Using WindowsXP encryption with Quicken 2006


R

RWEmerson

Please advise whether any of you has used the encryption capability of
WindowsXP with Quicken 2006 and, if so, whether it worked well. If
issues, what were they?
 
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J

Joe John

XP excryption is a per file cipher [or folder, which then encrypts entire
contents]. Its good enough but there are better one's out there that give
you much more control over the encryption. it has a ton of ills:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308989

http://computing.astate.edu/win2k/XP Encryption.htm

The freeware truecrypt blows it away easily.

http://www.truecrypt.org/

BUT, you have to be willing to learn how to use TC. XP AES is easy to use,
you just turn it on like a file attribute. TC is transportable between any
Win version that runs it, compared to files made with XP Pro. Further, TC
containers are usually hidden, so an intruder doesn't even know where or
what the files are to hack them.
 
R

RWEmerson

Joe said:
XP excryption is a per file cipher [or folder, which then encrypts entire
contents]. Its good enough but there are better one's out there that give
you much more control over the encryption. it has a ton of ills:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/308989

http://computing.astate.edu/win2k/XP Encryption.htm

The freeware truecrypt blows it away easily.

http://www.truecrypt.org/

BUT, you have to be willing to learn how to use TC. XP AES is easy to use,
you just turn it on like a file attribute. TC is transportable between any
Win version that runs it, compared to files made with XP Pro. Further, TC
containers are usually hidden, so an intruder doesn't even know where or
what the files are to hack them.


Please advise whether any of you has used the encryption capability of
WindowsXP with Quicken 2006 and, if so, whether it worked well. If
issues, what were they?
Thanks, JJ - most helpful!
 
A

Andrew

RWEmerson said:
Please advise whether any of you has used the encryption capability of
WindowsXP with Quicken 2006 and, if so, whether it worked well. If
issues, what were they?
I trust you're aware the Quicken implements an optional password scheme
protection for their files? Perhaps not a 'strong' as hard triple-DES
encryption and all that secret stuff I know nothing about, but more the
adequate for the average user. Just pointing this out if you didn't already
know.
 
R

RWEmerson

Andrew said:
I trust you're aware the Quicken implements an optional password scheme
protection for their files? Perhaps not a 'strong' as hard triple-DES
encryption and all that secret stuff I know nothing about, but more the
adequate for the average user. Just pointing this out if you didn't already
know.
Yes, thanks, I'm aware of that capability. Unfortunately, cracking that
is trivial for the serious interloper.
 
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J

Joe John

Yes. I have equally very serious doubts about the degree of security in
the Quicken files. This is now a very serious issue because:

The file names are well known. An application would simply have to find
the directory, copy the file and send them. It need not be a distructive
virus, but any form of spyware masquerading as free software.

If you steal key files [ I won't mention them here] and manage to open
them, you can access very detailed information that can be used for ID
theft, or use the files themselves to make payment and transactions, or
crack further what the passwords are for the accounts of the owner are;

Quicken offers a fee service to break the password ... suggesting its
either is easy to break or it has a backdoor;

if your computer is stolen, the thief has the files and maybe able to
hack the data.

So, Truecrypt offers many many advantages to harden the data even more.
 

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