Stock Cost Basis


D

Dennis Marks

I purchased one share of stock from OneShare.com as a
novelty. I was issued an actual stock certificate. I will
probably never sell it but I would just like to know the
answer to the following since I like trivia.

The stock is DreamWorks Animation. The charge was $27 for
the stock (which was pretty close to the actual price), $39
transfer fee, and $7.99 shipping. I had a discount code for
free shipping but what they did was actually take $7.99 off
the transfer fee.

Stock $27
Transfer fee $31.01
Shipping $7.99
Total $66

I received a W-9 from the transfer agent and returned it. I
never received anything from a stock broker. I assume that
OneShare.com buys large lots of stock and then just has
single shares transferred as needed.

My question is what is my cost basis? If I ever did sell it
how much would the gain have to be before it has to be
reported? If I receive dividends, at what point does it
have to be reported?

Be sure to see Shrek 3 when it comes out so I can make some
money.

--
Dennis

Disclaimer: The above is my opinion. I do not guarantee it.
Be sure to back up any files involved and use at your own
risk. Batteries not included. Not for internal use. Don't
run with knives.
 
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D

Dick Adams

Stock $27
Transfer fee $31.01
Shipping $7.99
Total $66

My question is what is my cost basis?
My first wife adamantly insisted on possession of the stock
certificate. It was a family tradition for her. I dismissed
it, but tolerated it, as a subculture paranoia. Then a major
brokerage firm had its doors padlocked.

The Stock and the transfer fee (which I suspect is really
the commission and internal costs) go into the basis.
Shipping a piece of paper should not cost $7.99, but you
paid it as part of the purchase and I would put it in the
basis - others may disagree. But it is diminimus.

You have no deduction in the current year. You will pay
taxes on the dividends, if any, as you receive them or are
credited with them, i.e., a DRIP. Divendends reinvested via
a DRIP increase basis because you paid taxes on them in the
appropriate taxt year.

Someone buy one share of stock at 2.44 times its value is not
in this for the money. My suggestion is do not sell it until
it gets to $300 because the selling costs are going to be
outrageous.

Dick
 
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R

Rich Carreiro

(e-mail address removed) (Dennis Marks) writes:

[original poster buys single share of stock and
has certificate sent to him]
Stock $27
Transfer fee $31.01
Shipping $7.99
Total $66
[snip]

First question -- does DreamWorks even exist as a
separate company anymore? :) Didn't Paramount or Sony
gobble it up?
My question is what is my cost basis?
That's an interesting question. The naive (but still quite
possibly correct) answer is $66. Does OneShare require you
to take the physical certificate, or could you have left it
on deposit with OneShare and saved the $39 of transfer and
shipping fees?
If I ever did sell it how much would the gain have to be before it
has to be reported?
You have to report the sale regardless of what your gain or
loss is. You report it on Sched D and (also on Sched D)
compute your gain or loss on the sale.
If I receive dividends, at what point does it have to be reported?
Right from the very beginning. There's *no* "I don't have
to report dividends until I get back what I paid for the
stock" rule.
 
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B

Bill

(e-mail address removed) (Dennis=A0Marks) posted:
I purchased one share of stock from
OneShare.com as a novelty. I was issued an
actual stock certificate. I will probably never
sell it but I would just like to know the answer
to the following since I like trivia.
The stock is DreamWorks Animation. The
charge was $27 for the stock (which was
pretty close to the actual price), $39 transfer
fee, and $7.99 shipping. I had a discount code
for free shipping but what they did was
actually take $7.99 off the transfer fee.

Stock $27
Transfer fee $31.01
Shipping $7.99
Total $66

I received a W-9 from the transfer agent and
returned it. I never received anything from a
stock broker. I assume that OneShare.com
buys large lots of stock and then just has
single shares transferred as needed.

My question is what is my cost basis?
That's easy: $66 (what it cost you)
If I ever did sell it how much would the gain
have to be before it has to be reported?
Reporting would be required, regardless -- to show your
proceeds from the sale, and the result might be a gain, a
loss or -0-, depending on the proceeds amount vs the cost.
If I receive dividends, at what point does it
have to be reported?
Anything you receive as a dividend theoretically has to be
reported -- unless it's below 50 cents. .50 and up would
become $1, etc. (I actually once saw a 40-cent dividend
reported on a separate 1099-DIV, which I ignored.)

Bill
 
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S

Seth Breidbart

Dennis Marks said:
I purchased one share of stock from OneShare.com as a
novelty.

Stock $27
Transfer fee $31.01
Shipping $7.99
Total $66

My question is what is my cost basis?
It looks like $66.
If I ever did sell it how much would the gain have to be
before it has to be reported?
The sale must be reported, the amount of gain affects the
amount of tax you owe, but not the requirement to report.
(If your total income is low enough you might not have to
file at all.)
If I receive dividends, at what point does it
have to be reported?
If you have to file, all dividends have to be reported.

Seth
 
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S

Stuart A. Bronstein

Rich Carreiro said:
(e-mail address removed) (Dennis Marks) writes:
That's an interesting question. The naive (but still quite
possibly correct) answer is $66. Does OneShare require you
to take the physical certificate, or could you have left it
on deposit with OneShare and saved the $39 of transfer and
shipping fees?
And incurred a $40 per year cost for maintaining a brokerage
account that doesn't have any activity.

Stu
 
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B

Barry Margolin

Rich Carreiro said:
Does OneShare require you
to take the physical certificate, or could you have left it
on deposit with OneShare and saved the $39 of transfer and
shipping fees?
Why would anyone buy from them *except* to get the physical
certificate? For instance, many people buy Disney stock
because their stock certificates are a work of art, suitable
for framing.

If he didn't want the certificate, he presumably could have
bought the stock through a normal broker and avoided those
outrageous fees.
 
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D

Dennis Marks

Rich Carreiro said:
(e-mail address removed) (Dennis Marks) writes:
[original poster buys single share of stock and
has certificate sent to him]
Stock $27
Transfer fee $31.01
Shipping $7.99
Total $66
[snip]

First question -- does DreamWorks even exist as a
separate company anymore? :) Didn't Paramount or Sony
gobble it up?
My question is what is my cost basis?
That's an interesting question. The naive (but still quite
possibly correct) answer is $66. Does OneShare require you
to take the physical certificate, or could you have left it
on deposit with OneShare and saved the $39 of transfer and
shipping fees?
You have to report the sale regardless of what your gain or
loss is. You report it on Sched D and (also on Sched D)
compute your gain or loss on the sale.
Right from the very beginning. There's *no* "I don't have
to report dividends until I get back what I paid for the
stock" rule.
Dreamworks Animation was spun off of Dreamworks a couple of
years ago. It is a separate corporation.

OneShare.com is not a stock broker. They are allowed to
handle the stock transfer due to the fact that they sell
stock as a novelty, they only sell single shares, and the
shares are framed. They were given this exemption to the
broker rules by the government.

The reason I asked about reporting is that any dividend
would probably be less than a dollar. Would the stock
registrar even report such a small amount? I will probably
never sell the stock unless it has gone up astronomically so
capital gains are probably of no concern.

--
Dennis

Disclaimer: The above is my opinion. I do not guarantee it.
Be sure to back up any files involved and use at your own
risk. Batteries not included. Not for internal use. Don't
run with knives.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
S

Stuart A. Bronstein

Dennis Marks said:
OneShare.com is not a stock broker. They are allowed to
handle the stock transfer due to the fact that they sell
stock as a novelty, they only sell single shares, and the
shares are framed. They were given this exemption to the
broker rules by the government.
I always thought you could get individual shares from any
stock broker. When my son was young I got him five shares
each of Disney and McDonalds. There was no problem doing
so, and the transaction costs were reasonable.
The reason I asked about reporting is that any dividend
would probably be less than a dollar. Would the stock
registrar even report such a small amount? I will probably
never sell the stock unless it has gone up astronomically so
capital gains are probably of no concern.
Quarterly dividends on five shares of McDonalds stock were
routinely under one dollar. But the checks were always
sent, even if the stamp on the envelope was more than the
amount written on the check.

Stu
 
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R

Rich Carreiro

Stuart A. Bronstein said:
I always thought you could get individual shares from any
stock broker. When my son was young I got him five shares
each of Disney and McDonalds. There was no problem doing
so, and the transaction costs were reasonable.
You can, but the costs are less reasonable these days.
Sure, the commission is likely to only be $10-$15
these days, but at least with the big name brokers,
they charge around $50 to certificate and ship the
shares to you.
 
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