Need some clarification concerning disability benefits qualification


R

Rod

This is somewhat of a complicated situation, which I really
cannot go fully into right now. However here is as much as
I can give now. Our oldest son has had problems for a long
time, but we have never, until very recently, had any idea
as to what to do for him. We have learned about something
called Asperger Syndrome, which is a form of autism. It is
a high functioning form of autism, but even so he may never
be a fully functioning member of society.

This has brought up the prospect of disability benefits
which he might qualify for. However, we've also heard that
he must be diagnosed from a professional, that he really
does have Asperger Syndrome (or some other form of autism)
before he turns 22, in order to qualify for assistance. But
I've also heard from other people that this isn't necessary.

I'm really confused. What's the truth, please?

Rod
 
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D

DORFMONT

I know several young men with Asperger's Syndrome and they
are not as dysfunctional as you describe your son. I
recommend having him diagnosed by a professional familiar
with the various levels of autism. Then using this you can
look into disability benefits. My Aspie friends are a little
weird but great students and may be headed toward careers in
research or other work which does not require a lot of
contact with the public. My former computer consultant was
an Aspie and I didn=92t realize it until one of my friends
who also used his services pointed it out. Aspies can be
productive members of society.

Linda Dorfmont E.A., CFP, CSA
 
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P

Phil Marti

Rod said:
Our oldest son has had problems for a long
time, but we have never, until very recently, had any idea
as to what to do for him. We have learned about something
called Asperger Syndrome, which is a form of autism. It is
a high functioning form of autism, but even so he may never
be a fully functioning member of society.

This has brought up the prospect of disability benefits
which he might qualify for. However, we've also heard that
he must be diagnosed from a professional, that he really
does have Asperger Syndrome (or some other form of autism)
before he turns 22, in order to qualify for assistance. But
I've also heard from other people that this isn't necessary.

I'm really confused. What's the truth, please?
It sounds like you're talking about SSI benefits, which are
not part of tax law. You need to find a Social Security
benefits lawyer.
 
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B

Bob Sandler

This has brought up the prospect of disability benefits
which he might qualify for. However, we've also heard that
he must be diagnosed from a professional, that he really
does have Asperger Syndrome (or some other form of autism)
before he turns 22, in order to qualify for assistance. But
I've also heard from other people that this isn't necessary.

I'm really confused. What's the truth, please?
This is a tax forum. You do not appear to have a question
about taxes. You should pose your question to whatever
entity (government agency, insurance company, etc.) pays the
disability benefit that you are trying to get. Most likely
there isn't one uniform rule for all disability coverages,
which may be why you are getting different stories. The
answer will depend on the rules for the particular source of
disability benefits that you are dealing with.
 
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R

Rod

Phil Marti said:
It sounds like you're talking about SSI benefits, which are
not part of tax law. You need to find a Social Security
benefits lawyer.
It is not a part of tax law? I thought it was. Thank you
for your advise concerning asking a SS benefits lawyer, I
will look into it.

Rod
 
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D

David Woods, EA, ChFC, CLU

It is not a part of tax law? I thought it was. Thank you
for your advise concerning asking a SS benefits lawyer, I
will look into it.
SSI has absolutely NOTHING to do with tax law.
 
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**THE-RFI-EMI-GUY**

Except that it is a TAX and it is a LAW!!
SSI has absolutely NOTHING to do with tax law.
--
Joe Leikhim K4SAT
"The RFI-EMI-GUY"

The Lost Deep Thoughts By: Jack Handey
Before a mad scientist goes mad, there's probably a time
when he's only partially mad. And this is the time when
he's going to throw his best parties.
 
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