nominal


R

Ron k

Hi

I want to withdraw som emoney from my business and use it to pay off some of
my mortgage.

How would I show this movement in Sage line 5o

regards

Ron
 
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T

troysteadman

DoobieDo said:
Please ignore our resident nincompoop. How was Magaluf Doobie?

There are plenty of people here who can help you with Sage Line 50 (not
me). Presumably you are asking what is the double entry?

SOLE TRADER
CR Bank
DR Drawings

LTD COMPANY
CR Bank
DR Directors Loan A/C

If the latter then there are several things to think about:
1) Is my Directors Loan A/C overdrawn?
2) Should the Co be paying me a salary to utilise my nil rate band?

....and so on.
 
K

Keith

Ron k said:
Hi

I want to withdraw som emoney from my business and use it to pay off some of
my mortgage.

How would I show this movement in Sage line 5o
Credit the bank account (Balance Sheet)
Debit a 'loan' account. (Balance Sheet)

Use the 'Bank Payment' routine.

Then discuss with your accountant how to legitimise it out of dividends.
 
K

Keith

There are plenty of people here who can help you with Sage Line 50 (not
me).
Should you not do OP's a favour and keep your advice to areas where you
*are* competent ?
 
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T

troysteadman

Keith said:
Should you not do OP's a favour and keep your advice to areas where you
*are* competent ?
OP is redirected to a Sage forum by Dopey, I point out this is a
suitable group to pose a Sage question although I personally cannot
answer it.

What's your problem Keith?

"Should you not do OP's a favour..."? That apostrophe to denote a
plural is illiterate according to Martin.
 
T

Tim

"Should you not do OP's a favour..."? That apostrophe
to denote a plural is illiterate according to Martin.
That one doesn't denote a plural!
 
T

Tim

Huh? Is it a possessive Tim? Something belonging to the OP?
Well, as apostrophes don't denote plurals (they denote either possession or
missing letters), then it must be referring to the possession of the
"favour" of the OP...
 
T

troysteadman

Tim said:
Well, as apostrophes don't denote plurals (they denote either possession or
missing letters), then it must be referring to the possession of the
"favour" of the OP...
Ah but that is where you and Martin are wrong Tim and where me and
Keith...sorry Keith and I...are correct. You don't dot your is and
cross your as, instead you mind your p's and q's.

"10 ops in an 'ospital"
"10 OP's in a newsgroup"

We had this out a day or two ago:

Raymond S. Wise wrote:
Jonathan said:
(e-mail address removed) wrote:
Yes, among people who can't write in English properly.
Try searching for "grocer's apostrophe"
I know that as the "greengrocer's apostrophe."

But "0's" and "1's" are emphatically *not* examples of the
greengrocer's apostophe. It was once a standard way of pluralizing
letters, numbers, symbols, and abbreviations ("three Ph.D.'s" and "two
G.I.'s," for example) in both British and American usage. I was taught
it here in the US when I was a student, and it is still thoroughly
standard usage in American English.

See
http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2005/06/19/weekinreview/20050619_BU...


for a current example of "G.I.'s" used by the *New York Times.*
 
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T

Tim

We had this out a day or two ago: ...
Yes, when you appeared to have *lost* the argument!

<QUOTE>
I was taught it here in the US when I was a student, and
it is still thoroughly standard usage in American English.
</QUOTE>
We all know that Americans can't speak English - and especially not spell
it!
 
D

DoobieDo

There doesn't seem to be an area where Troll *is* competent... it joins
in everywhere and deviates from the subject matter prattling on about,
for instance, the use of apostrophies...
OP is redirected to a Sage forum by Dopey, I point out this is a
suitable group to pose a Sage question although I personally cannot
answer it.
http://www.usenet.org.uk/uk.business.accountancy.html includes:

<quote>
However the following are not appropriate in this group:

Discussion of implementation/usage of computers or accounting software;
<unquote>


Which part of the above is beyond your comprehension Troll?

Keep in touch with yourself.
 
T

troysteadman

Tim said:
Yes, when you appeared to have *lost* the argument!



We all know that Americans can't speak English - and especially not spell
it!
Do a Google on MP's Tim and ask yourself which team you rather play
for:

Me, Keith

or

You, Dopey, Martin, Jonathan Bryce.

"The fewer men, the greater share of honour.
God's will! I pray thee, wish not one man more."
 
R

Ronald Raygun

Do a Google on MP's Tim
What's your point?
Darned if I know what an MP's Tim is. Some kind of Boy-Friday?

Anyway, I get more than 10 times as many hits for "MPs Tim" as
for "MP's Tim". Likewise for "MPs" vs "MP's".

So engrave that on your apostrophy.
 
T

troysteadman

Ronald said:
What's your point?
Darned if I know what an MP's Tim is. Some kind of Boy-Friday?

Anyway, I get more than 10 times as many hits for "MPs Tim" as
for "MP's Tim". Likewise for "MPs" vs "MP's".

So engrave that on your apostrophy.
apostrophy?

You'll feel more at home in the other team Ronald. Like Jackson at 2nd
Manassas I have Longstreet in the bushes. Let's start with the infantry
and leave the cavalry till later:

Dagenham: http://tinyurl.com/deb4z
Darlington: http://tinyurl.com/8tqch
Dorset: http://tinyurl.com/ady7t

....that's enough D's.
 
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R

Ronald Raygun

apostrophy?
You keep mentioning teams, so I guess this is some kind of game, with
prizes/trophies. Actually, it was a reference to an earlier post in
which your good friend used the word "apostrophies".
Dagenham: Darlington: Dorset:

...that's enough D's.
Ds.

Thanks for the Dagenham example. Jolly fair of you.

Unless I've miscounted, it contains two occurrences of "MP's", only one of
which is a plural. It seems likely that the page's author would view this
as a mistake, given that the same page contains four occurrences of "MPs".

I remain, as ever, you're humble servant, etc.
 
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troysteadman

Ronald said:
You keep mentioning teams, so I guess this is some kind of game, with
prizes/trophies. Actually, it was a reference to an earlier post in
which your good friend used the word "apostrophies".
I assumed you'd slipped into the new...old Scottish vernacular that the
Americans seem to think is an authentic language:
...Scots is a sister language to
English: I'm not talking about the standard dialect of English taught
in schools in Scotland, which is indeed a version of English, nor am I
talking about Gaelic, but about the language described at

http://www.scots-online.org/>
Thanks for the Dagenham example. Jolly fair of you.

Unless I've miscounted, it contains two occurrences of "MP's", only one of
which is a plural. It seems likely that the page's author would view this
as a mistake, given that the same page contains four occurrences of "MPs".

I remain, as ever, you're humble servant, etc.[/QUOTE]

I'm not suggesting for one minute that "MPs" is wrong.

National Union of Journalists:

"...she can explain to Yorkshire MP's..."

http://www.nuj.org.uk/inner.php?docid=982
 

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