"TR all" vs. "% gain" in portfolio view?


B

brett

I'm using Money Plus Deluxe. What is the difference between these two
columns? Their values are very different from each other. TR all
might be down by -1.1% but % gain will be down by -6.3% for the same
position/account.
 
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D

Dick Watson

I think Total Return takes dividends into account and Gain is just capital
gain.
 
C

Cal Learner-- MVP

I'm using Money Plus Deluxe. What is the difference between these two
columns? Their values are very different from each other. TR all
might be down by -1.1% but % gain will be down by -6.3% for the same
position/account.
I recommend that you configure to not use the "%Gain" column.
There are so many useful columns available in the Portfolio, and
for me "%Gain" is not one.

The main difference between % Gain and Total Return All (TR all)
appears to differ if sales have been made. Both appear to take
dividends into account.

If showing sold securities, %gain can go negative ... buy at 100,
sell at 1, big negative.

test buy 100 at $10.00
Sell 99 at $10.10
%gain says 100% TR All says 1%


So, to reiterate, get rid of %gain and use the TR columns. There are
dozens of useful columns for the portfolio. You found the weird one.
 
B

brett

I've created a test account. It has $1000 cash. I bought a KEP at
$10. It is now at $13.50. Both columns show +35%. I then changed
my purchase price to $15. Both columns show -10%. Looks like the
difference might be in how they handle dividends but I can't tell with
this simple test.
 
C

Cal Learner-- MVP

I've created a test account. It has $1000 cash. I bought a KEP at
$10. It is now at $13.50. Both columns show +35%. I then changed
my purchase price to $15. Both columns show -10%. Looks like the
difference might be in how they handle dividends but I can't tell with
this simple test.
Sell 90% for $20. You will see a big difference.
 
J

Jose

I recommend that you configure to not use the "%Gain" column.
There are so many useful columns available in the Portfolio, and
for me "%Gain" is not one.

The main difference between % Gain and Total Return All (TR all)
appears to differ if sales have been made.  Both appear to take
dividends into account.

If showing sold securities, %gain can go negative ...  buy at 100,
sell at 1, big negative.

test buy 100 at $10.00
Sell 99 at $10.10
%gain says 100%  TR All says 1%

So, to reiterate, get rid of %gain and use the TR columns. There are
dozens of useful columns for the portfolio. You found the weird one.
Interesting... This is what it does:

Buy 100 @ $10.00
Sell 99 at $10.10 - proceeds are $999.90, cost basis is $990, so
capital gain is $9.90 (1%, as defined by TR)

Now you hold 1 share worth $10.10, with a cost basis of $10.00. But
the total gains from that security is:
- $9.90 gains already in your pocket
- $0.10 gains still not realized
TOTAL: $10.00 gains, which based on your cost basis of the "remaining"
shares, is 100% gain!

Why on earth would Microsoft calculate a % gain using only the cost
basis of the remaining shares????

Good point from Cal: Stay away from %Gain. Now I will!!
 
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C

Cal Learner-- MVP

Why on earth would Microsoft calculate a % gain using only the cost
basis of the remaining shares????

Good point from Cal: Stay away from %Gain. Now I will!!
There are what -- 60 or so good useful columns to choose from?
Having just one dud available is not bad.
 
B

brettrkr

Thanks. I guess this goes for the "Gain" column as well than.

Concluding, is "TR all" the gain/loss (dividends included) over the
life of that portfolio?
 
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C

Cal Learner-- MVP

In said:
Thanks. I guess this goes for the "Gain" column as well than.

Concluding, is "TR all" the gain/loss (dividends included) over the
life of that portfolio?
Gain is affected by SeeADifferentView->ShowClosedPositions.


Note that the PriceAppreciation column does not include dividends as
Gain does.
 

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