Missing 2000 Tax Return


L

Lilliew

I received a mail notice from the IRS yesterday that they
did not receive my tax return for 2000.

I know I filed mine that year, but due to moving/new job, I
no longer have the records from the filing, let along my
w2's etc. The companies I was working for during that tax
period no longer exist (yay dot.coms).

I know I didn't owe anything on that (or any returns for a
while), as I typically have extra taken out of my paycheck
to cover that. I typically get money back but I think that
year I broke even.

Any recommendations on how I should proceed?

Thanks in advance.

Lillie
(e-mail address removed)
 
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B

Barney Bird

Any recommendations on how I should proceed?

In order to prepare your 2000 tax return, you are going to
need that year's forms and copies of your 2000 Forms W-2.

You can download 2000 tax forms from the IRS website at:

http://www.irs.gov/formspubs/article/0,,id=98339,00.html

There is a recent discussion thread here on mtm that was
begun by Harlan Lunsford on July 7. The topic involves
whether or not local IRS walk-in offices will provide you
with copies of your 2000 Forms W-2 across the counter.
Walk-in offices in my area will but in other areas they may
not. If they decline to print them out while you wait, I
assume they will offer to mail the Forms W-2 to you. Either
way, IRS does not charge a fee for providing copies of prior
year Forms W-2.

You can find locations and addresses of IRS walk-in offices
at the url below:

http://www.irs.gov/localcontacts/index.html

I recommend you visit your local walk-in office. Make sure
you take some picture ID and your copy of the notice. Ask
the IRS customer service reps to look up your 2000 Forms W-2
and print them out for you. Assuming they are willing to
provide you with the W-2s johnny-on-the-spot, you might
consider coming prepared with blank 2000 tax forms,
something to write with, and a pocket calculator. That way
you could prepare the return in the office and ask them to
file it for you.

Gook luck.

Barney Byrd
(e-mail address removed)

To contact me directly, use the correct spelling of my last
name in the e-mail address above.
 
H

Harlan Lunsford

Lilliew said:
I received a mail notice from the IRS yesterday that they
did not receive my tax return for 2000.

I know I filed mine that year, but due to moving/new job, I
no longer have the records from the filing, let along my
w2's etc. The companies I was working for during that tax
period no longer exist (yay dot.coms).

I know I didn't owe anything on that (or any returns for a
while), as I typically have extra taken out of my paycheck
to cover that. I typically get money back but I think that
year I broke even.

Any recommendations on how I should proceed?
First thing to do, is check your bank records for either a
deposit of a tax refund somewhere in first six months of
2001, OR a check for any balance due. But surely you must
recall whether or not you owed or were due a refund.

If you had someone else prepare your return (for
compensation that is) he might be able to produce a copy for
you, although he does not have to keep a copy of the return.
With most done on computers these days, though, it will be a
simple task to print another.

Also write back to IRS and ask them to send you reprints of
any W-2's, and 1099's for that year. IF you only used the
standard deduction, you may be able to reconstruct your tax
return for that year.

Or you might want to obtain local tax help, either an EA or
a CPA. I can find one of the former for you if that is the
route you wish to take.

Cheer$,
Harlan Lunsford, EA in LA
 
W

Wayne Brasch

Lilliew said:
I received a mail notice from the IRS yesterday that they
did not receive my tax return for 2000.

I know I filed mine that year, but due to moving/new job, I
no longer have the records from the filing, let along my
w2's etc. The companies I was working for during that tax
period no longer exist (yay dot.coms).

I know I didn't owe anything on that (or any returns for a
while), as I typically have extra taken out of my paycheck
to cover that. I typically get money back but I think that
year I broke even.

Any recommendations on how I should proceed?
Did you prepare them yourself? If not, the tax preparer,
by law, must keep a copy of your return for that year.

Wayne Brasch, CPA, M. S. Taxation
 
M

Michael T Wing CPA

Wayne Brasch said:
If not, the tax preparer,
by law, must keep a copy of your return for that year.
I'm not sure that's correct. I believe the preparer is only
required to keep a "record" of the fact that a return was
prepared for a particular taxpayer, but he need not keep a
copy of the return itself.

Different rules ~might~ apply if the return was efiled,
but the original post didn't mention that.

MTW
 
A

Arthur Kamlet

Did you prepare them yourself? If not, the tax preparer,
by law, must keep a copy of your return for that year.
I prepare quite a few tax returns for VITA and AARP/TaxAide
each year and both VITA and TaxAide prohibit volunteers or
anyone else in their organization from saving taxpayer
information once the IRS has accepted the return, or
taxpayer has been given the paper return.

__
Art Kamlet ArtKamlet @ AOL.com Columbus OH K2PZH
 
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M

Michael T Wing CPA

Arthur Kamlet said:
I prepare quite a few tax returns for VITA and AARP/TaxAide
each year and both VITA and TaxAide prohibit volunteers or
anyone else in their organization from saving taxpayer
information once the IRS has accepted the return, or
taxpayer has been given the paper return.
If I'm not mistaken, VITA (and similar) volunteers are not
considered to be "paid preparers." The rules for said
volunteers appear to be unique to those programs and differ
from the rules applicable to paid preparers.

MTW
 
H

Harlan Lunsford

I'm not sure that's correct. I believe the preparer is only
required to keep a "record" of the fact that a return was
prepared for a particular taxpayer, but he need not keep a
copy of the return itself.

Different rules ~might~ apply if the return was efiled,
but the original post didn't mention that.
You are quite correct, Mike, as I also mentioned. The law
requires one to keep a copy of the returns filed, OR a list
of taxpayers with ID #'s.

Cheer$,
Harlan Lunsford, EA in LA
 
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M

Michael T Wing CPA

They are: Add Form 8453 and the W-2's (at a minimum).
The W-2 requirement is especially curious since the ERO in
all likelihood did NOT prepare the form. Meanwhile, a (third
party) practitioner who actually DID prepare the form likely
isn't required to retain a copy of it.

Go figure...

MTW
 

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