UNemployment benefits


D

DERRICK ROBINSON

This may be a bit off topic. Any help would be appreciated. When an employee
losses his or her job, do medical benefits stop immediately or is there a
grace period before it ends?
Thank you.
Derrick
 
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C

Cal Lester

Generaly speaking there would normally be a period between the date of seperation, and the next
payment date. (in other words, the month IS paid for). However any further grace period would be
defined IN the contract itself. The requirements for many States differ. In addition any "on-going"
claim that originated prior to seperation, would be normally covered. Depending on the number of
employees, you may be eligible for governmental extended coverage.
Cal
 
B

beliavsky

DERRICK said:
This may be a bit off topic. Any help would be appreciated. When an employee
losses his or her job, do medical benefits stop immediately or is there a
grace period before it ends?
Thank you.
Derrick
You can read about "COBRA Continuation Health Coverage" at
http://www.dol.gov/ebsa/faqs/faq_consumer_cobra.html . You may be
entitled to continue the health insurance coverage previously provided
by your employer for some period of time, if you pay the premiums
yourself. You could ask the human resources department of your former
employer about COBRA.
 
G

Guest

DERRICK ROBINSON said:
This may be a bit off topic. Any help would be appreciated. When an employee
losses his or her job, do medical benefits stop immediately or is there a
grace period before it ends?
I was laid off about 3 years ago with severance pay, and my former employer
continued to cover me for that length of time. At that point, I used my
COBRA benefits for a year until I found a new job with benefits and became
covered by their plan.

I subsequently left that job for another one, and my last day at work was in
the middle of the month. Since our premiums were paid out of the month's
first paycheck, I was still covered for the remaining 2 weeks. Then I
played the COBRA game (filled out the paperwork, wrote a check and gave it
to a trusted relative to mail in case I was hit by a truck) until I was
eligible for the new employer's plan 30 days later.

I expect it's one of those questions where the answer is "it depends" and is
perhaps state and/or employer-specific. I live in one of the southern state
in the US.

Hope this helps!
 
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D

DERRICK ROBINSON

Thanks a lot to everyone. You have thrown some light on this issue.
Derrick
 

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