'Tax Ref' Field on Personal Self Assessment Tax Return


J

John Wallis

I am currently completing a personal self assessment tax return for
somebody and have noticed that their 'Tax Ref' as shown at the top of
the paper return issued to them in April is not the National Insurance
number that it has been in previous years.

The National Insurance number is of the form 'XX 99 99 99 X' where 'X'
is a letter and '9' is a digit, but the 'Tax Ref' printed on the tax
return is of the form '99 X9 99 99'.

Within the tax return there is a question asking for the National
Insurance number if it is not shown on the front of the form, and this
implies that the National Insurance number would normally still appear
on the front of the form.

What I would like to know is if the 'Tax Ref' printed on the front of
the form is still supposed to be the National Insurance number and
something has gone wrong, or whether the new-style 'Tax Ref' is as it
should be (my own tax return still shows my National Insurance number,
but it is possible that new-style 'Tax Refs' are being introduced
gradually and mine has not yet been changed).

By the way, when I say 'Tax Ref' I am not referring to the UTR which
is printed above it on the tax return (given that there is such a
thing as a UTR, it makes one wonder why the Inland Revenue wants
people to quote the 'Tax Ref' on top of supplementary pages).

I have already asked the Inland Revenue what is going on (with the
new-style 'Tax Ref', not why they need more than one unique identifier
for any given individual), and unsurprisingly did not get an answer.

This matter is not, of course, of earth-shattering importance, but I
would like to know what is happening.

John Wallis.
 
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P

Peter Saxton

The Inland Revenue are totally out of control. You'll have difficulty
getting a sensible answer out of them if you phone them. I've never
understood why they don't have several references with individual
names and then the tax return should ask for the references by name.
 
D

David Floyd

This is temporary National Insurance Number (NINO)
A temporary NINO is TN followed by date of birth in ddmmyy format (6
figures) followed by M(ale) or F(emale) thus giving the usual required
number of NI characters in the correct format e.g.. TN090744M a male
born 9th July 1944.

DF
 
S

Speed Demon

The National Insurance number is of the form 'XX 99 99 99 X' where 'X'
is a letter and '9' is a digit, but the 'Tax Ref' printed on the tax
return is of the form '99 X9 99 99'.
This is temporary National Insurance Number (NINO) and is usually used when
the IR receive a P46 or P45 and no NINO is attached and they cannot trace
the person on their system through the usual channels.

It usually happens when someone has their first job, or have not worked for
a while and are therefore not on the IR computers.

I assume that in the past the correct NINO has appeared on the Tax Return -
I would enter it on the Tax Return in box 22.7 (page 9) and maybe as a
precaution put a quick note in box 23.5 (additional information).

regards

Alex
 
S

Speed Demon

David Floyd said:
A temporary NINO is TN followed by date of birth in ddmmyy format (6
figures) followed by M(ale) or F(emale) thus giving the usual required
number of NI characters in the correct format e.g.. TN090744M a male
born 9th July 1944.
Yes & No

When the IR set up a temp NINO they use 99 X 99 99 9 - this is an automated
process and are issued consecutively throughout the particular IR region

When an employer sets a temp NINO up they are advised to use TN <date of
birth> M/F - The IR cannot use this as a temp NINO and if they received the
above and could not trace the correct NINO they would then use set up one of
'their' temp NINO's, ie 99 X 99 99 9

Alex
 
S

Speed Demon

Peter Saxton said:
The Inland Revenue are totally out of control. You'll have difficulty
getting a sensible answer out of them if you phone them. I've never
understood why they don't have several references with individual
names and then the tax return should ask for the references by name.
Agreed. Surely it would be far easier and more logical to put National
Insurance Number or NINO - then everyone would know which 'reference' they
were referring to.

Alex
 
A

Andrew

Peter Saxton said:
The Inland Revenue are totally out of control. You'll have difficulty
getting a sensible answer out of them if you phone them.
<snip>

Peter, I think the word "sensible" is superfluous in this case. Generally
speaking I consider it little short of a miracle if I even get through to
many Inland Revenue offices nowadays.

Still, it reminds me of a story I heard about 10 years ago concerning a
certain large IR office which was having difficulties meeting its targets
under the new Taxpayers' Charter wrt answering telephone calls within 30
seconds. Rather than employ another switchboard operator, they reduced the
number of incoming lines from 15 to 4. OK, so your chance of actually
getting through was next to nil, but if you did you could guarantee your
call would be answered within 30 seconds!
 
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P

Paul Garner

That's like the staff suggestion a friend of mine put in when he was working
for IR and they were getting some stick because of their failure to deal
with mail. The complaint had been made that the IR was sitting on millions
of unopened letters. The staff suggestion was "open them, and then sit on
them"
 

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