retirement on health grounds


F

Fedup

I intend to stop work on health grounds. I'm 61 and have a heart/lung
condition plus a problem with a knee joint. Recently my employer moved
into another office covering 4 floors. The nature of the job means I'm
up and down stairs all the time. I'd probably be okay on the flat but
now that is impossible. My leg injury has become aggravated and
currently I'm on sick leave.

I work part time. Married and my wife has a small pension of around
£40pw. My earnings are around £600 a calendar month plus a small
pension of £30 per year. An online calculator <
http://entitledto.co.uk/default.aspx > shows I would be about as well
off financially claiming pension credits. I have another pension due
to mature from a long term employment but that isn't payable until I'm
65.

Is there anything I should be aware of before I write a letter of
resignation and toddle off to the DWP and apply for pension credits?
Are there any preferred procedures or any pitfalls? I don't want to
resign then find I have to sign on again for another 3 years
 
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M

mart2306

I intend to stop work on health grounds. I'm 61 and have a heart/lung
condition plus a problem with a knee joint. Recently my employer moved
into another office covering 4 floors. The nature of the job means I'm
up and down stairs all the time. I'd probably be okay on the flat but
now that is impossible. My leg injury has become aggravated and
currently I'm on sick leave.

 I work part time. Married and my wife has a small pension of around
£40pw. My earnings are around £600 a  calendar month plus a small
pension of £30 per year. An online calculator <http://entitledto.co.uk/default.aspx> shows I would be about as well
off financially claiming pension credits. I have another pension due
to mature from a long term employment but that isn't payable until I'm
65.

Is there anything I should be aware of before I write a letter of
resignation and toddle off to the DWP and apply for pension credits?
Are there any preferred procedures or any pitfalls? I don't want to
resign then find I have to sign on again for another 3 years
Don't know about the rest, but did the employer not make any provision
for you going up and down stairs? Equipment, change of duties,
whatever is reasonable.

Martin <><
 
R

Robbie

Fedup said:
I intend to stop work on health grounds. I'm 61 and have a heart/lung
condition plus a problem with a knee joint. Recently my employer moved
into another office covering 4 floors. The nature of the job means I'm
up and down stairs all the time. I'd probably be okay on the flat but
now that is impossible. My leg injury has become aggravated and
currently I'm on sick leave.

I work part time. Married and my wife has a small pension of around
£40pw. My earnings are around £600 a calendar month plus a small
pension of £30 per year. An online calculator <
http://entitledto.co.uk/default.aspx > shows I would be about as well
off financially claiming pension credits. I have another pension due
to mature from a long term employment but that isn't payable until I'm
65.

Is there anything I should be aware of before I write a letter of
resignation and toddle off to the DWP and apply for pension credits?
Are there any preferred procedures or any pitfalls? I don't want to
resign then find I have to sign on again for another 3 years
At age 60+ you can opt to claim either Pension Credit or Incapacity
Benefit or both (or sign on and claim JSA if you so desired).

You could ask your employer to try and make some adjustments to your job
or find you alternative work with the firm as it almost sounds like
constructive dismissal if your employer has brought on problems that
have led to a deterioration in your health and thus causing you to resign.

How long have you been on sick leave?
 
F

Fedup

Don't know about the rest, but did the employer not make any provision
for you going up and down stairs? Equipment, change of duties,
whatever is reasonable.
Only to move a table into a corridor on one floor so I don't have to
carry so much stuff around.
 
F

Fedup

At age 60+ you can opt to claim either Pension Credit or Incapacity
Benefit or both (or sign on and claim JSA if you so desired).
I certainly don't want to claim JSA. I'd rather get pension credits.
AUI the amount I could claim on that is roughly the same as I am
earning ATM.

Can I just write a letter of resignation on health grounds then claim
pension credits or is the process more complicated?
You could ask your employer to try and make some adjustments to your job
or find you alternative work with the firm as it almost sounds like
constructive dismissal if your employer has brought on problems that
have led to a deterioration in your health and thus causing you to resign.

How long have you been on sick leave?
Started yesterday but should have been last month. :(
 
R

Robbie

Fedup said:
I certainly don't want to claim JSA. I'd rather get pension credits.
AUI the amount I could claim on that is roughly the same as I am
earning ATM.

Can I just write a letter of resignation on health grounds then claim
pension credits or is the process more complicated?
To get Pension Credit you just simply have to make a claim and whatever
the reason you have left your job would not matter to your claim.

Remember that the pension your wife gets will be taken into account for
Pension Credit as your income for Pension Credit purposes is classed as
the sum total you and your wife receive.
Started yesterday but should have been last month. :(
If you are no worse off in work (but on the sick) than you would be on
Pension Credit can you not hold back on resigning for a short while so
you don't do anything too hasty and for you to think long and hard about
what your options are? I realise that your job is making you ill and you
might just want to get away from it but it may worth be holding back for
a while and speaking to your boss.

If you really do want to claim Pension Credit then you just need to
submit a claim and to resign from work you just need to follow your
terms of employment and give the required notice. You can claim Pension
Credit the day after your resignation date as I believe (someone may
correct me if I'm wrong) that final wages are ignored when calculating
the start date of Pension Credit.

Try not to do anything too hasty, but I hope that what you decide to do
is what you think is for the best for yourself and not what you think is
the best for your employer.
 
N

Niteawk

Fedup said:
I certainly don't want to claim JSA. I'd rather get pension credits.
AUI the amount I could claim on that is roughly the same as I am
earning ATM.

Can I just write a letter of resignation on health grounds then claim
pension credits or is the process more complicated?
One step at a time please.

The first thing you need to find out is, will your doctor sign you off work
permanently. Without the doctors say so, you wont have a leg to stand on.

OTOH, as you are off sick, stay off sick for as long as your doctor will
allow, in the meantime if your employers are not happy with this, they may
try to dismiss you, then you can take them to tribunal for unfair /
constructive dismissal.
See your local citizens advice if this happens.

After that, if all goes well and you have had a big payout, see if your
doctor will sing you off permanently to avoid signing on.
 
F

Fedup

To get Pension Credit you just simply have to make a claim and whatever
the reason you have left your job would not matter to your claim.
Good

Remember that the pension your wife gets will be taken into account for
Pension Credit as your income for Pension Credit purposes is classed as
the sum total you and your wife receive.
Yep.
Wife gets £43 per week. I currently earn £143 per week net for a 16
hour week.

The online calculator says I will be due pension credit of £145.24 per
week plus council tax benefit of around £17 per week.

My wife is quitting due to ill health. She continued working after
drawing her state pension. Now she is being forced to quit my earnings
are less than pension credits will supply. No brainer really.
If you are no worse off in work (but on the sick) than you would be on
Pension Credit can you not hold back on resigning for a short while so
you don't do anything too hasty and for you to think long and hard about
what your options are?
I intend to hold out as long as possible. At least until my wife's
sick pay runs out.
I realise that your job is making you ill and you
might just want to get away from it but it may worth be holding back for
a while and speaking to your boss.
No good. I need a flat floor area or lifts. There is no chance of
getting either. Certainly not in the current finacial climate.
If you really do want to claim Pension Credit then you just need to
submit a claim and to resign from work you just need to follow your
terms of employment and give the required notice. You can claim Pension
Credit the day after your resignation date as I believe (someone may
correct me if I'm wrong) that final wages are ignored when calculating
the start date of Pension Credit.
That's what I needed to know.
I didn't want to get caught up in any benefit sanctions. Spent a few
years in the last millenium getting harrassed after they shipped my
job overseas. I regard Peter Lilley as being as big a phag as any that
came after him
Try not to do anything too hasty, but I hope that what you decide to do
is what you think is for the best for yourself and not what you think is
the best for your employer.
The time of caring about my job is past. :(

Thanks for the info
 
M

Mike

Niteawk said:
One step at a time please.

The first thing you need to find out is, will your doctor sign you off work
permanently. Without the doctors say so, you wont have a leg to stand on.

OTOH, as you are off sick, stay off sick for as long as your doctor will
allow, in the meantime if your employers are not happy with this, they may
try to dismiss you, then you can take them to tribunal for unfair /
constructive dismissal.
See your local citizens advice if this happens.

After that, if all goes well and you have had a big payout, see if your
doctor will sing you off permanently to avoid signing on.
WTF are you talking about niteawk?? When claiming PC the reason for
leaving employment is completely irrelevant, the DWP does not give a jot!

It is possible that if the OP is incapable of work permanently then he
may be able to get his other pension but he'd have to check the T&C.
It's unlikely that he is permanently incapable from what the OP.

The staying off sick until he recovers is possibly the best option,
maybe even approaching his employer about a change in duties or other
reasonable adjustments. I would say the Disability Discrimination Act
applies to the OP and as such the employer is legally obliged to make
REASONABLE adjustments to accommodate their employee. By the sound of
it it's the up and down the stairs that's the problem and their may be
ways round this that the employer should consider.

If he wants to keep his job the OP would be best approaching his
employer and if they are not prepared to consider reasonable adjustments
then legal advice should be taken.

Mike
 
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H

Harry Stottle

Fedup said:
I intend to stop work on health grounds. I'm 61 and have a heart/lung
condition plus a problem with a knee joint. Recently my employer moved
into another office covering 4 floors. The nature of the job means I'm
up and down stairs all the time. I'd probably be okay on the flat but
now that is impossible. My leg injury has become aggravated and
currently I'm on sick leave.

I work part time. Married and my wife has a small pension of around
£40pw. My earnings are around £600 a calendar month plus a small
pension of £30 per year. An online calculator <
http://entitledto.co.uk/default.aspx > shows I would be about as well
off financially claiming pension credits. I have another pension due
to mature from a long term employment but that isn't payable until I'm
65.

Is there anything I should be aware of before I write a letter of
resignation and toddle off to the DWP and apply for pension credits?
Are there any preferred procedures or any pitfalls? I don't want to
resign then find I have to sign on again for another 3 years
When you say "I have another pension due to mature from a long term
employment but that isn't payable until I'm
65", are you sure this isn't payable, as most pensions can be taken early.
If it is possible to take the pension, you will probably have to take it,
and the weekly amount paid will be deducted from the Pension Credits, plus
any lump sum from the pension that takes your savings above £6000 will
result in a £1 reduction in Pension credits for every £500 savings above the
£6000.
 
F

Fedup

When you say "I have another pension due to mature from a long term
employment but that isn't payable until I'm
65", are you sure this isn't payable, as most pensions can be taken early.
It can be taken early but at a much reduced value. I'd lose over 2000
a year plus the lump sum
If it is possible to take the pension, you will probably have to take it,
and the weekly amount paid will be deducted from the Pension Credits, plus
any lump sum from the pension that takes your savings above £6000 will
result in a £1 reduction in Pension credits for every £500 savings above the
£6000.
So they would monitor my savings ?
 
H

Harry Stottle

Fedup said:
It can be taken early but at a much reduced value. I'd lose over 2000
a year plus the lump sum
As I understand it, if you can take the pension but don't, then you are
assumed to have an income of what that pension would have paid if you had
taken it, and your Pension Credits suitably reduced in accordance, I am not
absolutely sure about this so others on here may be able to clarify.
So they would monitor my savings ?
You have to declare any savings, and any changes to those savings that could
affect your Pension Credits, or other benefits, so you could say they are
monitoring your savings :)
 
M

Mike

Fedup said:
Not according to this
http://www.thepensionservice.gov.uk/pensioncredit/entitled.asp

But the government is not very good at publicising the total facts
That page is obviously a very simple outline of PC, it is way more
complicated than that. The 'total facts' are available should you wish
to do a lot of research.

Harry is correct, if your pension is available to you you would be
expected to use it and if you don't the PC assessment would assume a
notional income, basically what you would be entitled to from the
scheme now.

http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/em2005/uksiem_20052465_en.pdf bottom of P1
sums it up.

Mike
 
F

Fedup

That page is obviously a very simple outline of PC, it is way more
complicated than that. The 'total facts' are available should you wish
to do a lot of research.

Harry is correct, if your pension is available to you you would be
expected to use it and if you don't the PC assessment would assume a
notional income, basically what you would be entitled to from the
scheme now.

http://www.opsi.gov.uk/si/em2005/uksiem_20052465_en.pdf bottom of P1
sums it up.
Thanks
That is exactly what I wanted to know.

I don't want to give up work but my wife has too and my health is not
going to get any better. Works pension can be taken early but I lose
over £10000 lump sum and end up with a pension of of only £140 per
week. That is against staying on and getting a £10000+ lump sum and a
pension of £156 per week. Not really much in it except for the lump
sum and if I got that the government would find some way of taking it
away. :(
 
R

Robbie

Fedup said:
Thanks
That is exactly what I wanted to know.

I don't want to give up work but my wife has too and my health is not
going to get any better. Works pension can be taken early but I lose
over £10000 lump sum and end up with a pension of of only £140 per
week. That is against staying on and getting a £10000+ lump sum and a
pension of £156 per week. Not really much in it except for the lump
sum and if I got that the government would find some way of taking it
away. :(
I don't think you can be penalised under Pension Credit rules for not
opting to take an Occupational Pension or a lump sum early if it
involves losing out on money but I'm not an expert on the Pension Credit
rules - Mike knows more about it than me.
 
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M

mart2306

Thanks
That is exactly what I wanted to know.

I don't want to give up work but my wife has too and my health is not
going to get any better.  Works pension can be taken early but I lose
over £10000 lump sum and end up with a pension of of only £140 per
week. That is against staying on and getting a £10000+ lump sum and a
pension of  £156 per week. Not really much in it except for the lump
sum and if I got that the government would find some way of taking it
away.  :(- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -
Probably. You'd have a lump sum in your bank account for starters....

Martin <><
 

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