Request for Research Paper Ideas


D

Dick Adams

For the last two years, I have been planning a trip to
Australia to visit several Universities. For various
reasons, the trip never got past the idea stage. But I
am going to go in January.

I need a cross-cultural tax topic to research and prepare
a 30-minute presentation plus Q&A time. All ideas will be
appreciated.

Dick
 
Ad

Advertisements

A

Arthur Kamlet

Dick Adams said:
For the last two years, I have been planning a trip to
Australia to visit several Universities. For various
reasons, the trip never got past the idea stage. But I
am going to go in January.

I need a cross-cultural tax topic to research and prepare
a 30-minute presentation plus Q&A time. All ideas will be
appreciated.
Having studied human behavior for many years, (my PhD is in
psychology) I am fascinated at how to use tax policy to
affect social behaviors.

Want to encourage charitible giving? Allow tax deductions
for charitible gifts.

Want to encourage home buying? Allow deductions for
mortgage interest and property taxes but not for apartment
rentals.

Want to reward those with enough discretionary income to
invest in the stock market? Lower then eliminate capital
gain tax and lower tax on dividends.

Etc. I have no idea about Australian taxes, but I'm sure
it's structured to accomplish behavior modification and to
reward and punish various behaviors.

__
Art Kamlet ArtKamlet @ AOL.com Columbus OH K2PZH
 
D

Dick Weaver

Dick said:
[snip]...
I need a cross-cultural tax topic to research and prepare
a 30-minute presentation plus Q&A time. All ideas will be
appreciated.
Compare the taxes and savings of your two neighbors, left
and right. Both earn $100k/yr from a single source, both
spend $65k/yr + taxes, both take standard deduction. From
all external appearances, they live comparable life styles.
The difference?

The one on the left is a member of the moneyed, rule making,
culture. Income is long term capital gains, what isn't
cashed in to pay expenses and taxes remains invested (saved)
tax deferred.

The one on the right is a member of the working class,
salaried or hourly, culture. Allowed a few thousand dollars
of tax deferred savings, remainder of income is taxed even
if saved.

Compare the two cultures: how much taxes are paid, how much
is saved, does this system encourage rational behavior
(benefiting both the individual and the country) for both
individuals, do both individuals believe the tax treatment
of the other is fair, how did this system come to exist,
does the system meet the needs it was designed for (you may
want a different word than "designed"), does this system
have flaws.

Then, for foreign audiences - does your tax system have
similar divisions such that these same comparisons /
questions are appropriate?

dick w
 
J

John H. Fisher

Dick Adams said:
For the last two years, I have been planning a trip to
Australia to visit several Universities. For various
reasons, the trip never got past the idea stage. But I
am going to go in January.

I need a cross-cultural tax topic to research and prepare
a 30-minute presentation plus Q&A time. All ideas will be
appreciated.
Does this help, Dick?

www.google.com/search?ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=Australia%20and%20 U.S>%20 cross%20cultural%20tax%20issues

Good Luck!!!=:)

"Jack" - John H. Fisher - (e-mail address removed)
Philadelphia, Pa - Atlantic City, NJ - West Wildwood, NJ
My Newsgroups & Boards at: http://members.aol.com/TaxService/index.html

Where Ignorance is bliss, 'tis folly to be wise!=:)
 
S

steel

Dick Weaver said:
Dick Adams wrote:
[snip]...
I need a cross-cultural tax topic to research and prepare
a 30-minute presentation plus Q&A time. All ideas will be
appreciated.
Compare the taxes and savings of your two neighbors, left
and right. Both earn $100k/yr from a single source, both
spend $65k/yr + taxes, both take standard deduction. From
all external appearances, they live comparable life styles.
The difference?

The one on the left is a member of the moneyed, rule making,
culture. Income is long term capital gains, what isn't
cashed in to pay expenses and taxes remains invested (saved)
tax deferred.

The one on the right is a member of the working class,
salaried or hourly, culture. Allowed a few thousand dollars
of tax deferred savings, remainder of income is taxed even
if saved.

Compare the two cultures: how much taxes are paid, how much
is saved, does this system encourage rational behavior
(benefiting both the individual and the country) for both
individuals, do both individuals believe the tax treatment
of the other is fair, how did this system come to exist,
does the system meet the needs it was designed for (you may
want a different word than "designed"), does this system
have flaws.

Then, for foreign audiences - does your tax system have
similar divisions such that these same comparisons /
questions are appropriate?
be sure to include discussion regarding the ability, in each
society, of an individual to make choices that allow/cause
him to move into and out of the "moneyed culture", whatever
the heck that is.
 
Ad

Advertisements

G

Guest

Dick Adams said:
For the last two years, I have been planning a trip to
Australia to visit several Universities. For various
reasons, the trip never got past the idea stage. But
I am going to go in January.

I need a cross-cultural tax topic to research and prepare
a 30-minute presentation plus Q&A time. All ideas will be
appreciated.
I believe that in Australia either mortgages on homes are
rare and/or that the interest is not deductible.

Jan Zobel EA
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top