reverse mortgage


C

Cal Lester

How They Work

Reverse mortgage loans typically require no repayment for as long as you live in your home. But they must be repaid in full, including all interest and other charges, when the last living borrower dies, sells the home, or permanently moves away.

Because you make no monthly payments, the amount you owe grows larger over time. As your debt grows larger, the amount of cash you would have left after selling and paying off the loan (your "equity") generally grows smaller. But you can never owe more than your home's value at the time the loan is repaid.

Reverse mortgage borrowers continue to own their homes. So you are still responsible for property taxes, insurance, and repairs. If you fail to carry out these responsibilities, your loan could become due and payable in full.





The above was copied from AARP home page.

Cal
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Similar Threads

Reverse mortgages 11
Reverse mortgages? 7
reverse mortgage 0
reverse mortgage 4
Mortgage Insurance on Reverse Mortgage 20
Reverse Mortgage Question 7
Reverse mortgage math? 36
Personal Reverse Mortgage 1

Top