New to the newsgroup, trying to fix bad data


G

Gary H. Lucas

Hello,
I am new to this newsgroup, however I have used QuickBooks in past jobs, and
started with Quicken V1 in my own company back in the 80s.

Our company switched to QuickBooks at the beginning of this year. The
operations manager was pissed at me for six months because at the end of
year meeting before moving to QuickBooks, I said they was going to screw it
up. Well they screwed it up, bad. They allowed people who have no idea
what a part is, invent part numbers and enter descriptions and other data
for more than 3,000 parts. None of the users had ever used QuickBooks
before and they got only cursory training in how QuickBooks works, not in
how we should be using it. It's funny how GIGO (Garbage In = Garbage out)
is still true 28 years after I bought my first computer!

We getting ready to implement AllOrders by NumberCruncher, which should have
been implemented along side QuickBooks right from the start. About a month
ago the owner came to me and said he realized he made a big mistake not
turning the task over to me last year, and I've been tasked with fixing it.

I exported all the item data to an Excel file and I have been working at
correcting all the data. Fixing the descriptions is a huge job, but as I've
been doing that I have become painfully aware that I may have to also fix
hundreds of item numbers. Everyone is hoping I can pull this off without
starting over with a new QuickBooks file. For me that hope is fading fast.
So I am trying to figure out the best path. I'd really like to not have
tons of garbage left in our system from the initial bad start.

My preference would be to export all the data I can from the current version
of QuickBooks, then import all the cleaned up data back into a fresh new
file. I would then like to carry all current balances forward, and possibly
reenter all open POs and Invoices, because some of them may have parts that
got new item numbers. Can anyone suggest how much data I might be able to
recover and clean up this way?

I also need help with how to use QuickBooks properly. The last time I used
was about 5 years ago, my needs then were simple, and I am no accountant
(I'm in engineering). I think I'm the right person for the task though, as
I have set up these types of systems 3 times in the past, and even wrote
accounting and manufacturing software in the early DOS days.

We are a company that manufactures large skids of waste water treatment
equipment. We also install them, making us a contractor as well, and employ
subcontractors. We also own, install and operate systems as a contract
service. The people in accounting have been creating lots of items to
pre-record things they bill customers for on a regular basis. I believe
they may be doing this the wrong way, and that QuickBooks Premier may have
better tools for what we are doing.

Over the next couple of weeks I hope to ask some of you here for your
opinions on how to do some of these tasks as I identify them. I know I can
call tech support, and cost is not the issue, but I feel that people who
actually USE the product frequently have better advice.

I am also VERY interested in speaking with anyone currently using AllOrders
by NumberCruncher! I have ideas on our workflow that I'd like to discuss
with users.

Best Regards,

Gary H. Lucas
 
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H

HeyBub

Gary said:
Hello,
I am new to this newsgroup, however I have used QuickBooks in past
jobs, and started with Quicken V1 in my own company back in the 80s.

Our company switched to QuickBooks at the beginning of this year. The
operations manager was pissed at me for six months because at the end
of year meeting before moving to QuickBooks, I said they was going to
screw it up. Well they screwed it up, bad. They allowed people who
have no idea what a part is, invent part numbers and enter
descriptions and other data for more than 3,000 parts. None of the
users had ever used QuickBooks before and they got only cursory
training in how QuickBooks works, not in how we should be using it. It's
funny how GIGO (Garbage In = Garbage out) is still true 28 years
after I bought my first computer!
We getting ready to implement AllOrders by NumberCruncher, which
should have been implemented along side QuickBooks right from the
start. About a month ago the owner came to me and said he realized
he made a big mistake not turning the task over to me last year, and
I've been tasked with fixing it.
I exported all the item data to an Excel file and I have been working
at correcting all the data. Fixing the descriptions is a huge job,
but as I've been doing that I have become painfully aware that I may
have to also fix hundreds of item numbers. Everyone is hoping I can
pull this off without starting over with a new QuickBooks file. For
me that hope is fading fast. So I am trying to figure out the best
path. I'd really like to not have tons of garbage left in our system
from the initial bad start.
My preference would be to export all the data I can from the current
version of QuickBooks, then import all the cleaned up data back into
a fresh new file. I would then like to carry all current balances
forward, and possibly reenter all open POs and Invoices, because some
of them may have parts that got new item numbers. Can anyone suggest
how much data I might be able to recover and clean up this way?

I also need help with how to use QuickBooks properly. The last time
I used was about 5 years ago, my needs then were simple, and I am no
accountant (I'm in engineering). I think I'm the right person for
the task though, as I have set up these types of systems 3 times in
the past, and even wrote accounting and manufacturing software in the
early DOS days.
We are a company that manufactures large skids of waste water
treatment equipment. We also install them, making us a contractor as
well, and employ subcontractors. We also own, install and operate
systems as a contract service. The people in accounting have been
creating lots of items to pre-record things they bill customers for
on a regular basis. I believe they may be doing this the wrong way,
and that QuickBooks Premier may have better tools for what we are
doing.
Over the next couple of weeks I hope to ask some of you here for your
opinions on how to do some of these tasks as I identify them. I know
I can call tech support, and cost is not the issue, but I feel that
people who actually USE the product frequently have better advice.

I am also VERY interested in speaking with anyone currently using
AllOrders by NumberCruncher! I have ideas on our workflow that I'd
like to discuss with users.
Bring in a QB expert (you can get local names from the QB website) NOW.

You've set up three QB sessions; the QB pro will have set up hundreds.
You're an engineer; the QB pro is likely a CPA or accounting whiz.

You've got forklifts at your plant. I don't doubt you could change a flat
tire, but would you want to tackle an engine rebuild?
 
G

Gary H. Lucas

HeyBub said:
Bring in a QB expert (you can get local names from the QB website) NOW.

You've set up three QB sessions; the QB pro will have set up hundreds.
You're an engineer; the QB pro is likely a CPA or accounting whiz.

You've got forklifts at your plant. I don't doubt you could change a flat
tire, but would you want to tackle an engine rebuild?
Well, I once rebuilt a hydraulic truck crane and had the factory ask me if
I'd like to become an authorized repair facility, so yeah I'd give the
engine rebuild a shot!

We hired a supposedly expert QB Var to set up our new server, install QB and
train our users. We still got in trouble. This could be because the VAR
didn't take the time to learn anything about what we do, so they could point
us in the right direction. It could also be because our management asked
them to do as little as possible (likely). I was instrumental in getting
the company to choose QuickBooks, because as accounting goes, it really is
all we need. However I was not invited to the training sessions. Now I am
tasked with fixing it. I know enough to know I need help, which is why I am
here.

There is a saying "You don't go to war with the army you want, you go with
the one you've got."

I have another issue with bringing in experts. How to choose an expert. I
am reminded of when I was an electrician, in my first career. Someone would
tell me that so and so was a great electrician, then I'd meet them or get
good look at their work and know that wasn't true. To the unskilled person
they looked good. I feel the same way about doctor recommendations, are you
qualified to judge? I find that hanging around newsgroups for a while it
doesn't take too long to recognize true experts, and the posers. So I
frequently use them for help, and return the favor whenever I can.

Gary H. Lucas
 
G

Gary H. Lucas

Our QB users have set up lots of items for the purpose of using them for
recurring charges on contract service jobs. On these jobs we bill a monthly
minumum for the first X gallons, Y for the next 100,000 gallons, and Z for
the gallons above that. The first two numbers are constants and the last
number is just quick multiplication.

Is this a good way to do it? Would a simple memorized transaction for the
invoice and change the Z value be a better way?

Thanks,

Gary H. Lucas
 
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H

HeyBub

Gary said:
There is a saying "You don't go to war with the army you want, you go
with the one you've got."
Heh! Good point. Most wars in history, however, have been fought by
mercenaries.
 

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