amount you are allowed to have in savings, over this amount and benefit
is reduced, and depending how much over can mean no entitlement to benefits
at all. Now that I think of it, the nature of the mortgage means you will
always be in debt but mortgage or interest payments may not be more than 16k
in arrears or the house would have been repossessed by now. In this scenario
paying a lump sum to reduce the size of a mortgage or interest payments
could be seen as disposing of capital.

IOW if you spent the inheritance to simply reduce the size of your mortgage
as opposed to covering actual mortgage arrears, you may have a real problem
explaining the reasons for this when you declared it. And there is always
the danger of them finding out if you do not declare it, any payments above
10k going into your bank ac is reported to the police under money laundering
laws.
 
N

Niteawk

Robbie said:
If you get money which takes your savings above the savings limit you HAVE
to declare it regardless of what you do with it next. What you do with it
next then determines whether you are classed as having reasonably spent
the money. Paying off pressing debts and especially a debt that is being
pursued through the courts and even more especially paying off a debt
which would help you keep your home are considered reasonable to pay and
would not lead to a ruling that you are still deemed to have the money.
But you MUST tell them when you get the money, even if it doesn't stay in
your account very long. Ignore "advice" that tells you otherwise.
I must agree with this, it would be wrong of me to suggest otherwise. The
way things work these days it is virtually impossible to hide large sums of
money from the authorities. I should know, my mattress is full and its
affecting my sleep being squashed against the ceiling. ;)
 
A

Alex Potter

I should know, my mattress is full and its affecting my sleep being
squashed against the ceiling.
Obviously not living on Pension Credit, then :)
 
Ad

Advertisements

M

mart2306

I have to disagree, living standards has everything to do with a healthy
life style. Its a know fact that people in more deprived areas have a lower
life expectancy that those who live in more affluent areas of society.
<snipped>
Its a known fact is it?

Or are you confusing those with lower incomes having a lower life
expectancy with areas defining people having a lower life expectancy.


There's been quite a bit of research done about deprived areas - some
of which have been deprived for decades.
There used to be a website a few years back where you could type in a
postcode and see which deprivation area you were in. With statistics
for life expectancy along with other figures. And comparing figures to
national averages.
It may be a known fact that people in deprived areas have lower life
expectancy, but are you so sure that its the area causing the problem
and not the people themselves?

Martin <><
 
M

mart2306

People banned from keeping kids have generally proven themselves unfit.
  There will always be exceptions but that's what the legal system is for.

Also the fact that I am still here proves nothing,


I'd LOVE to be in charge of MPs expenses ..... I don't even think it
would necessitate a move to London.  Most benefit customers have to deal
with BDC's far removed.  Pensioners get almost zero responce at JCP
offices so have to use the telephone/post for 99% of interactions.



Very simplistic to blame money, many of those deprived areas have lots
of violent crime & more takeaways!



You can stay fit at home for far less than gym membership.  Walking is
one of the best forms of exercise.  That some people choose drugs is
theri own fault, plenty of people from rough neighbourhoods don't take them.








Is it pointless, understanding how people become reliant on a billion
pound a week benefit?

Mike- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
Can grow healthy foods in a garden or allotment. Can buy cheap meat at
the supermarket or on some markets. A nice casserole for 3 adults can
be made for under £2.50 in ingredients from the supermarket. Grow some
of your own ingredients, cost comes down even further.
As you say Mike, exercise can be had for free. Or for those who like
weights, can be got very simply. Don't even need to use metal weights,
can be books or equipment around the house.

Martin <><
 
R

Robbie

<snipped>
Its a known fact is it?

Or are you confusing those with lower incomes having a lower life
expectancy with areas defining people having a lower life expectancy.


There's been quite a bit of research done about deprived areas - some
of which have been deprived for decades.
There used to be a website a few years back where you could type in a
postcode and see which deprivation area you were in. With statistics
for life expectancy along with other figures. And comparing figures to
national averages.
It may be a known fact that people in deprived areas have lower life
expectancy, but are you so sure that its the area causing the problem
and not the people themselves?

Martin <><
Isn't that a bit like the chicken and egg scenario? An area suffering
from deprivation is where you will find people with a lower life
expectancy - so what causes the people in that area to have a lower
life expectancy? The area itself or because they live there? Which came
first?
 
R

Robbie

Can grow healthy foods in a garden or allotment. Can buy cheap meat at
the supermarket or on some markets. A nice casserole for 3 adults can
be made for under £2.50 in ingredients from the supermarket. Grow some
of your own ingredients, cost comes down even further.
As you say Mike, exercise can be had for free. Or for those who like
weights, can be got very simply. Don't even need to use metal weights,
can be books or equipment around the house.

Martin <><
How do people who live on top of each other and who have no access to an
allotment or a garden grow things? How do you escape grinding misery
caused by poverty of people living on the left, right, above and below
of you when you live on the tenth floor of a twenty floor tower block?
Life isn't always simple for the poorest people as the poorest people
are less likely to have access to things that can help them achieve a
healthier life.
 
M

mart2306

Isn't that a bit like the chicken and egg scenario? An area suffering
from deprivation is where you will find people with a lower life
expectancy  - so what causes the people in that area to have a lower
life expectancy? The area itself or because they live there? Which came
first?
If its environment, the area itself. However there have been studies
showing the poorer people in society have lower life expectancy, more
health problems, lower education and so on.
Of course lots of exceptions - people are people, not numbers.
So move the people to a different area, they will still be the same
people.

Martin <><
 
Ad

Advertisements

M

mart2306

How do people who live on top of each other and who have no access to an
allotment or a garden grow things? How do you escape grinding misery
caused by poverty of people living on the left, right, above and below
of you when you live on the tenth floor of a twenty floor tower block?
Life isn't always simple for the poorest people as the poorest people
are less likely to have access to things that can help them achieve a
healthier life.
Yes, not everyone has access to an allotment. Though I have come
across balcony gardeners, they are few and far between.
The poorer people still have access to fresh produce at the
supermarket or local shops. They also have access to takeaways and
frozen or ready meals.
Five fruit & veg a day is harder, some fruit or veg a day isn't
impossible however.

Martin <><
 
M

mike

How do people who live on top of each other and who have no access to an
allotment or a garden grow things? How do you escape grinding misery
caused by poverty of people living on the left, right, above and below
of you when you live on the tenth floor of a twenty floor tower block?
Life isn't always simple for the poorest people as the poorest people
are less likely to have access to things that can help them achieve a
healthier life.
On the council estate nearest to me, largely occupied by benefit
customers I have NEVER seen a vegetable patch except for the odd
pensioner. Many do however grow a lot of old sofas, bikes, kids toys,
the occasional 1987 Ford Escort and some pretty rank looking grass.

My memory of my grandparents garden pensioners in the 70s on that same
estate, was that almost all the garden was given over to home grown
fruit and veg as were many others around. Even as a KID my parents grew
some veg but this became less and less even when times were quite hard.
Whilst the generation that lived through WW2 thought it was normal to
grow their own produce very few people do now. Most gardens are
ornamental, 'outdoor rooms', playgrounds or tips these days.

Of course the cost of fresh veg has to do with it, even if I turned my
entire garden over to growing veg (9m by 33m approx) I doubt I could
grow more than a few hundred pounds worth of veg and it would require a
lot of effort to do so.

I suppose if I was home all day it would be better than daytime TV!

Mike
 
M

mike

If its environment, the area itself. However there have been studies
showing the poorer people in society have lower life expectancy, more
health problems, lower education and so on.
Of course lots of exceptions - people are people, not numbers.
So move the people to a different area, they will still be the same
people.

Martin<><
In one of the most deprived areas of my city there are more chip, kebab
burger and pizza places than anywhere ouside of a city centre. As they
are there I assume they are making money, ergo a lot of the residents
prefer a donor to a salad.

How long you live has less to do with money than lifestyle, my
grandparents lived well into their 80s and had zero disposable income
for their entire lives.

Mike
 
R

Robbie

mike said:
On the council estate nearest to me, largely occupied by benefit
customers I have NEVER seen a vegetable patch except for the odd
pensioner. Many do however grow a lot of old sofas, bikes, kids toys,
the occasional 1987 Ford Escort and some pretty rank looking grass.

My memory of my grandparents garden pensioners in the 70s on that same
estate, was that almost all the garden was given over to home grown
fruit and veg as were many others around. Even as a KID my parents grew
some veg but this became less and less even when times were quite hard.
Whilst the generation that lived through WW2 thought it was normal to
grow their own produce very few people do now. Most gardens are
ornamental, 'outdoor rooms', playgrounds or tips these days.

Of course the cost of fresh veg has to do with it, even if I turned my
entire garden over to growing veg (9m by 33m approx) I doubt I could
grow more than a few hundred pounds worth of veg and it would require a
lot of effort to do so.

I suppose if I was home all day it would be better than daytime TV!

Mike
Anything is better than Jeremy Kyle!
 
Ad

Advertisements

M

mart2306

In one of the most deprived areas of my city there are more chip, kebab
burger and pizza places than anywhere ouside of a city centre.  As they
are there I assume they are making money, ergo a lot of the residents
prefer a donor to a salad.

How long you live has less to do with money than lifestyle, my
grandparents lived well into their 80s and had zero disposable income
for their entire lives.

Mike- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
Your grandparents probably had more fresh meals than ready meals too.
Possibly a few less takeaways around when they were younger than these
days?

Not that takeaways are all bad. Though regular takeaway plus sedentary
lifestyle isn't good.

I must admit I love a chippy a couple of miles from me (local chippy
the other side of the road from me has disgusting chips and is
expensive).
For 3 adults, chicken and chips is £4.60 for a nice evening takeaway.
Thats cost between us.
Still more expensive than making most of the meals I can do at home,
but a lot less effort. During term time I pick up at least one
takeaway a week, simply due to time.

Martin <><
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Similar Threads

USA Inheritance/gift 2
UK Avoiding IHT and CGT on inherited property company 0
inheritance 5
Inherited annuity to "inherited ira" 10
Inheritance. 1
Inheritance 12
Inheritance 5
Inheritance 7

Top