no 1099-misc


G

George

I am self-employed. Most of my business income ($25K last
year) comes from in-home work for one out-of-state company.
Last year, I did some work (mostly in-home) for a local
contractor, for which I was paid $1K. I want to count this
as business income (which it is), put it on my schedule-SE,
etc.

The problem is that this contractor would rather not issue a
1099, because then I'd appear as contract labor, for which
he'd have to pay workers' comp. I'd like to maintain a good
relationship with this guy, but still be straight with the
IRS.

Can I just file my schedules C and SE showing my total
business income, without a supporting 1099 for his part? If
it matters, I'm going to file electronically.

George
 
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C

clj1219

You are required to report all your income, whether it is
reported on a 1099 or not. Since you don't have to attach a
1099 to your return, unless there is tax withheld, there
should be no problem with you "reporting" something you're
supposed to report anyway.

In case he were audited, he might have difficulty claiming
what he paid you as a business expense if he did not issue a
1099.
 
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S

San Diego CPA

George said:
I am self-employed. Most of my business income ($25K last
year) comes from in-home work for one out-of-state company.
Last year, I did some work (mostly in-home) for a local
contractor, for which I was paid $1K. I want to count this
as business income (which it is), put it on my schedule-SE,
etc.

The problem is that this contractor would rather not issue a
1099, because then I'd appear as contract labor, for which
he'd have to pay workers' comp. I'd like to maintain a good
relationship with this guy, but still be straight with the
IRS.

Can I just file my schedules C and SE showing my total
business income, without a supporting 1099 for his part? If
it matters, I'm going to file electronically.
There's no problem if gross income on your Schedule C is
greater than the total of the 1099's you received. Claim
the income as part of your Sch C gross receipts.
 
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C

cirills

There's no problem if gross income on your Schedule C is
greater than the total of the 1099's you received. Claim
the income as part of your Sch C gross receipts.
My problem is that a contractor that used to pay in me
1099's switched to a W-2 this year citing audit problems.
Yet, I AM self-employed.

Can I still file me expenses on Schedule C (like my
cell-phone used for business, ink for my printer, etc.) that
I have always filed, even though I no longer have any 1099
income.

It would seem unfair not to be able to.

Help, please!
 
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