Levels of staff?


B

bealoid

At my local council there appear to be three levels of staff:

1) People on the front desk
2) "Clerks" in the department
3) "Deciscion Makers" in the department

Thus, when I have a simple question it's answered by someone on the front
desk. When I have a more complex question (1) will ask (2) for me (I don't
get to ask myself) and either (2) will write a letter, or (1) will tell me.

When I have an even more complicated question it goes from (1) to (2), and
then from (2) to (3), who replies to (2), who then either writes to me, or
who replies to (1) who tells me.

Does that sound familiar? Could that be right?


Because it's causing me some problems. I think (1) are translating my
words into what they think I mean, and thus (2) are asking (3) the wrong
question.

Also, the replies from (3) can sometimes appear to be a tad rude, so (2)
'politen' them up a bit. That's nice, but it's tricky because I sometimes
end up not knowing what the real problem is.

So, uh, any advice?
 
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R

Robin T Cox

At my local council there appear to be three levels of staff:

1) People on the front desk
2) "Clerks" in the department
3) "Deciscion Makers" in the department

Thus, when I have a simple question it's answered by someone on the front
desk. When I have a more complex question (1) will ask (2) for me (I don't
get to ask myself) and either (2) will write a letter, or (1) will tell me.

When I have an even more complicated question it goes from (1) to (2), and
then from (2) to (3), who replies to (2), who then either writes to me, or
who replies to (1) who tells me.

Does that sound familiar? Could that be right?


Because it's causing me some problems. I think (1) are translating my
words into what they think I mean, and thus (2) are asking (3) the wrong
question.

Also, the replies from (3) can sometimes appear to be a tad rude, so (2)
'politen' them up a bit. That's nice, but it's tricky because I sometimes
end up not knowing what the real problem is.

So, uh, any advice?
Yes. Just treat all of them as human beings, and you may be surprised to
find that they treat you that way, too.
 
M

Mike

At my local council there appear to be three levels of staff:

1) People on the front desk
2) "Clerks" in the department
3) "Deciscion Makers" in the department

Thus, when I have a simple question it's answered by someone on the front
desk. When I have a more complex question (1) will ask (2) for me (I don't
get to ask myself) and either (2) will write a letter, or (1) will tell me.

When I have an even more complicated question it goes from (1) to (2), and
then from (2) to (3), who replies to (2), who then either writes to me, or
who replies to (1) who tells me.

Does that sound familiar? Could that be right?

Because it's causing me some problems. I think (1) are translating my
words into what they think I mean, and thus (2) are asking (3) the wrong
question.

Also, the replies from (3) can sometimes appear to be a tad rude, so (2)
'politen' them up a bit. That's nice, but it's tricky because I sometimes
end up not knowing what the real problem is.

So, uh, any advice?
Essentially that's the same as the DWP as well as many other large
companies whose business is dealing with the public.

The first people you see or phone first are the least trained, least
technically proficient. There are more of them and they tend to be
newer to the job.

In the DWP the DM will give a decision based on fact, or in the
absence of facts, balance of probability. This is not necessarily
diplomatic or suitable for public consumption as it will contain a lot
of jargon and phrases that members of the public will be unfamiliar
with. You can always send a letter of your own outlining your case
and providing info that hasn't been asked for.


There are/were two levels of decision maker. Any one who calculates
(processes) entitlement to benefits is making a decision and is
therefore a DM. There is/was a second layer of decision maker usually
the next grade up who deals with complex and judgement based decisions
such as habitual residence, living together as husband and wife and
self emp.earnings. This second teir of DM is being downgraded to
specially trained processors, in theory not a bad idea but they're
lack of training and pressure to clear the case will inevitably mean
less balanced decisions.

Mike
 
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