tax court examination class


K

kde

I am a CPA and would like to be admitted to tax court. Tax
court offers an examination to be admitted. Non-attorneys
can practice in tax court. Does anyone know if there are any
preparation classes similar to the GMAT or LSAT classes that
I can take?
 
Last edited by a moderator:
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D

Dick Adams

I am a CPA and would like to be admitted to tax court. Tax
court offers an examination to be admitted. Non-attorneys
can practice in tax court. Does anyone know if there are any
preparation classes similar to the GMAT or LSAT classes that
I can take?
The exam is held every two years in November. You missed the
2006 exam. So you have until November of 2008 to prepare.

www.maxstaxes.com has a prep course on a CD for $1295. I
have no idea of how effective or efficient it is and do not
know anyone who has used it. I also don't know anyone who
has received a passing grade on the exam.

Given that a law school graduate who has no idea of the
difference between sections 179 and 1031 can practice before
the Tax Court without examination and the highest scorer on
the rigorous Enrolled Agents Exam will probably not get a
passing grade on the Tax Court Exam, it is my rarely humble
opinion that the exam is nothing more than a thinly veiled
sham to prevent tax professionals without a law degree from
being admitted to practice before the Tax Court.

It would tell you what I really think, but the moderator does
not permit vulgarity and profanity.

Dick
 
Last edited by a moderator:
C

cballard

I am a CPA and would like to be admitted to tax court. Tax
court offers an examination to be admitted. Non-attorneys
can practice in tax court. Does anyone know if there are any
preparation classes similar to the GMAT or LSAT classes that
I can take?
You unfortunately just missed the exam, which was given on
November 9. The next exam will be in the fall of 2008. Just
to warn you, the exam is reported to be extremely difficult,
with a pass rate of about 10%.

For study classes, the following popped up in a google
search:

http://www.maxstaxes.com/index.html

I have no experience dealing with the person who runs that
course, but the overview of the materials did look fairly
comprehensive.

--Chris
 
Last edited by a moderator:
M

Mike Wellman

I am a CPA and would like to be admitted to tax court. Tax
court offers an examination to be admitted. Non-attorneys
can practice in tax court. Does anyone know if there are any
preparation classes similar to the GMAT or LSAT classes that
I can take?
I took a course a number of years ago from the South New
England Tax Institute for that purpose. I do not know if
they are still around.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
D

Dick Adams

I am a CPA and would like to be admitted to tax court. Tax
court offers an examination to be admitted. Non-attorneys
can practice in tax court. Does anyone know if there are any
preparation classes similar to the GMAT or LSAT classes that
I can take?
The exam is held every two years in November. You missed the
2006 exam. So you have until November of 2008 to prepare.

www.maxstaxes.com has a prep course on a CD for $1295. I
have no idea of how effective or efficient it is and do not
know anyone who has used it. I also don't know anyone who
has received a passing grade on the exam.

Given that a law school graduate who has no idea of the
difference between sections 179 and 1031 can practice before
the Tax Court without examination and the highest scorer on
the rigorous Enrolled Agents Exam will probably not get a
passing grade on the Tax Court Exam, it is my rarely humble
opinion that the exam is nothing more than a thinly veiled
sham to prevent tax professionals without a law degree from
being admitted to practice before the Tax Court.

It would tell you what I really think, but the moderator does
not permit vulgarity and profanity.

Dick
 
Last edited by a moderator:
M

Mike Wellman

I am a CPA and would like to be admitted to tax court. Tax
court offers an examination to be admitted. Non-attorneys
can practice in tax court. Does anyone know if there are any
preparation classes similar to the GMAT or LSAT classes that
I can take?
I took a course a number of years ago from the South New
England Tax Institute for that purpose. I do not know if
they are still around.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
C

cballard

I am a CPA and would like to be admitted to tax court. Tax
court offers an examination to be admitted. Non-attorneys
can practice in tax court. Does anyone know if there are any
preparation classes similar to the GMAT or LSAT classes that
I can take?
You unfortunately just missed the exam, which was given on
November 9. The next exam will be in the fall of 2008. Just
to warn you, the exam is reported to be extremely difficult,
with a pass rate of about 10%.

For study classes, the following popped up in a google
search:

http://www.maxstaxes.com/index.html

I have no experience dealing with the person who runs that
course, but the overview of the materials did look fairly
comprehensive.

--Chris
 
Last edited by a moderator:
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S

Stuart A. Bronstein

Dick Adams said:
(e-mail address removed) wrote:
The exam is held every two years in November. You missed the
2006 exam. So you have until November of 2008 to prepare.

Given that a law school graduate who has no idea of the
difference between sections 179 and 1031 can practice before
the Tax Court without examination and the highest scorer on
the rigorous Enrolled Agents Exam will probably not get a
passing grade on the Tax Court Exam, it is my rarely humble
opinion that the exam is nothing more than a thinly veiled
sham to prevent tax professionals without a law degree from
being admitted to practice before the Tax Court.
It does not take three years to learn all the material
lawyers must in order to pass the bar exam.

What takes three years? Law school is (in my experience)
set up to brainwash people into thinking like lawyers. One
minor example: There is a latin word used fairly commonly
these days: quasi. Before going to law school most people
pronouce the word "KWA-zee" the way everyone else does. But
after law school lawyers pronounce it "KWAYZ-eye."

My guess is that the Tax Court prefers people who think like
they do and can look up what they need to, rather than
people who know the law and rules but won't necessarily
present it in the form the judges prefer.

Stu
 
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