People In Profit System (PIPS)


M

Martin Davies

Mike said:
Yes, of course, no problem at all. Just send the two million to
PayPal account 1234567890987654321 and it's guaranteed to be with you
on time. I need the money up front to pay the dismantlers. I'm sure
you understand.

And at no extra charge, I'll enter you into the Spanish lottery. I'm
sure you'll be hearing from them soon with some excellent news.

Mike.
I'll pay the money when the bridge is erected.
Cash on delivery. I'm not taking the chance you try and fob me off with some
bridge from some other town or city.
I want to see it up first. Oh, and are you paying the paypal charges or do
you want to offer me a discount?

Martin <><
 
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M

Mike

john boyle said:
I may be missing something, but I cant see what you get for your money?
Well reporting back after more research, I just met someone who
invested £5,000 last February. She has just paid cash for a
Toyota LandCruiser (yes I've seen the proof) and has withdrawn
£5,000 in cash to cover her initial investment. She says her
"fund" is still woth some £30k+.

There are others around with similar success stories. I have no
doubt the bubble will eventually burst, the question is, when?
 
M

Mike

Richard White said:
LOL ... It 'looks' like a scam!

I looked at their web site, which is full of nice meaningful phrases such as "Trust Account
Debentures" and "Bonus Matrix figures" etc.

Apparently, having tried out their "Simulator", if I were to invest a lump sum of US$425.00 now, I
would in two years achieve a "return on investment" of just US$612,249.83 !!!
Presumably this is less the accumulated servce charges of US$4,800.60.

Also apparently, along the way I will be able to withdraw 10% of my gains in cash: a total of
US$60,983.93.
You can withdraw 100% of the "interest" from day one, or leave it
to accumulate, or take a percentage either way.
If I've made any mistakes in the interpretation of PIPS's data from the simulator and web site, then
I'm open to corrections posted here by a PIPS representative.
It's clear enough on the site. You can switch from accumulative
reinvesting to income or any combination of the two, at any time
and as often as you like.

If I had known about this a year ago, I would have put £5k in
without hesitation. Now is probably too late as some "authority"
somewhere will undoubtedly be working hard to put a lid on all
this.
 
M

Martin Davies

Mike said:
You can withdraw 100% of the "interest" from day one, or leave it
to accumulate, or take a percentage either way.


It's clear enough on the site. You can switch from accumulative
reinvesting to income or any combination of the two, at any time
and as often as you like.

If I had known about this a year ago, I would have put £5k in
without hesitation. Now is probably too late as some "authority"
somewhere will undoubtedly be working hard to put a lid on all
this.
Or else they will run out of new members to pay for existing members taking
money out.

Martin <><
 
P

Paul Robson

Well reporting back after more research, I just met someone who
invested £5,000 last February. She has just paid cash for a
Toyota LandCruiser (yes I've seen the proof) and has withdrawn
£5,000 in cash to cover her initial investment. She says her
"fund" is still woth some £30k+.

There are others around with similar success stories. I have no
doubt the bubble will eventually burst, the question is, when?
When more people want money out than there is money in the fund.
 
M

Mike

When more people want money out than there is money in the fund.
Quite. This sounds like a classic (fraudulent) pyramid scheme where
withdrawals are financed, not from growth in the fund, but from new
money being added to the fund by new joiners.

All such schemes must collapse. When they do, most people lose all
their money.

The woman with her Land Cruiser is taking advantage (in advance) of
the misfortune of others. It is simply not possible for a £5,000
investment to grow to £55,000 in a year through legitimate means in a
fund like this.

Mike.
 
M

Mike

If I had known about this a year ago, I would have put £5k in
without hesitation.
Then you're showing no concern whatsoever for all the people who are
ruined by frauds like this.
Now is probably too late as some "authority"
somewhere will undoubtedly be working hard to put a lid on all
this.
I do hope so. The naive people who invest in schemes like this need
to be protected from themselves and from the financial disaster they
wreak on others.

Mike.
 
M

Martin Davies

Mike said:
Quite. This sounds like a classic (fraudulent) pyramid scheme where
withdrawals are financed, not from growth in the fund, but from new
money being added to the fund by new joiners.

All such schemes must collapse. When they do, most people lose all
their money.

The woman with her Land Cruiser is taking advantage (in advance) of
the misfortune of others. It is simply not possible for a £5,000
investment to grow to £55,000 in a year through legitimate means in a
fund like this.

Mike.
Its possible.
Just requires a lot of luck or a lot of risk.
You'd get better odds of doing it on the horses though.

Martin <><
 
M

Mike

When more people want money out than there is money in the fund.
My daughter has a reply to that comment, it goes something like
this. Push your tongue into the lowest recess between your bottom
teeth and lower lip and say (in a dull monotone sound...

"uuuuuuuuuuunnnnnnnnn!"

hth.
 
M

Mike

Mike said:
Quite. This sounds like a classic (fraudulent) pyramid scheme where
withdrawals are financed, not from growth in the fund, but from new
money being added to the fund by new joiners.

All such schemes must collapse. When they do, most people lose all
their money.

The woman with her Land Cruiser is taking advantage (in advance) of
the misfortune of others. It is simply not possible for a £5,000
investment to grow to £55,000 in a year through legitimate means in a
fund like this.
So it is similar in its forecast, viability and its ethical
standards to the state pension scheme and most of the private
ones currently collapsing all around us then.
 
M

Martin Davies

Mike said:
So it is similar in its forecast, viability and its ethical
standards to the state pension scheme and most of the private
ones currently collapsing all around us then.
You think this is that good? :)
Seriously, yes.

The banks, investment companies etc can and do pay out from the money of
people paying in. So long as the paperwork is correct, it doesn't actually
matter whose money is invested in those 100,000 baked bean shares.
You pay £500 into your bank account and the next person in line draws £500
out of their bank account, so long as your account and their account show
the correct info then it doesn't matter about the actual notes used.
Banks tend to have much larger reserves to pay out with though.

Martin <><
 
Joined
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I invested $485.00 in this Ponzi scheme and I would like to have my money back I invested if that's possible
 
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Joined
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Did they recover and money back from the pips Ponzi scheme if so I want my $485.00 back I invested my name is Ezee Holloway and my address is 355 4th Ave SE Lafayette,Alabama 36862 and my phone number is 3347378273 thanks
 

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