PCS dispute


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M

mart2306

Any news on the PCS dispute?

Nothing on the news recently.
Which dispute?
Seems like there are several a year reported in the press.

Martin <><
 
M

Mike

Mr said:
Any news on the PCS dispute?

Nothing on the news recently.
The PCS are trying to get management to invoke the review clause in the
settlement imposed last summer as inflation has exceeded expectations.
Last I heard management were going back to treasury. If that doesn't
result in new money and fresh negotiations then I'm sure there will be
more strike action.

Mike
 
M

Mr Mo

as inflation has exceeded expectations.

RPI is about 4%.

But realistically inflation is 6%

I'd be disappointed with less than 5% if I worked for DWP

Incidentally, I saw a job advertised for the JCP yesterday - 14.2k...
yuk!
 
M

mart2306

The PCS are trying to get management to invoke the review clause in the
settlement imposed last summer as inflation has exceeded expectations.
Last I heard management were going back to treasury.  If that doesn't
result in new money and fresh negotiations then I'm sure there will be
more strike action.

Mike
And if the treasury turn round and say, you don't like the pay award
then we won't give it you (as they did back in 1992 for a while to one
civil service union), what then?

Civil service tends to get low pay rises, no matter how much they
strike or how they bitch and moan.
Simplest solution if disagreeing with pay is to get a job elsewhere.
But not every organisation has an annual pay rise even.
Seems like trying to hold the treasury to ransom in this economy is a
tough job. Alongside annual budget cuts for many departments.

Can't say I notice much when strike action occurs, apart from a few
more free spaces on our car park (local DWP office shares our car
park).
Ah well, more chance perhaps of the third sector or A4e taking on more
work if civil service won't do it.

Martin <><
 
M

mart2306

RPI is about 4%.

But realistically inflation is 6%

I'd be disappointed with less than 5% if I worked for DWP

Incidentally, I saw a job advertised for the JCP yesterday - 14.2k...
yuk!
Hmmm....£14.2k isn't too bad for unskilled work.
And its indoor work with no heavy lifting. :)
 
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M

Mike

Mr said:
RPI is about 4%.

But realistically inflation is 6%

I'd be disappointed with less than 5% if I worked for DWP

Incidentally, I saw a job advertised for the JCP yesterday - 14.2k...
yuk!
That'd be AO starting pay, pretty yukky.

For those not on the max of there scale the pay rise is pretty decent, I
get just over 5%, but next year it's about 1.5% as I hit max. Those on
max get 0% - essentially a pay cut of over 4%.

It doesn't do the DWP any favour as most people who join leave inside
18mths so the cost of training etc is horrendous. Turnover is probably
averaging about 20% pa and in some areas much much higher. My office
recruits about 80 staff a year to maintain a 'headcount' of approx 330.
Bearing in mind some of those 330 are on maternity, career breaks and
long term sick that would put the turnover of working staff at approx 30%.

I read in some DWP HR publication approx 10 years ago that the cost of
recruiting, training and paying a processor for the first year was 35k.
Training has gotten cheaper but recruitment/HR is a lot more expensive
factoring in inflation that 35k has probably gone up but even at 35k
that's a lot of wasted money for one very small office. Across the
pension service alone that multiplies up to over £50m, JCP is probably
worse and is much bigger.

Much of that could be saved if they gave all staff a pay rise that met
inflation and paid some attention to job satisfaction.

Mike
 
M

mart2306

That'd be AO starting pay, pretty yukky.

For those not on the max of there scale the pay rise is pretty decent, I
get just over 5%, but next year it's about 1.5% as I hit max.  Those on
max get 0% - essentially a pay cut of over 4%.

It doesn't do the DWP any favour as most people who join leave inside
18mths so the cost of training etc is horrendous.  Turnover is probably
averaging about 20% pa and in some areas much much higher.  My office
recruits about 80 staff a year to maintain a 'headcount' of approx 330.
  Bearing in mind some of those 330 are on maternity, career breaks and
long term sick that would put the turnover of working staff at approx 30%.

I read in some DWP HR publication approx 10 years ago that the cost of
recruiting, training and paying a processor for the first year was 35k.
  Training has gotten cheaper but recruitment/HR is a lot more expensive
factoring in inflation that 35k has probably gone up but even at 35k
that's a lot of wasted money for one very small office.  Across the
pension service alone that multiplies up to over £50m, JCP is probably
worse and is much bigger.

Much of that could be saved if they gave all staff a pay rise that met
inflation and paid some attention to job satisfaction.

Mike
True, a load of money could be saved by keeping staff in the job.
Not sure the senior management would think like that though. My
experience with some of the top bods has been they are so far removed
from reality on the 'shop floor' that they haven't a clue.
Seeing that claims processing is 927 for last month in no way gives an
idea of whats involved in real terms, what conditions are like and so
on.

I wish the staff luck in getting a pay deal. Just not expecting
anything much.

Years ago when we had a box marking (with most staff being box 3 and
therefore good but not excellent), one of the local union reps argued
that he wasn't a really good '3', he was the crappest '2' they'd ever
seen. A '2' box marking being worth more money in the pay rise at the
time.
There was no financial difference between a really crap and a really
good worker with the same number. :)

Hey, come to think of it. Civil servants tend to work fairly fixed
hours (mon-fri, between this and that time). Leaves plenty of scope
for 2nd or 3rd jobs.
One of my old mates used to be a bouncer by night. I was a nurse for a
time. My sister works weekends at a bookshop.
All extra money - and tends to be higher pay rises than civil service.

Martin <><
 
M

Mike

And if the treasury turn round and say, you don't like the pay award
then we won't give it you (as they did back in 1992 for a while to one
civil service union), what then?

Civil service tends to get low pay rises, no matter how much they
strike or how they bitch and moan.
Simplest solution if disagreeing with pay is to get a job elsewhere.
But not every organisation has an annual pay rise even.
Seems like trying to hold the treasury to ransom in this economy is a
tough job. Alongside annual budget cuts for many departments.

Can't say I notice much when strike action occurs, apart from a few
more free spaces on our car park (local DWP office shares our car
park).
Ah well, more chance perhaps of the third sector or A4e taking on more
work if civil service won't do it.

Martin <><
And many are - personally I look forward to compulsory redundancy!!

MIke
 
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M

mart2306

And many are - personally I look forward to compulsory redundancy!!

MIke- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
Ah yes, the civil service has far more generous redundancy terms as I
recall than the rest of us.
And unlike everyone else, unlikely they'd ever go bankrupt.

Martin <><
 

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