Tax complexity grows and grows


A

AK

http://www.ntu.org/main/press_release.php?PressID=576&org_name=NTU

Americans Snared in Stickier Web of Tax Complexity, Study Finds

(Alexandria, VA) -- A decade of federal government tinkering with the Tax
Code has added a billion extra hours to the annual paperwork burdens on
American taxpayers, according to a comprehensive study of tax complexity
conducted by the non-partisan National Taxpayers Union (NTU). Although the
2001 and 2003 tax cut laws put more money in millions of Americans' pockets,
NTU found that the savings came with a price tag of their own -- a
measurable rise in complex forms, instructions, and other compliance woes.
"Federal income tax rates have often risen and fallen, but the complexity of
the tax system itself has almost always gone in one direction -- upwards,"
said NTU Senior Counselor and study author David Keating. "Even though
paying taxes is still the biggest pain for Americans, the very process of
filing taxes has become a major headache in itself."
.. .. . . .
 
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W

Wayne Brasch

AK said:
http://www.ntu.org/main/press_release.php?PressID=576&org_name=NTU

Americans Snared in Stickier Web of Tax Complexity, Study Finds

(Alexandria, VA) -- A decade of federal government tinkering with the Tax
Code has added a billion extra hours to the annual paperwork burdens on
American taxpayers, according to a comprehensive study of tax complexity
conducted by the non-partisan National Taxpayers Union (NTU). Although the
2001 and 2003 tax cut laws put more money in millions of Americans' pockets,
NTU found that the savings came with a price tag of their own -- a
measurable rise in complex forms, instructions, and other compliance woes.
"Federal income tax rates have often risen and fallen, but the complexity of
the tax system itself has almost always gone in one direction -- upwards,"
said NTU Senior Counselor and study author David Keating. "Even though
paying taxes is still the biggest pain for Americans, the very process of
filing taxes has become a major headache in itself."
. .. . . .
It will never get better until members of Congress tell all these special
interest groups "No", "Go away and leave us alone". I'm afraid most members
of Congress are afraid to do this since they will then probably lose their
position in Congress and may have to go out and get a real job.

Wayne Brasch, CPA, M. S. Taxation
 

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