IRS mail to Germany


E

E. Tyler

I recently got in the mail in Germany a seemingly authentic USA IRS tax
form with a Kansas City MO return address. The form came in a
transparent, plastic bag with indicia that it had been mailed by:
"New Zealand No. 20211
Direct [small logo-like picture of an envelope]
PO Box 91-993
Auckland Mail Center
Auckland".

An Auckland business seems unlikely to have been involved in an American
tax form sent to Germany. There were no postmarks.

I mention the following envelope because it may shed light on the IRS
Auckland mailing. Today, there was postally delivered to my German
hosehould an envelope with an Ebglsih-language lotto gambling
advertisement from an Australian sender. There were no postmarks. An
envelope mailed in Australia and delivered in Germany normally has at
least one postmark. The advertisement was in English although it was
addressed to someone whose native language is not English.

I know little about how the USA's IRS sends mail to Germany. I guess,
perhaps wrongly, that the IRS form never was in New Zealand and that the
Auckland plastic bag somehow was improperly put in the mailstream of the
delivering post office. If my guess is right, this would not
necessarily mean that a postal employee had done anything wrong.

..
 
P

Paul Thomas

E. Tyler said:
I recently got in the mail in Germany a seemingly authentic USA IRS tax
form with a Kansas City MO return address. The form came in a
transparent, plastic bag with indicia that it had been mailed by:
"New Zealand No. 20211
Direct [small logo-like picture of an envelope]
PO Box 91-993
Auckland Mail Center
Auckland".

An Auckland business seems unlikely to have been involved in an American
tax form sent to Germany. There were no postmarks.

I mention the following envelope because it may shed light on the IRS
Auckland mailing. Today, there was postally delivered to my German
hosehould an envelope with an Ebglsih-language lotto gambling
advertisement from an Australian sender. There were no postmarks. An
envelope mailed in Australia and delivered in Germany normally has at
least one postmark. The advertisement was in English although it was
addressed to someone whose native language is not English.

I know little about how the USA's IRS sends mail to Germany. I guess,
perhaps wrongly, that the IRS form never was in New Zealand and that the
Auckland plastic bag somehow was improperly put in the mailstream of the
delivering post office. If my guess is right, this would not
necessarily mean that a postal employee had done anything wrong.




If you think you have an issue with the American IRS, contact them through
whatever numbers you find in your phone book or go to the internet and
search their website www.irs.gov


Do not call or mail the addresses on the letter/notice as they may not be
valid.
 
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C

Craig P.

.......................................................

I guess that the IRS mailed the form in a dark, paper envelope. In a
German post office, the envelope was obtained. Not necessarily in a
post office, the envelope was opened and the IRS contents examined. The
contents were then put in a plastic bag, the bag was sealed, and an
adhesive label of New Zealand's Direct company attached to the outside
of the bag. The plastic bag was returned to the post office, reached
the addressee, and has been carefully saved unopened by the addressee.
The IRS form inside may have the fingerprints of the culprit.

Why didn't the culprit just steal and never send anything?

I guess that a culprit in Germany wants the addressee to dismally know
that the addressee's mail, or at least his incoming foreign mail, is
read. I guess it's a coincidence that New Zealand rather than some
other country is involved.

Postal phishing is, as Paul suggests, possible. It is conceivable that
the form is fake and that the address to which the form should be sent
is really a phisher's address.
 
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C

Craig P.

E. Tyler said:
I recently got ...
---------------------------------------



I guess that the IRS mailed the form in a dark, paper envelope. In a
German post office, the envelope was obtained. Not necessarily in a
post office, the envelope was opened and the IRS contents examined. The
contents were then put in a plastic bag, the bag was sealed, and an
adhesive label of New Zealand's Direct company attached to the outside
of the bag. The plastic bag was returned to the post office, reached
the addressee, and has been carefully saved unopened by the addressee.
The IRS form inside may have the fingerprints of the culprit.

Why didn't the culprit just steal and never send anything?

I guess that a culprit in Germany wants the addressee to dismally know
that the addressee's mail, or at least his incoming foreign mail, is
read. I guess it's a coincidence that New Zealand rather than some
other country is involved.

Postal phishing is, as Paul suggests in his post, possible. It is
conceivable that the form is fake and that the address to which the form
should be sent is really a phisher's address.
 

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