National Insurance...


R

Ronald Raygun

Marcus said:
Just had a letter from the IR, says I've underpaid NI for the tax year
2001-2002. 18 weeks @ £6.75. I was a student up until July 2001 and then I
was on JSA until Jan 2002. From then on I worked, earning approx. £65 per
week. Where does the shortfall come from?
They should have said. At a guess, it could be that if you wish
2001-02 to qualify towards your pension entitlement, it might be
necessary for you to volunteer to make Class 3 contributions for
the tail end of your student time, i.e. from April 2001 until your
JSA started.
 
Ad

Advertisements

M

Marcus Fox

Just had a letter from the IR, says I've underpaid NI for the tax year
2001-2002. 18 weeks @ £6.75. I was a student up until July 2001 and then I
was on JSA until Jan 2002. From then on I worked, earning approx. £65 per
week. Where does the shortfall come from?

Marcus
 
D

D.A.L.

They should have said. At a guess, it could be that if you wish
2001-02 to qualify towards your pension entitlement, it might be
necessary for you to volunteer to make Class 3 contributions for
the tail end of your student time, i.e. from April 2001 until your
JSA started.
Or if you're likely (or expecting) to have 42 (or is it 43?) years of
continuous NI payments until you retire, then I wouldn't worry about it.
 
G

GSV Three Minds in a Can

Bitstring <[email protected]>, from the
wonderful person Richard Buttrey
44 years IIRC.
Indeed ... 44 is the answer last time I looked. However you can have a
'gimme' for the last 5 years if you are male, over 60, and not working,
so you only need pay 39 (before age 60).
 
D

derek *

Indeed ... 44 is the answer last time I looked. However you can have a
'gimme' for the last 5 years if you are male, over 60, and not working,
so you only need pay 39 (before age 60).
Cela m' semble "A bit rough".

I am 57 now, but was at Uni 'till I was 22. I have been employed
constantly ever since so currently have 35 years contributions under
my belt. So it appears I need to work another 9 years, but for the
"Gimme Rule".

Do I take it then I have to work at least until I'm 60 when I'll have
38 years contributions. But I'll need 39 to have a full contribution
record. So what about the missing 1 years contributions? Can I work
'till I'm 61 and then claim 5 "Gimme" years or what.

It appears that a weary man in his '60s gains little or nothing by
continuing to work and pay NI contributions between 60 and 65 or have
I got it wrong.

DG
 
G

GSV Three Minds in a Can

from the said:
Cela m' semble "A bit rough".

I am 57 now, but was at Uni 'till I was 22. I have been employed
constantly ever since so currently have 35 years contributions under
my belt. So it appears I need to work another 9 years, but for the
"Gimme Rule".

Do I take it then I have to work at least until I'm 60 when I'll have
38 years contributions. But I'll need 39 to have a full contribution
record. So what about the missing 1 years contributions? Can I work
'till I'm 61 and then claim 5 "Gimme" years or what.

It appears that a weary man in his '60s gains little or nothing by
continuing to work and pay NI contributions between 60 and 65 or have
I got it wrong.
Well, you presumably get a salary. And continue to gain a company
pension.

But as far as state pension goes, yep, you might as well quit at 60. For
exact details of your particular case, get a forecast form (BR19 maybe?
There is a PDF file of it online somewhere) and send it off to the folks
in Newcastle, who will be delighted to tell you what you are going to
get and whether you can do anything to improve it.

Whether you are really missing 1 year is not entirely clear - you may
have been credited for your time in full time education, and I can never
keep straight where your 60th birthday has to be in relation to the tax
year(s) .. best to ask for a forecast.
 
Ad

Advertisements

U

usenet

derek * said:
Cela m' semble "A bit rough".

I am 57 now, but was at Uni 'till I was 22. I have been employed
constantly ever since so currently have 35 years contributions under
my belt. So it appears I need to work another 9 years, but for the
"Gimme Rule".

Do I take it then I have to work at least until I'm 60 when I'll have
38 years contributions. But I'll need 39 to have a full contribution
record. So what about the missing 1 years contributions? Can I work
'till I'm 61 and then claim 5 "Gimme" years or what.

It appears that a weary man in his '60s gains little or nothing by
continuing to work and pay NI contributions between 60 and 65 or have
I got it wrong.
Don't you get contributions 'credits' for your university years?
 
D

derek *

Don't you get contributions 'credits' for your university years?
I thought not, Students used to (still do?) get a letter from the DWP
inviting them to make up the shortfall during their first year at
work. IIRC the shortfall had to be made up within 4 years.

I thought at the time that the state old age pension was not affected
only secondary benefits such as widows pensions. Being broke, 22, and
single nobody took the prospect of leaving widows behind very
seriously.

However it's possible I got credits whilst in the 5th and 6th form
which would do the trick. It was normal to leave school and start work
at 15 in those days

DG
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Similar Threads

national insurance 30
National Insurance 3
National insurance 2
National Insurance Numbers 15
National Insurance Number 2
National Insurance Number 9
National Insurance Contributions 7
National Insurance arrears. 3

Top