Taxpayers have stopped fearing the IRS


J

John Galt

Congress to Jump-Start the IRS?

by Joe Blow

When the people fear the government, tyranny has found victory. ~
Thomas Jefferson

John Cochran writes, "Congress is concerned by a new report that
indicates tax evaders no longer fear the IRS."

Apparently, some people have seen the light at the end of the tunnel.

"The result is billions of dollars are lost to the U.S. treasury —
billions that put more of a burden on honest people who do pay their
taxes."

Non sequitur and false. The U.S. Treasury cannot lose what it never
had and what one person pays has absolutely no bearing on what anyone
else pays. The notion of paying a "fair share" is a red herring at
best. The Internal Revenue Code is silent on the issue, telling you
all you need to know about that popular urban legend.

The federal income tax system is voluntary, and filing a return is
only required if a liability exists. That can only be determined after
an assessment is made. Not filing is certainly no proof of dishonesty
since it is normal behavior when no liability exists.

The employee makes the assessment and if he or she determines that no
liability exists, there is no reason to file, unless a refund is due.
At that point, if the IRS disagrees, it is free to conduct its own
assessment. The fact that the IRS is unable to do so in all cases is
not the employee's problem. Neither is it the problem of anyone else,
who after conducting an assessment, determines that a liability exists
and then files his or her own return.

"Congressional investigators report 400,000 people are using tax
evasion schemes, such as hiding revenue in offshore banks, often on
pleasant islands in the Caribbean . That's three times more than the
IRS reported to Congress just a few months ago. ‘It's astonishing that
the IRS isn't taking the action we need to crack down on these 400,000
people who are stealing $40 billion a year from the rest of us,' said
Bob McIntyre of Citizens for Tax Justice."

More bogus logic, for public consumption. No connection exists between
individual taxpayers. The fact that some individuals may be sheltering
their income offshore in no way results in "stealing $40 billion a
year from the rest of us." Sheltering one's own income doesn't "steal"
anything from anybody, including the IRS. Your income does not belong
to the IRS, or any other State agency. It is private property, subject
to forfeit only through due process. Once again, the fact that the IRS
is unable to control this issue in all cases is not the employee's
problem.

"‘The number of Americans who believe it is OK to cheat on their taxes
has gone from 11 percent to 17 percent in just the last four years,'
IRS Commissioner Mark Everson said."

Cheating is one thing, complying with the law, as written, is quite
another. The fact that Congress has instituted an income tax system
that is an unworkable abortion is not the employee's problem. If the
IRS cannot function within its own system, it should be abolished. Any
company that functioned as poorly as the IRS does would have gone out
of business decades ago. The shareholders would have seen to that.
What are citizens if not State shareholders?

"Congress, shocked by the growing number of tax evaders, now says it
wants the IRS to get tough again. But Congress cut this year's IRS
budget request, making it harder to collect $40 billion from tax
cheats."

The IRS now finds itself worse off than before, thanks to the
intervention of Congress back in 1997, when it demanded a "kindler,
gentler" IRS.

The State has only one tool: force. Obviously, what is needed now is
more force, to make the voluntary income tax system even more
voluntary, right?

The anti-tax movement continues to grow, as does the number of
non-filers. Currently, the vast majority of non-filers are simply
ignored by the IRS and relatively few cases ever come to trial, let
alone result in a "conviction" or prison time. Of course, when the IRS
"wins" one of these cases it is national news, but when it loses the
press is not interested. Funny how that works, huh?

"‘It's astonishing that the IRS isn't taking the action we need to
crack down on these 400,000 people who are stealing $40 billion a year
from the rest of us,' said Bob McIntyre of Citizens for Tax Justice."

Here's my much more accurate version of the above statement:

It's astonishing that the people aren't taking the action we need to
crack down on these State agents who are stealing trillions of dollars
a year from the rest of us, including the unborn, for decades to come.

States, like income tax systems, only survive as long as the support
of the slaves continues. When that support disappears, so do they. The
result is freedom vice tyranny.

Maybe 2004 will be the year when the slaves figure out that they can
control their futures and finally choose liberty over slavery by
withdrawing their support of the State and the agency that is uses to
enslave them — the IRS.

If you want peace and freedom, stop paying for war and tyranny.


January 6, 2004


discuss this column in the forum

Joe Blow is the pen name of a freelance writer currently living on the
left coast.




http://www.Strike-The-Root.com
 
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T

Tam

The federal income tax system is voluntary
Not true. The prisons are full of people who mis-read the hype to think they
were not obliged to pay.

On the other hand, except for Canada there is no way the IRS can collect
from you if you live abroad. Think Marc Rich. (And, by the way, Rich's
pardon was designed to allow him to travel abroad without fear of
extradition for fraud, including all the trading he did with Iran in
violation of sanctions. The tax evasion issue was a red herring; you can't
be extradited for tax evasion, only for the money-laundering and fraud often
connected with it. Rich never planned to return to the USA. Perhaps you
could do likewise. Bush will no doubt pardon you.)

But get a foreign passport, because they won't renew your American one.
 
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