Installing old QB on new computer


O

Orrie

Hi,
I have been using QB Pro 99 for years, but along the way, I bought an
upgrade copy of 2001 and never got around to installing it. Now I have a new
Win XP computer, and thought I'd install the copy of QB 2001 that has just
been sitting on the shelf. My concern is about transfering my registration
and customizing (toolbars, etc.)

Should I just install the QB 2001, or should I install my old QB Pro 99 and
my data, then install QB 2001?

Thanks.

Orrie
 
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?

_

Most of your customizing is recorded in the company data file, not
part of program configuration, so this is not a reason to install 99
before 2001.

Registration is a different issue, but with a similar conclusion. If
you install QB 99 on the new computer you will have to register
anyway. And most experts and experienced users recommend that you
install a new version in a different folder; for example, do not
install 2001 in the same folder as 99 (which would render 99
inoperable). Thus you'll have to ALSO register 2001 regardless of
what you do with 99.

So the summary conclusion is:
- Install both QB 99 and 2001 on the new computer (in different
folders).
- Assuming you still have use of the old computer, you may be able to
use the registration number for QB 99 on the new computer without
re-registering.
- Regardless of what you do with 99, you will have to register QB 2001
anyway.
- Regardless of what you do - BEFORE you copy your data from old
computer to new:
- Make one or more backup copies of your data and test them on the
old computer to be sure they are good. You might consider making
backups in 2 or more different ways (QB backup, zip or other non-QB
compression, and uncompressed copy) and/or on 2 or more different
media.
- Run the "Verify Data" utility and correct any problems, then
make MORE backup copies and test them as above.
- Ensure your data can be opened on the new computer and is
error-free, then make MORE backup copies on the new computer (and
test) before considering deleting from the old computer.
 
M

Mike Schumann

As a general rule, I do not like to polute my PC with any unnecessary
programs. One of the advantages of a new PC is to be able to start with a
blank disk and get rid of all of the old garbage that builds up and never
goes away over the years.

You shouldn't have to install QBooks 99 at all. Just copy your data file to
the new computer. When you try to open it in QBooks 2001, it will
automatically be converted to the new format and you are on your way.

Mike Schumann
 
?

_

I agree with that policy "as a general rule". Just be absolutely
certain that the data can be opened error-free in the new version on
the new computer while you still have access to the old-version data
on the old computer. If there is any doubt at all, even unreasonable
doubt, it's preferable to tolerate the pollution of a
MAYBE-unnecessary program rather than take even a small risk of being
unable to open the data.
 
M

Mike Schumann

Once you convert your data file to QBooks 2001, you can't go back to QBooks
99. Make sure you keep a backup of your data file. If you run into a
problem and want to go back to QBooks 99, you can always uninstall QBooks
2001 and then install QBooks99.

Mike Schumann
 
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W

Winker

Install QB Pro 99 on the new computer using the original key code and
registration number. Then use a 3.5" to copy your data files over - they
will have the more recent dates.

Sell your "2001 upgrade" at your next yard sale or put it on eBay.

Use the time you would have wasted trying to get 2001 working to spend
some quality time with your cat.

Seriously, why do you want to "upgrade?"
 
O

Orrie

You know, I can't remember why I bought the upgrade from QB 99 to QB 2001
now that it's been sitting on the shelf for two years unused. I'm a sole
proprietor, so the hot features that were introduced later to facilitate
group work, payrolls and such are of no interest to me.

QB 99 has a number of kinks that make it frustrating at times. I recall
thinking that QB 2001 would provide some relief. I'd hope it would work
better with Window XP as well. (I[ve been running QB 99 on my old Win98SE
computer.

Orrie
 
J

Jack Hatfield

99 is a good solid and the last of it's kind versions of QB.  What is it you don't like in it?  If you don't use PR then it does just about everything quicker and with no Intuit ads or service solicitations.  2001 works but doesn't do much 99 can't.  Neither can do Payroll tax calculations now because of their age.


Orrie wrote:


You know, I can't remember why I bought the upgrade from QB 99 to QB 2001 now that it's been sitting on the shelf for two years unused. I'm a sole proprietor, so the hot features that were introduced later to facilitate group work, payrolls and such are of no interest to me. QB 99 has a number of kinks that make it frustrating at times. I recall thinking that QB 2001 would provide some relief. I'd hope it would work better with Window XP as well. (I[ve been running QB 99 on my old Win98SE computer. Orrie "Winker" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...



Install QB Pro 99 on the new computer using the original key code and registration number. Then use a 3.5" to copy your data files over - they will have the more recent dates. Sell your "2001 upgrade" at your next yard sale or put it on eBay. Use the time you would have wasted trying to get 2001 working to spend some quality time with your cat. Seriously, why do you want to "upgrade?" Orrie wrote:



Hi, I have been using QB Pro 99 for years, but along the way, I bought an upgrade copy of 2001 and never got around to installing it. Now I have a



new



Win XP computer, and thought I'd install the copy of QB 2001 that has



just



been sitting on the shelf. My concern is about transfering my



registration



and customizing (toolbars, etc.) Should I just install the QB 2001, or should I install my old QB Pro 99



and



my data, then install QB 2001? Thanks. Orrie








-- Affordable Support Services .. No waiting for help. 660-949-2416 Northeastern Missouri
 
W

Winker

In July I did some work for a contractor who had just put his copy of QB
2002 back on the shelf (waited a full year to install it after he bought
it) and gone back to 99 Pro rather than spend all the time and trouble
of learning how to do everything all over just to get the same results.

A bit off topic but for the last two weeks I've been trying to
straighten out XP messes people have gotten themselves into. What added
functionality does XP bring to the average user? When it's not calling
home to tell Bill Gates what you are up to, it's telling you that you
need its permission AND a password you can't remember to look at the
recipe for stewed prunes your wife saved. And when the passwords get
screwed up...

We all do it. Just with different stuff.

Jack said:
99 is a good solid and the last of it's kind versions of QB. What is it
you don't like in it? If you don't use PR then it does just about
everything quicker and with no Intuit ads or service solicitations.
2001 works but doesn't do much 99 can't. Neither can do Payroll tax
calculations now because of their age.

You know, I can't remember why I bought the upgrade from QB 99 to QB 2001
now that it's been sitting on the shelf for two years unused. I'm a sole
proprietor, so the hot features that were introduced later to facilitate
group work, payrolls and such are of no interest to me.

QB 99 has a number of kinks that make it frustrating at times. I recall
thinking that QB 2001 would provide some relief. I'd hope it would work
better with Window XP as well. (I[ve been running QB 99 on my old Win98SE
computer.

Orrie


Install QB Pro 99 on the new computer using the original key code and
registration number. Then use a 3.5" to copy your data files over - they
will have the more recent dates.

Sell your "2001 upgrade" at your next yard sale or put it on eBay.

Use the time you would have wasted trying to get 2001 working to spend
some quality time with your cat.

Seriously, why do you want to "upgrade?"

Orrie wrote:



Hi,
I have been using QB Pro 99 for years, but along the way, I bought an
upgrade copy of 2001 and never got around to installing it. Now I have a

new


Win XP computer, and thought I'd install the copy of QB 2001 that has

just


been sitting on the shelf. My concern is about transfering my

registration


and customizing (toolbars, etc.)

Should I just install the QB 2001, or should I install my old QB Pro 99

and


my data, then install QB 2001?

Thanks.

Orrie
--
Affordable Support Services ..
No waiting for help.

660-949-2416
Northeastern Missouri
 
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A

Allan Martin

Winker said:
In July I did some work for a contractor who had just put his copy of QB
2002 back on the shelf (waited a full year to install it after he bought
it) and gone back to 99 Pro rather than spend all the time and trouble
of learning how to do everything all over just to get the same results.

A bit off topic but for the last two weeks I've been trying to
straighten out XP messes people have gotten themselves into. What added
functionality does XP bring to the average user? When it's not calling
home to tell Bill Gates what you are up to, it's telling you that you
need its permission AND a password you can't remember to look at the
recipe for stewed prunes your wife saved. And when the passwords get
screwed up...
If you have to ask what added functionality XP brings to the average user
then what the hell are you doing trying to help others with XP?
 
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